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Forcella- Fried Pizza on Lorimer Street

MsAlyp Sep 21, 2011 12:38 PM

Hi All,
A few months ago a new pizza place called Forcella opened up on Lorimer Street. Lately I've been reading more about it, in particular their deep fried pizza. Basically they deep fry the dough first then sauce /cheese it and then put it in the oven. I've search Chowhoud but didn't see much on this place- anyone had this fried pizza?

http://forcellaeatery.com/

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Forcella
485 Lorimer St, Brooklyn, NY 11211

  1. squid kun Sep 21, 2011 02:14 PM

    Some earlier reports ... http://www.chow.com/digest/87529/neap...

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    Forcella
    485 Lorimer St, Brooklyn, NY 11211

    1. f
      foodwhisperer Jun 19, 2012 05:40 AM

      The fried pizza is very good. But that's where all the hype about Forcella is , and people think they only make fried pizza. I also tried some of the other pizza there that is baked in the wood oven and they are very good and not fried. The crust isn't as good as Motorino though.
      On another note, this youtube about pizza throwing is amazing and they highlight Nino's and Di Fara in the clip.
      http://youtube.googleapis.com/v/G7er8...

      3 Replies
      1. re: foodwhisperer
        Silverjay Jun 19, 2012 06:08 AM

        I really dig Forcella. The Montanara is interesting and good. The quick fry gives the crust a little bit of a dynamic texture and mouthfeel- more porous and slightly crunchy. But I really like their regular pies as well and am actually a big fan of their regular crust. It's very light, but still with a nice chewiness. I've enjoyed the Porta Capuana, which is a layer of cheese, a layer of arugula, and a layer of prosciutto. I think they are a bit underrated and compare favorably to much heralded Pauli Gees in that general neck of the woods.

        1. re: foodwhisperer
          Steve R Jun 19, 2012 06:08 AM

          Thanks for the link. Sometimes, I just love Dom's candid answers: "It doesn't do much good for the pizza, so..."

          By the way, based on one experience at Forcella's (actually, the one in Manhattan), I think it's pretty good. Of the newer places, I think I prefer Keste overall.

          1. re: Steve R
            f
            foodwhisperer Jun 19, 2012 09:48 PM

            Yeah, the link has some humor to it. Motorino is my favorite in the city. Co. which is totally a different experience has a really good tasting dough, probably the same dough as some of the bread at Sullivan St. Bakery. For 'old school" non wood, non coal pizza, I've been going to New Park Pizza since I'm a kid, and I still enjoy their pizza, especially the sauce they put on it.

        2. s
          scott123 Jun 19, 2012 09:28 AM

          Fried pizza is over rated. Neapolitan pizza is one of the few foods that isn't better fried. If you go to Forcella, taste the fried pizza, just to say you did, but go back for the non fried pizza.

          Forcella uses a wetter dough than Keste and Motorino, but bakes the pizza in the same amount of time. This gives them a moister crumb. It's not inherently better or worse than the other places, just different. I, personally, enjoy a moist crumb, so Forcella is my favorite Neapolitan crust. Toppings-wise, Motorino has an edge with their brussels sprouts pie and Paulie Gee's creative topping flair is unparallelled (although not strictly Neapolitan). This can get pretty subjective, though. For those that take Neapolitan pizza seriously, Keste, Motorino, Forcella, Roberta's and Paulie Gees are the best places in the city.

          1. Cheese Boy Jun 20, 2012 10:00 AM

            I'm guessing that Forcella's fried pizza is something similar in texture and taste to a NY deep fried cheese calzone. Many people like a cheese calzone if it's deep fried rather than oven-baked, so I can understand if Forcella develops a following rather quickly. If Forcella were to move down south, heh, they'd likely be swamped with customers.

            1 Reply
            1. re: Cheese Boy
              f
              foodwhisperer Jun 20, 2012 02:04 PM

              Your right about it sounding like something the South would like. Down South they fry everything. I had fried corn on the cob a couple of weeks ago in Tennessee. In any case, The friend pizza doesn't really taste or feel like a fried calzone. I think if they didn't tell you it was fried , you wouldn't know it. They fry the dough , but then they bake it, cheese and sauce on top. Looks like regular pizza too.

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