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Inquiry about making tomato sauce for pasta??? should i simmer canned tomatoes a bit longer than 30mins???

h
hae young Sep 12, 2011 06:51 AM

hey!

i cook canned tomatoes according to recipe of mario batali.

in the recipe, mario uses 2 cans of tomatoes, each of which has 800 grams of raw tomatoes plus its juices.

but i normally buy much larger one, that weights 2.92 kilo grams IN TOTAL.

it consists of 85 % raw tomatoes plus 14% of its thin juices.

mario instruct to cook the canned tomatoes of1600 grams(1,6 kilo grams ) like this.

first bring the tomatoes in pot up to boiling point and then simmer gently about 30 minuits.

does this instruction still apply to much larger quanty of tomatoes like mine(2.92 kilo grams

  1. t
    thimes Sep 12, 2011 07:58 AM

    I'm not 100% sure what you are asking. It will depend (I know not a good answer) but if you are simmering them in a large shallow pan with a lot of surface area then 30 minutes might be fine. If you are simmering them in a pan without a lot of surface area then you may need more time.

    I would start with 30 minutes, if it still seems too thin or tastes a little "weak" in terms of tomato flavor then simmer a little longer. . . . .

    2 Replies
    1. re: thimes
      h
      hae young Sep 12, 2011 08:03 AM

      i use stainless-still 6 quart as-usual stock pot.

      1. re: hae young
        busycookinthelou Sep 12, 2011 08:11 AM

        I agree with Thimes. I would start with 30 minutes and then check frequently to determine when it is the appropriate consistency and taste. I rarely time things because I know there are a lot of factors that can cause a recipe to be done sooner/later than the expected time.

    2. f
      fourunder Sep 12, 2011 08:40 AM

      There are many recipes you can make as a *quick sauce* in as little as 15-20 minutes with canned tomatoes. Generally these sauces are made with diced or stewed tomatoes and would be classified as *chunky* tomato sauce. If you are looking to make a smoother sauce, 30-60 minutes is fine, even with a larger can of tomatoes. If you plan to make a ragu sauce, then I would say you need to go longer....increasing the time as the volume goes up.

      1. e
        escondido123 Sep 12, 2011 09:45 AM

        Do you put the tomatoes in whole, break them up or mill them before you begin? Milling gives you a smooth, thick sauce quickest, breaking them up speeds the process and leaving them whole takes the longest. Also, as someone mentioned, if you do it in a large frying pan it will thicken quicker--and you will be able to finish your pasta in the sauce (take out what you're saving first).

        1 Reply
        1. re: escondido123
          h
          hae young Sep 12, 2011 05:25 PM

          i grind the tomatoes with hand blender before cooking in the pot.

        2. Bada Bing Sep 12, 2011 05:32 PM

          There should be no significant issue in the quantity difference for the recipe, unless perhaps Batali was quite particular about the size of pot that you were supposed to use. (Evaporation varies according to pot shape and size.)

          Tomato sauce is one of those areas of cooking with few absolutes and lots of wiggle room and room for variations. It's not like baking, which can be very exacting, like a chemistry experiment.

          Just refer to your tastes for moisture level, salt, degree of chunkiness, etc., and you'll be doing what Batali would wish, I'm sure.

          1. o
            oldunc Sep 12, 2011 06:19 PM

            If you're planning to reduce the tomatoes solely by cooking (as opposed to milling, chopping etc.) It's to a great extent a matter of how ripe they are. Canned tomatoes will almost always be riper than commercial fresh tomatoes, which are picked dead green and never really ripen- but they differ between themselves. If there are parts that are yellowish, and seem hard, they'll take longer than the no doubt primo tomatoes that Batali uses. What you need to do is figure out where you're trying to get, and you'll be able to tell when you're there.

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