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Banana Bread needs HELP

caiatransplant Sep 13, 2011 11:40 AM

Hi all. I got a terrific recipe for banana bread and started making it, only to find that I was a 'nana or two short, so I peeled and chopped 2 still edible peaches and added that. It measured just a little more than the specified amount of mashed banana. Anyway, I baked it per directions at the specified temp (I have a hanging oven thermometer so I know the temp was right). The recipe called for an hour to an hour and five minutes. I stuck a toothpick in the middle after an hour and it was doughy, so I did another five and checked it again - still doughy. I baked it for a total of 1 hour and 15 minutes and thought all was cool. It was delicious until today, when I got to the middle of the loaf - OMG - STILL DOUGHY!!

The only thing I can think of is that I baked it in a ceramic (Corning Ware) loaf pan rather than a metal one. I was afraid to bake it longer for fear it would burn or become so overcooked on the edges that it would be terrible. Anyone have any ideas??

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    INDIANRIVERFL RE: caiatransplant Sep 13, 2011 11:45 AM

    Measure twice, cut once.

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      sueatmo RE: caiatransplant Sep 13, 2011 12:07 PM

      Is it possible that you shorted the flour by accident? Otherwise, get a banana bread recipe from a reliable cookbook, and bake that. If that recipe turns out well, pitch the defective recipe. Also, you can compare ingredients between cookbook and the recipe you got. I can see where the peaches might have added a little more moisture to the batter, but what you describe sounds like too little flour, or possibly too little leavening. I don't think using a ceramic pan is the culprit. Rescue your bread by slicing it and grilling it in a grill pan, or toasting it. Spoon a little flavored yogurt over it, and you've got a dessert.

      2 Replies
      1. re: sueatmo
        caiatransplant RE: sueatmo Sep 13, 2011 12:30 PM

        Thanx, suetmo. I don't think I shorted the flour but maybe . . . Putting it in a grill pan on the stovetop sounds like a great idea. I tried to toast a slice when I first cut into it but it broke all over everywhere when I tried to get it out of the toaster. And diet be damned - I'll slather it in butter and then top it with a blob of the peach jam I recently made!!

        1. re: caiatransplant
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          sueatmo RE: caiatransplant Sep 13, 2011 02:35 PM

          Oh, wow, that sounds good!

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        frannieface77 RE: caiatransplant Sep 13, 2011 12:21 PM

        It's happened to me with persimmon bread- I think perhaps a thinner fruit puree makes a difference? Here's my (taken from my mother) tip- bake banana bread in a 9x13 baking pan instead of a loaf pan.

        1 Reply
        1. re: frannieface77
          caiatransplant RE: frannieface77 Sep 13, 2011 12:31 PM

          Y'know - I was thinking about that - maybe bake it in a cake pan as opposed to a loaf pan. Next time. Thanx!

        2. chowser RE: caiatransplant Sep 13, 2011 12:25 PM

          Next time, reduce the oven temperature by 25 degrees when it's close to being done so the crust doesn't overcook. It's trickier to tell when banana bread is done because it's so moist so until you can tell easily by the toothpick test, it might be easier to go by temperature (about 190).

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            nutmeg0287 RE: caiatransplant Sep 13, 2011 01:56 PM

            I'm no expert, but it could maybe be the peaches? I made a banana bread from a tried and true recipe once and did something similar by adding some peaches and the same thing happened. I think my problem was that I added too much peach for the banana I shorted and just gave it too much moisture. That's my theory anyway!

            4 Replies
            1. re: nutmeg0287
              L.Nightshade RE: nutmeg0287 Sep 13, 2011 02:52 PM

              I agree with nutmeg's theory. I recently made a cake that called for apples, but I subbed peaches. They exuded so much moisture that the cake was still like batter over an hour past the designated cooking time. I have done the cake with apples and know the timing is correct. I just let it go a bit longer and called it a bread-pudding-style cake! But it is surprising how much juice peaches release when cooking.

              1. re: nutmeg0287
                caiatransplant RE: nutmeg0287 Sep 13, 2011 03:54 PM

                Could be!! It tasted really good, though. I think next time I'll just stick with the recipe as written. As a baker I make a good plumber, so I should stick with the recipe.

                1. re: caiatransplant
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                  sueatmo RE: caiatransplant Sep 13, 2011 06:13 PM

                  Subbing things out, trying stuff is how you learn to cook. I would have put peaches in if I had run out of bananas too. I like to bake banana bread. I can't eat it now because I eat low carb, but I too have a killer recipe that I like to make. Have fun with your banana bread.

                  1. re: sueatmo
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                    nutmeg0287 RE: sueatmo Sep 14, 2011 05:18 AM

                    I agree! If it tasted good, try adding a bit more flour or something next time. Or maybe just a little less peach. It could be your new favorite recipe! When I experiment I like to try to make things in halves so I don't waste so much if it doesn't work. Mini loaves or muffins are best for that.

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                acgold7 RE: caiatransplant Sep 13, 2011 10:55 PM

                Bananas are almost entirely starch. Peaches are almost entirely cellulose and water. They are completely different and won't bake the same. That's your issue. Adding extra flour and leavening would probably have helped, as noted above.

                1. Hank Hanover RE: caiatransplant Sep 14, 2011 12:08 AM

                  I highly recommend the Cook's Illustrated banana bread recipe except for the banana slices on the top of the loaf. I have met people that liked that part... I didn't.,

                  Anyway the secret is using 5 bananas in the recipe which would normally cause the cake to be too moist and heavy.

                  They drain the juice from the 5 bananas either by nuking them in the microwave or freezing them overnight after they have been over ripened... My favorite technique. They drain the juice and cook it down to 1/4 cup of concentrated banana juice. Add it back to the recipe and it comes out great. Big banana flavor.

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