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Waterless Cookware Myths or Not

I would like to know if Waterless Cookware is a Myth or Not?

You see all kinds of Companies out there that states Waterless Cookware is the best way to go.

Yes I do like Top of the Line stiff, but don't like to pay over and above what stiff cost that includes Cookware.

I want to know what is the top brands and if Waterless Cookware is worth every penny you spend out on it?

Is there any place on the Internet that you can buy the Top of the Line in Waterless Cookware and if so what is the Web Site? I did find one and it is REAL COOKS.

Check them out and tell me what you think of there Waterless COOKWARE and there prices?

I am a big van for MADE IN THE USA.

If anyone has there brands please tell us about them.

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    1. "I would like to know if Waterless Cookware is a Myth or Not?"

      I say myth.

      "You see all kinds of Companies out there that states Waterless Cookware is the best way to go."

      All kinds of companies stated that? I don't think so.

      "I want to know what is the top brands and if Waterless Cookware is worth every penny you spend out on it?"

      I say not. Not every penny, not every dollar.

      7 Replies
      1. re: Chemicalkinetics

        Here is a set of Waterless Cookware that I would like your opinion on:

        WORLD'S FINEST STEAM CONTROL SYSTEM
        STEAM RELEASE VALVE KNOBS
        7-ply 304 SURGICAL STAINLESS STEEL
        WATERLESS COOKWARE WITH CARBON STEEL
        17 Pieces
        This 7-ply, surgical stainless steel waterless cookware set, which we call our "Ultra" set, is considered by many to be one of the highest quality waterless cookware sets on the market today. The manufacturer began manufacturing waterless cookware in 1950, and this was their very first set. History has proven this set to be a high quality, long lasting investment. The Ultra set is different from most waterless cookware sets in that it contains a layer of carbon steel between the layers of surgical stainless steel. Carbon steel is a heating element which carries the heat evenly to all parts of the cooking utensil and in the process prevents hot spots. This is important in waterless cooking, and allows food to cook naturally in their own juices within a complete circle of heat. The carbon steel was included in the construction of this set in order to make it possible to be used on an induction-top stove. The KT17ULTRA set is suitable for ceramic, induction-top, electric, and gas stoves. The handles are resistant to heat, cold and harsh detergents. This set weighs a total of 37 lbs. Lifetime Warranty.


        Item No. KT17ULTRA
        Regular Retail Price: $2195.00
        Wholesale Price: $329.99

        Now what do you think?

        An this one also:

        Maxam KT17 17-Piece 9-Element Surgical-Stainless-Steel Waterless Cookware Set

        Providing a wide range of essentials, this 17-piece cookware collection makes a nice choice for those setting up a first-time kitchen or for anyone looking to upgrade. The set includes a 1-2/3-quart covered saucepan, a 2-1/2-quart covered saucepan, a 3-1/5-quart covered saucepan, a 7-1/2-quart stove top roaster, an 11-3/8-inch skillet, a dome cover for the roaster and the skillet (can also be used directly on the stove-top as an extra skillet), and a flat cover for the roaster and the skillet, as well as a double boiler unit, five egg cups, and an egg utility rack. Use the saucepans when making homemade marinara sauce, cooking lentils, or heating up soup; the stovetop roaster works well for cooking large cuts of meat; and the skillet provides a wide flat base and tall sides--perfect for one-dish meals like chicken and rice. Melting chocolate's effortless with the double boiler in place (it can also be used directly on the stove-top as a 3-quart saucepan), and the egg cups allow for making poached eggs. The collection also provides a handy recipe book with step-by-step instructions.

        Best of all, the cookware can be used with the healthy "waterless" method of cooking. "Waterless" cooking allows for quickly cooking food on the stove-top at low temperatures and with only a very small amount of water--if any. It cooks in a way that retains almost all the vitamins and minerals (only 2-percent average mineral loss)--so veggies come out the same vibrant color as when they went in the pan. Even more, the high-quality cookware does not require additional grease or oil when cooking, which means low-fat meal options. Steam-cook food without the need for a steamer basket, bake a chocolate cake on the stove-top--between conventional cooking and the "waterless" method, the options are endless.

        To ensure fast, even heating with excellent heat retention and no hot spots, Maxam's "waterless" cookware features 304 surgical stainless-steel construction, inside and out, with an encapsulated thick aluminum disk in the base, which consists of nine elements: chrome, nickel, manganese, silicon, aluminum, iron, copper, molybedenum, and vanadium. The nine-element construction means that the cookware can be stacked, one on top of another, for space- and energy-saving convenience. Start by cooking on individual burners; when the steam-release valve in the lid whistles, simply stack the pans to finish cooking. For example, a hearty stew with carrots and potatoes can cook in the bottom pan, while broccoli cooks in a medium-size pan above that and another veggie cooks in a smaller-size pan on the very top. The self-sealing lids help lock in flavor and nutrients, and they can be inverted for nesting inside the proper pan before stacking or hanging the cookware when not in use. Even more, the thoughtfully designed cookware features nonslip phenolic handles that are welded to the outside (no rivets or screws inside the pan) and can withstand an oven's heat up to 350 degrees F (though the cookware is designed for stove-top use only--no need to turn on the oven when it's possible to bake on the stovetop). The handles are resistant to heat, cold, and detergents, and they offer a hanging hole at the end to help save on cupboard space. Safe to use on ceramic, electric, and gas stoves, the cookware carries a limited lifetime warranty and cleans up easily by hand with warm, soapy water (pots can go in the dishwasher, but the lids should be hand-washed due to the steam-release valves).

        What's in the Box
        1-2/3-quart, 2-1/2-quart, and 3-1/5-quart covered saucepans; 7-1/2-quart stove-top roaster; 11-3/8-inch skillet; dome cover for the roaster and skillet; flat cover for the roaster and skillet; double boiler; 5 egg cups; egg utility rack; recipe book with instructions.
        1-2/3-quart covered saucepan measures approximately 7-1/2 inches wide by 3-3/8 inches high
        2-1/2-quart covered saucepan measures approximately 8-5/8 inches wide by 3-3/4 inches high
        3-1/5-quart covered saucepan measures approximately 9-1/8 inches wide by 4-1/8 inches high
        7-1/2-quart stove-top roaster measures approximately 11-7/16 inches wide by 5-5/8 inches high
        11-3/8-inch skillet measures approximately 11-7/16 inches wide by 2-13/16 inches high
        Double boiler measures approximately 9-1/16 inches wide by 4 inches high
        Dome cover for roaster or skillet measures approximately 11 inches wide by 3-3/8 inches high
        Product Description
        This is the highest quality Steam Control Surgical Stainless Steel "Waterless" Cookware Set. Each piece is constructed of extra heavy surgical stainless steel and guaranteed to last a lifetime. Valves can screw on and off for easy cleaning.

        Please give me your thought on both of these sets.

        Thank-You

        1. re: nhoj28

          Hi, again, nhoj26:

          Here's what I think (in brackets)

          This 7-ply [layers 2,4,and 6 being useless, and good luck asking the mfgr. how thick 3 and 5 are], surgical [meaningless; why not "aerospace"?] stainless steel waterless [no, you need to put some in] cookware set, which we call our "Ultra" set [to justify charging $2,200], is considered by many [right, many in the company's marketing department] to be one of the highest quality waterless cookware sets on the market today [not saying a lot]. The manufacturer began manufacturing waterless cookware [and swindling folks ]in 1950, and this was their very first set. History [Really, how many total sets of waterless Ultra have been sold, relative to say, Revereware?] has proven this set to be a high quality, long lasting investment. [as if long-lasting is a sufficient cause for quality] The Ultra set is different from most waterless cookware sets in that it contains a layer of [ultra cheap] carbon steel between the layers of [ultra cheap] surgical [aerospace!] stainless steel. Carbon steel is a heating [not at all] element which carries the heat evenly [hahahaha!] to all parts of the cooking utensil and in the process prevents [a lie] hot spots. This is important in waterless cooking, and allows food to cook naturally in their own juices within a complete circle of heat [bizarrely idiotic]. The carbon steel was included in the construction of this set in order to make it possible to be used on an induction-top stove. [ah, there's the truth--forget even heat] The KT17ULTRA set is suitable [i.e., you won't starve--kinda like Visions] for ceramic, induction-top, electric, and gas stoves. The handles are resistant to heat, cold and harsh detergents [yessiree, surgical plastic]. This set weighs a total of 37 lbs. [37/17, including lids. Do the math--the stuff is not heavy] Lifetime Warranty [Sure, no problem when there's *at least* $1,800 PROFIT in the sale--see below].

          Item No. KT17ULTRA
          Regular Retail Price: $2195.00 [exists only to show what a bargain YOU got at the State Fair or because you're special]
          Wholesale Price: $329.99 [someone's *still* making a killing]

          The other ad is even more laughable, e.g., "an encapsulated thick aluminum disk in the base, which consists of nine elements: chrome, nickel, manganese, silicon, aluminum, iron, copper, molybedenum, and vanadium. The nine-element construction means that the cookware can be stacked, one on top of another, for space- and energy-saving convenience." This is pure gibberish and a complete non sequitur to boot--you need to have this fictional 9-element disk in order to stack the pans? Valves that screw off for easy cleaning? That's like touting a golf helmet's easy-to-clean chinstrap.

          Aloha,
          Kaleo

          1. re: kaleokahu

            That is a good point which get overlooked sometime. If they are making money at the $329.99 "wholesale price" (which they definitely do), then what the hell is up with the $2195 retail price? Do they really charge 20-30 folds of the manufacturing cost? Should one even consider buying products from such a company -- taking people as fools and treat them with no respect.

            Seriously, if we walked in a pizza shop, and the owner said to us that the pizzas are on sale at $10 for a 10" pizza, and they usually charge people for $100 for the same pizza. How would you feel about it? I would be absolutely turned off that they usually charge customers for $100 per pizza.

            1. re: Chemicalkinetics

              But Chemi, it sounds like such a deal! (BTW, I have a $100,000 Corolla in my driveway that I absolutely stole for 14 grand.)

          2. re: nhoj28

            "This 7-ply, surgical stainless steel waterless cookware set, which we call our "Ultra" set, is considered by many to be one of the highest quality waterless cookware sets on the market today."

            First, 7 ply of what? Low quality materials? Second considered one of the highest quality cookware by who? You said many, but who are these many people because I don't know any one thinks very highly about Waterless cookware, not CHOWHOUND people, not peole I know in person.

            "Carbon steel is a heating element which carries the heat evenly to all parts of the cooking utensil and in the process prevents hot spots"

            Carbon steel is not a very good thermal conductor, way worse than aluminum for example, so I have to disagree with your statement. If it is so awesome, why don't I just buy a carbon steel pan which is probably 1/5th of the price.

            "...healthy "waterless" method of cooking. "Waterless" cooking allows for quickly cooking food on the stove-top at low temperatures and with only a very small amount of water--if any"

            You know. Instead of keep calling this the "waterless" method, maybe you should call it for what it is: steaming. There is no such thing as "waterless" method. It is such a misleading marketing term. How would you feel if I call stir fry as "waterless vortex roasting"?

            "surgical stainless steel "

            Surgical stainless steels is such a stupid term.

            1. re: nhoj28

              That kind of pricing should indicate to anyone that it is likely NOT made in the USA..

          3. Cookware is what you make of it. I use both conventional and waterless. Both do what I need. I can spend $2500 at WS on a full set of All Clad d5 (m,ore with the copper core); I can spend the same amount on Salad Master, or 360 cookware, etc. All are stainless steel, some T304, others 18/10, etc. The big difference I see is the rim design. You can spend a couple of thousand on Mauviel. Is one better than the other? We have always purchased what we wanted, regardless of hype or what is now seen on tv reality cook shows.

            Different people have different likes. If you want all stainless, including the handles, and you want/just have to have waterless, look at the 360 line. Be prepared to pay a hefty price.

            We have 37 year old waterless that we still use. We have All Clad and Scanpan stainless as well as Cuisinart. We also have Swiss Diamond and Lodge cast iron We are happy with all of it.

            I don't know of any restaurants that use the stuff. In fact, on one of the shows, diners, drive ins and dives, you can see some pretty beat up aluminum stuff. I have only seen the shiny new cookware on the celebrity cook shows. And no, I have not seen any waterless used on any show, nor on any of the shopping channels.

            I expect a lot of folks to disagree with what I said but those are my feelings on the matter; Basically, you buy what makes you happy.

            1. When waterless cooking came about in the 1940s vegetables were traditionally cooked in quite a bit of water in American homes. Waterless cookware managed to create a vapor lock between the lid and pan and then released when it was done. Because the vitamins and minerals didn't end up in the water it was healthier.

              Since that time cooking methods have changed, some things cook well in lots of water, others require very little or no additional water.

              We have a set of Home Ec cookware from 1959, tri-ply stainless steel - copper - stainless steel, built like a tank and still in great shape. From what I can determine it was a division of Wear-ever Aluminum as was Cutco back then. The price was steep but very similar to what All-Clad sells for today. It is waterless cookware and when the vapor lock occurs you could (not should) lift the pan off the stove with the handle of the cover. It never gets used as waterless cookware because there is little control over the cooking. I prefer to see what is going on in the pan as I cook.

              What hasn't changed in over 60 years is the way waterless cookware is marketed and sold. They would like you to believe that everyone still cooks like WWII is still going on and that just isn't the case. Therefore there is no need to spend that amount of money to achieve the same results. They still manage to fool people just as silly knife infomercials do. If you understand that basically the food is being steamed then you realize that there are many ways to achieve this and you don't need a magical pan to do this.

              4 Replies
              1. re: SanityRemoved

                With all this said what brand of COOKWARE is Rated the very best by Consumers Report? This will tell the story about which one is.

                I am talking ether Waterless or Regular Cookware.

                Where else can one find the information we are looking for? There has to be some kind of report on where and what is the BEST COOKWARE.

                1. re: nhoj28

                  There is no such thing as best best cookware. There is however clear distinction between good cookware from bad cookware, just like good cars from bad cars, but there isn't a BEST car per sa.

                  1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                    Yes I will agree with that.

                    Like I said above I gave you my opinion on what the best is.

                    But you don't have to agree with it.

                    An in another way we know what most would buy brand wise and how much you would pay.

                    So yes there a a best brand of cookware just by the way it is made.

                    1. re: nhoj28

                      Although they would like you to believe otherwise, no company in existence today manufactures a perfect set of cookware. They generally specialize in one or two types of base metals and that doesn't work for perfect.

                      There are traits of various metals and cookware designs that benefit different types of cooking. It sounds nice that everything could look the same in style but that would not result in the best cookware.

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