HOME > Chowhound > Home Cooking >

Changing Pumpkin Bread recipe from full size to "mini loaves"

jmckee Sep 28, 2011 07:46 AM

My favorite PB recipe is Rutherford Wynd Pumpkin Bread from Camille Glenn's Heritage of Southern Cooking. It makes one full sized loaf. I'd like to change the baking time (an hour) for several "mini loaves", using foil pans from the grocery. The original recipe calls for a cup of pumpkin and a can contains about six and a half cups, so I'd triple-and-a-half the recipe. Is this as simple as reducing the bake time, or do I need to tweak the temperature as well?

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. ChefJune RE: jmckee Sep 28, 2011 08:01 AM

    I've never tweaked the temp when I do this (every holiday season!) I start by setting the timer for half the baking time, and then watch it like a hawk for the first batch until it's golden brown and "perfect." Then I make a note of the baking time for subsequent batches/breads. Not very scientific, but it's always worked.

    1 Reply
    1. re: ChefJune
      bushwickgirl RE: ChefJune Sep 29, 2011 11:26 PM

      Not very scientific (it is as scientific as it gets, in my mind) but totally the way to do it.

      For the OP, you don't normally mess with temp, there are occasional exceptions, just cooking time.

    2. sunshine842 RE: jmckee Sep 29, 2011 11:55 PM

      I agree that you would only reduce the baking time, and not tweak the recipe OR the temperature.

      I would also make the recipes one batch at a time...when you start multiplying recipes by 2,3,4 times, the proportions begin to shift, and you could end up with a product that's not as good as your usual bread.

      I *might* try doubling it and making *that* in two batches, but tripling and more starts to cause problems.

      1 Reply
      1. re: sunshine842
        QuirkyCookery RE: sunshine842 Oct 1, 2011 02:25 AM

        Agreed. Don't touch the recipe or the temperature.....just the time.

        And been there, done that, quadrupled a recipe and been disappointed by the results. Sometimes instead, I will actually have 2 large bowls side-by-side and will measure the ingredients into each bowl for each batch at the same time....but mix separately as though it's two separate batches.

      2. k
        Kelli2006 RE: jmckee Sep 30, 2011 12:21 AM

        You can keep the baking temp the same, but you will need to shorten the baking time because there is less mass in the smaller loaves for the thermal energy to penetrate. Id start to check at 2/3 of the normal baking time with a toothpick in the center.

        If you bake all of the loaves at the same time bake certain that there is at least 2" of space between them and the back/sides of the oven for circulation. It wouldn't hurt to swap them front to back at halfway unless you have a convection oven.

        1. j
          J.Dish RE: jmckee Sep 30, 2011 12:52 AM

          Beware of leavening agents (baking soda or powder) as when you increase or decrease a yield the leavener doesn't always increase or decrease exactly the same as everything else. A recipe that calls for 1T baking powder, if I double it, I usually use 1T + 2t

          1. jmckee RE: jmckee Oct 3, 2011 09:47 AM

            Done! I multiplied the recipe, watched the little loavelings like a hawk, and it's the same wonderful bread on a miniature scale! Thanks all!

            1 Reply
            1. re: jmckee
              s
              sweetpotater RE: jmckee Oct 4, 2011 11:50 AM

              I make all my pumpkin/zucchini/banana/etc breads in several mini loaves. One stays out and the others go right into the freezer. Like everyone else said, only the time changes.

            2. r
              rockycat RE: jmckee Oct 4, 2011 06:50 AM

              Chiming in a little late but...My babka recipe makes 3 loaves and I only have 2 9x5 loaf pans so I bake the final third of the dough in 3 mini loaf pans. I generally start checking the little loaves at about 2/3 of the bake time for the full loaf. I find that somewhere between 2/3 and 3/4 of the time is right. I'm also pretty careful about scaling the loaves so that they will all bake evenly.

              Show Hidden Posts