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Best knives?

Wondering what are poeples' opinions about the best cutlery..
I use a Cutco knife for all of my chopping needs and I love it..

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  1. Hmm, in my experience, I love Aogami (blue paper) steel knives the best. They are easy to sharpen and take on a very nice edge. Yet, they are not as crazy reactive like the shirogami (white paper) steel knives. On the other hand, I really like my CCK (Chan Chi Kee) Chinese cleaver due to its very nice edge geometry and reasonably good steel. At the very moment, my favor knives are my Watanabe Aogami core Nakiri and my CCK carbon steel Chinese thin cleaver.

    1. This reminds me of some expression about worms...

      I'd try the search function, honestly, and you'll get reading material for days.

      3 Replies
      1. re: mateo21

        So, instead of providing a good answer, you'll just be a jerk. Nice.

        For the OP, I have a Victorinox, and it works great. It's not expensive if you buy one at a restaurant supply store. MANY restaurants use them, so that should let you know they are decent.

        1. re: danbuter

          hahahaha... Really? I suggested doing a search on the topic, remind me why this is being a jerk?

          Honestly it's an amazingly complex question which depends on a huge variety of preferences, tolerances, budget, food prepared, etc., etc., etc... doing a search an reading the copious amounts of material already written on the subject will provide answers, as this question is VERY vague, and make the OP more informed to ask a more detailed question.

          1. re: mateo21

            I agree - it is not a jerk response. It's just a response. And the Chowhound search function absolutely stinks - so some people do miss some great threads. Google searching the site works much better.

      2. Sharp ones. Reeeeally sharp ones.

        As Mateo pointed out, there is a huge amount of discussion of knives here on CH, and even more over at knifeforums.com 'in the kitchen' section and kitchenknifeforums.com and 'fred's cutlery forum' over at foodieforums.com.

        In terms of mass produced knives, I'm a fan of Japanese-made gyutos (basically thin chef knives with a modified French profile), especially super thin, sleek knives that some of us knife nerds have termed 'lasers.' I use a Sakai Yusuke in hitachi white carbon steel that I like quite a bit.

        But there are a lot of great knives out there, some quite affordable, some super expensive. There is no single 'best' knife or knifemaker.

        1 Reply
        1. re: cowboyardee

          ive been hearing about the Gyutos. i watched a video review for one (C6 Size: 9.5" x 2.5 mm with Micarta Handle), it seemed like a great knife.. i'm no chef, i just like to cook :) lol

        2. It's certainly not Cutco for a start!

          I house-sat for a friend this summer who had been suckered into buying a huge block of Cutco crap from a student of hers. I have never used a more unwieldy, heavy, unbalanced piece of garbage in my life. And this from a person who grew up with dull, old, stamped knives.

          The fact that you can't sharpen Cutco without voiding the warranty should be abhorrent to anyone who knows good knives. I don't have the time to send away a knife for weeks on end - I need my hardware when I need it.

          That being said, I use Wusthof - Ikon and Classic - and Henckels - Vier Sterne. I used to have (and lost) a Wusthof Grand Prix that I liked a lot, but adore the Ikon 8" chef's knife and - truly - use it as much as my 8" Vier Sterne with granton edge.

          18 Replies
          1. re: ProfessorBear

            I like my French shaped knifes and my favorite knife is a Thiers Issard carbon steel chefs knife with the round instead of squared bolster.

            I have 2 German patten chef's knives in 6 and 8" plus 8" and 10" Forschners but I still prefer my carbon steel knife.

            1. re: ProfessorBear

              The fact that you can't sharpen Cutco without voiding the warranty should be abhorrent to anyone who knows good knives. I don't have the time to send away a knife for weeks on end - I need my hardware when I need it.

              That voids the warranty? Geesus

              1. re: Dave5440

                Ehhh ... if you know what you're doing, they'll never know that you sharpened it anyway. Also, if your knives need a warranty in the first place (outside of the free sharpening service), something is probably wrong.

                1. re: cowboyardee

                  My wifes cutcraps all have a mirror edge, do you think they would notice?

                  1. re: Dave5440

                    Just run em over with your car a few times before sending em in and they'll look like plenty of the knives they see.

                    1. re: cowboyardee

                      I can hear the customer service rep now,,,, well we would have replaced these broken knives but someone sharpened them like a good knife,,bad choice they aren't !!

                      1. re: Dave5440

                        :) Ha ha ha. Right, they look at the bevel and say, "Hmm, the edge looks way better than the factory edge. Someone must have sharpened this knife. Warranty no more!"

                        Just kidding. By the way, is that "voiding warranty for sharpening Cutco knives" really true? I didn't see that in the Cutco website. Sounds like a crazy warranty if it is remotely true. It is like voiding a car warranty for washing the car.

                        1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                          I'm pretty sure that warranty exists just so that people don't take their serrated knives to a Chefs Choice or an Accusharp or a belt sander and then expect Cutco to fix em. I'd be very surprised if Cutco ever voided anyone's warranty for sharpening one of their straight edge knives well.

                          1. re: cowboyardee

                            I'm really not sure . just going by above poster, but i'm sure it's happened

                2. re: Dave5440

                  Cutco sells a knife sharpener, and sharpening any straight-edge CUTCO knife does NOT void the warranty. However, like the Henkels and other brands, damage to serrated edges from sharpening is considered abuse.
                  CUTCO knives have a "FOREVER warranty" (100% ) for damage resulting from normal use and a 50% guarantee for damage resulting from abuse.
                  Yes... if you break the knife on purpose, they will replace it at half the cost.

                  I've never had any of my CUTCO knives even need sharpening, and they were used frequently from 1968. One French Chef knife was replaced because it chipped while chopping rock-hard-frozen broccoli after many times doing the same. CUTCO deemed this as normal use and replaced the ONE French Chef knife with TWO French Chef knives so my mother would not be unhappy with the knife after so long being a customer - (40 years)

                  I have both CUTCO and Henkel, and I prefer some CUTCO knives to the Henkel counterparts, and prefer some Henkel knives to the CUTCO counterparts.

                  1. re: WayTooSerious

                    "I've never had any of my CUTCO knives even need sharpening, and they were used frequently from 1968"

                    I am sorry, but I really need to point this out. Your statement is is almost like saying: "I have never had any of my Tommy Hilfiger clothing need washing, and I have frequently worn them since 1968" This statement does not, in anyway, boost Tommy Hilfiger

                    Instead of helping the Cutco reputation, your above statement hurts your credibility as a person who undersands and cares for kitchen knives.

                      1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                        "I am sorry, but I really need to point this out. Your statement is is almost like saying: "I have never had any of my Tommy Hilfiger clothing need washing, and I have frequently worn them since 1968" This statement does not, in anyway, boost Tommy Hilfiger "

                        Oh Chem..you crack me up.. :D

                        1. re: petek

                          :D I was going to use an example of "Calvin Klein, underwear, and unwash for 40 years", but I figured that is too much for some people.

                        2. re: Chemicalkinetics

                          Sorry for the miscommunication. I had talked about two kinds of sharpening, and I didn't specify which kind of sharpening my knives didn't need.

                          Indeed, I regularly "sharpen" or "maintain" the straight-edge knives.

                          I meant to convey that I've never had any of the CUTCO *serrated-edge* knives need the "send-in-your-serrated-knives-for-sharpening" kind of sharpening.

                          I've also not needed to send in straight edge knives for sharpening.

                          What I ultimately meant to convey, but was unclear about, was:
                          I've never needed to send any knives to CUTCO, neither serrated-edge nor straight-edge, for sharpening.

                          ------
                          TO THE O.P.:
                          In contrast to the negativity that they've otherwise received in this thread, CUTCO knives have performed satisfactorily for me at home.
                          I have used and like both Henkel and CUTCO. I recommend both brands.

                          1. re: WayTooSerious

                            "I meant to convey that I've never had any of the CUTCO *serrated-edge* knives need the "send-in-your-serrated-knives-for-sharpening" kind of sharpening."
                            ______
                            They'd cut better if you had them sharpened. Cutcos aren't the priciest knives out there, but they're not cheap either. You can use them almost indefinitely as dull, small, kitchen-based utility saws - as long as they still have teeth, they'll cut things in a basic sense. If that's what you want, you may as well just buy the cheapest serrated knives you can find, But if you've already sprung for cutco, you may as well use the biggest upside of them - the free sharpening.

                            "I've also not needed to send in straight edge knives for sharpening."
                            ________
                            If, on the off chance, you've only been maintaining em with a steel, try sending these in for a sharpening as well. You might be surprised at the difference.

                    1. Been using very old Dexter Russell carbon steel chef's knives forever. Sharpen perfectly and good weight distribution for balance. My go to is a all purpose 7" Dexter, Have three very expensive knives l got in Japan and use for fish, that is it, for fish.