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What to do with very gelatin-rich pork broth?

AlizaEss Oct 3, 2011 07:48 AM

I recently made a large batch of pork broth using the remains of my friend's barbequed 110 lb pig. There were two hooves included in the pork bits I used for this batch, resulting in an extremely gelatinous broth.

My question is: what's the best way to use a gelatinous broth?

I may use it to cook collards and black eyed peas with tomatoes, but don't know if it will make the texture of the dish weird?

  1. AlizaEss Oct 4, 2011 06:34 AM

    Yum! Thanks for the awesome ideas everyone. Making the pork broth was an intense 24 hour affair and I was burned out after the last batch, but now I've been inspired to make more!

    3 Replies
    1. re: AlizaEss
      alkapal Oct 4, 2011 06:36 AM

      so you are taking perfectly good bbq pork and turning it into broth? i don't understand.

      does. not. compute.

      1. re: alkapal
        AlizaEss Oct 4, 2011 06:47 AM

        Not to worry! I scraped up the remains of the pig after it was bbq'd and destroyed- head, hooves, skin, bones, fatty bits, etc. Cooked everything into a broth, then made cracklins with the skin afterward... still have two more bags of frozen pig bits!

        1. re: AlizaEss
          alkapal Oct 4, 2011 07:54 AM

          whew!
          i am relieved! LOL

    2. ipsedixit Oct 3, 2011 08:33 PM

      Congee aka porridge.

      1. s
        sandylc Oct 3, 2011 08:30 PM

        A pate or terrine. Check Julia Child.

        1. John E. Oct 3, 2011 05:24 PM

          Hoppin' John

          http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/foo...

          1. jmcarthur8 Oct 3, 2011 05:12 PM

            Pork or ham broth make a great potato soup. Very rich. I serve it with shredded cheddar and maybe a dollop of sour cream.

            1. John E. Oct 3, 2011 01:14 PM

              Pork pozole soup, pork chile verde, or any number of soups. I don't think it would be too 'gluey' for soup. I have made similar stock and have used it both straight and I've added it to other soups such as vegetable beef, bean, and chicken soups for added richness and 'mouth feel'. It's the gelatin in broths that really makes them good.

              1 Reply
              1. re: John E.
                d
                Dee S Oct 3, 2011 02:15 PM

                My vote is for pozole! Pozole Rojo with a thick pork stock is the only way to go. I smoke some tenderloin and make a wicked variation of Bayless' Pozole Rojo.

              2. m
                mateo21 Oct 3, 2011 12:53 PM

                Split pea soup!

                1. mnosyne Oct 3, 2011 11:33 AM

                  Sounds like it would be good for soup dumpling (X-L bao). They have a cube of gelatinized broth inside.

                  2 Replies
                  1. re: mnosyne
                    AlizaEss Oct 3, 2011 12:30 PM

                    Oh my god, that sounds perfect! I think that's a project to be taken up with friends... I still have two more chunks of frozen bbq pig to make into stock so I will definitely save this idea for the future! Can't wait!

                    1. re: AlizaEss
                      mnosyne Oct 3, 2011 03:50 PM

                      I found this handy youtube video on making XLB:

                      http://www.flickr.com/photos/joyosity...

                  2. paulj Oct 3, 2011 10:13 AM

                    You could add it by the spoonful to various dishes to add some body - gravies, soups, rice, etc. Used straight stock like this almost feels like it will glue your lips together, but used in moderation it can add richness and body without calling attention to itself.

                    1 Reply
                    1. re: paulj
                      AlizaEss Oct 3, 2011 11:15 AM

                      Yes, I think it will be too gluey as a soup.. a spoonful will be good in a demi-glace for greens and/or beans...

                    2. r
                      rjbh20 Oct 3, 2011 09:28 AM

                      I assume you used smoked pork? If so, use for greens, beans, blackeye peas, etc.

                      If not too smoky, also good as a base for minestrone and ramen.

                      3 Replies
                      1. re: rjbh20
                        peasantpalate Oct 3, 2011 09:34 AM

                        What about aspic?

                        1. re: peasantpalate
                          AlizaEss Oct 3, 2011 11:17 AM

                          Yes, it's perfect for aspic! I have an old cookbook with eggs and herbs in aspic. It looks lovely but I'm wondering if I would be able to convince anyone to eat it...

                          1. re: AlizaEss
                            porker Oct 3, 2011 05:35 PM

                            Instead of straight aspic, what about adding meat to the mold, getting something close to brawn (england) or headcheese (american) or gelatina (italian) or sulze (german). Defat the broth and strain to clean, add a pinch of allspice, season with bay leaf and salt (actually, use whatever seasonings or spices you'd like - i'm a big fan of sweet paprika for color and a subtle taste), then simmer. Place cooked meat in a container (I like the meat from the feet, bits of tendon, skin. I especially like cured, cooked tongue). Add a splash of white vinegar to the broth (to taste) top up container, let cool, and fridge overnight. Slice and enjooooy.
                            Should end up like this
                            http://www.myconfinedspace.com/wp-con...

                      2. alkapal Oct 3, 2011 08:21 AM

                        if you used it for greens or the peas, would you be using it full strength without additional water? that might be a little different , but not necessarily in a bad way. plus, it is going to melt down. how is the flavor? i think it'll be fine in your applications.

                        my first thought was that it'd be good for a hearty bean soup.

                        also, it'll be great to make a rich sauce for, say, some pork chops or pork tenderloin…. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demi-glace

                        1 Reply
                        1. re: alkapal
                          AlizaEss Oct 3, 2011 09:56 AM

                          Yeah, demi-glace or a hearty bean soup would be nice, thanks for the tip!

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