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pankcake,egg and beef pan

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arevir Oct 10, 2011 03:41 PM

Hi i been looking to get and iron pan for a long time and i was set on a De buyer one but now i see some others

I see alot of people using the blue steel series is that due to them being cheaper? compared to the mineral B? mineral have the smooth surface? how rough is the other one

can you guys help me pick one
de buyer blue steel
http://www.amazon.com/Buyer-Pancake-C...
paderno
http://www.amazon.com/Paderno-World-C...
Vollrath
http://www.amazon.com/French-Style-Ca...
de buyer mineral b
http://www.amazon.com/DeBuyer-Mineral...

thanks for your time!

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  1. Chemicalkinetics RE: arevir Oct 10, 2011 03:49 PM

    "I see alot of people using the blue steel series is that due to them being cheaper?"

    I think a few of us bought the blue steel pans because they were on sale.

    "compared to the mineral B? mineral have the smooth surface? how rough is the other one"

    They both have smooth surface. The main difference is that the mineral series is thicker and the blue steel series is thinner. The second difference is that the blue steel cookware has a laminated surface according to deBuyer official response. I take it from the bluing process. I always prefer the blue steel series disregard of the prices. Blue steel pans have the thicker and weight which I like.

    No, I don't believe I can pick one for you.

    11 Replies
    1. re: Chemicalkinetics
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      arevir RE: Chemicalkinetics Oct 10, 2011 07:13 PM

      thanks for the info!
      by any chance do you know the cooking surface on that de buyer blue steel?
      http://www.amazon.com/Buyer-Pancake-C...
      the customer picture on there the pan look amazing!

      is blue steel and blue carbon steel the same?

      the paderno look to be a good one too then if it was between these 2
      http://www.amazon.com/Paderno-World-C...
      would you incline for one over the other

      1. re: arevir
        Chemicalkinetics RE: arevir Oct 14, 2011 12:07 PM

        A few of us that surface is just due to bluing process for the Blue Steel Pan, so basically oxidized black rust, as opposed to red rust. That discussion was on an older thread.

        There was another thread which a few of us participate after we purchased our debuyer pans. Here, it may be useful for you:

        http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/741895

        I don't know paderno personally, but I know a lot of people use it just fine. I don't see any reasons why paderno is not a good pan. Paderno is cheaper. It is said that Debuer is better made, but I don't know that for sure. We have people who bought "not so well made" Debuyer pans, so...

        1. re: Chemicalkinetics
          rosetown RE: Chemicalkinetics Oct 14, 2011 01:33 PM

          I own 4 paderno pans and they are fine and function well.

          comparision:
          1/ de buyer - higher walls and smaller bottom surface ratio to top surface - great for pan stirring - better finish - If you want a 10 inch pan then buy a 12 inch

          2/ paderno - bottom surface ratio to top is normal - finish on the walls are scored.

          It seems both products suffer from tipping. In the case of paderno, the smallest pan suffers the most. With food in the pan - no tipping problems.

          Still, if I could to it again, I would buy de Buyer - not that I'm unhappy with paderno in use.

          1. re: rosetown
            Chemicalkinetics RE: rosetown Oct 14, 2011 05:18 PM

            rosetown,

            You are awesome. It sounds like paderno is equally good.

      2. re: Chemicalkinetics
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        iyc_nyc RE: Chemicalkinetics Oct 13, 2011 05:16 PM

        Hey chem, what do you mean by the blue steel pans are thicker? I'd thought they were more lightweight and thinner than the other de Buyers (?)..

        1. re: iyc_nyc
          Chemicalkinetics RE: iyc_nyc Oct 14, 2011 11:52 AM

          iyc

          Blue steel is thinner. I wrote:

          "They both have smooth surface. The main difference is that the mineral series is thicker and the blue steel series is thinner. "

          Mineral and Carbone Plus is the same. Blue Steel thinner. Le Lyonnaise thinnest.

          1. re: Chemicalkinetics
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            iyc_nyc RE: Chemicalkinetics Oct 14, 2011 04:57 PM

            Thanks, Chem. I was referring to your last sentence: "Blue steel pans have the thicker and weight which I like." but now i understand..

            1. re: iyc_nyc
              Chemicalkinetics RE: iyc_nyc Oct 14, 2011 05:17 PM

              My mistaken. I meant to type: Blue steel pans have the *thickness" and weight which I like...... My apology.

              In short, blue steel pans are not too thick and heavy and not too thin for me.

              1. re: Chemicalkinetics
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                iyc_nyc RE: Chemicalkinetics Oct 14, 2011 05:47 PM

                Yep, I figured it out -- thanks.

                1. re: iyc_nyc
                  Chemicalkinetics RE: iyc_nyc Oct 14, 2011 05:49 PM

                  Are you trying to say that you figure out my mistake before I figure out my own mistake ?

                  :)

                  1. re: Chemicalkinetics
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                    iyc_nyc RE: Chemicalkinetics Oct 14, 2011 05:51 PM

                    Haha, no.. after your earlier response to my post I figured your last sentence was a typo. After all, you're always ridiculously consistent and rational..

      3. 7
        77Pat RE: arevir Oct 10, 2011 04:45 PM

        I am looking into this also. Another one to add into the mix is the Matfer Bourgeat Black Steel Fry Pan
        http://www.amazon.com/Matfer-Bourgeat...

        I guess it all comes down to personal preference.

        1. paulj RE: arevir Oct 14, 2011 11:48 AM

          I've bought blue steel pans from CostPlus World Markets for 50% off (i.e. $20). In fact I just saw that price again this week.

          I've seen Mineral once - at W&S. It is noticeably thicker and heavier.

          I use a well season carbon steel omelet pan for omelets, crepes, and pancakes; never for simmering.

          I use my slightly warped blue steel Lyonaise pan for the 'dirty work', like searing steaks on a gas burner outside. I don't worry about seasoning it (other than giving it a light coating of oil before hanging it up) because seasoning does not survive deglazing or soaking to remove burnt on food.

          I also have several sizes of Mexican carbon steel griddles (comal). They are cheap, and work great for cooking and warming (flour) tortillas. I even take a small diameter one when camping for grilling meat.

          3 Replies
          1. re: paulj
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            iyc_nyc RE: paulj Oct 14, 2011 04:55 PM

            Paul, did your blue steel pan from CostPlus warp, or was that another pan?

            1. re: iyc_nyc
              paulj RE: iyc_nyc Oct 14, 2011 05:40 PM

              I let it get too hot while drying after washing. It's still quite usable; it just rocks a bit.

              1. re: paulj
                Chemicalkinetics RE: paulj Oct 14, 2011 05:41 PM

                Paul...use a hammer and whack it. I did that to my wok.

          2. SanityRemoved RE: arevir Oct 14, 2011 05:44 PM

            All of the ones you listed are good pans.

            The crepe pan has a low rim to facilitate flipping crepes easier but not so good for tossing things over by jerking the pan.

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