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September 2011 COTM, Slater/ Kitchen Diaries: Spring

LulusMom Sep 1, 2011 01:23 AM

Please use this thread to discuss and review recipes from the chapters for March, April and May.

The Chowhound Team has asked me to remind you that verbatim copying of recipes to the boards is a violation of the copyright of the original author. Posts with copied recipes will be removed.

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  1. greedygirl RE: LulusMom Sep 1, 2011 12:52 PM

    A fast cake with blueberries and pears, p136 British edition

    The small pear tree in my small garden has produced a lot of fruit this year, for some reason (probably weather-related), and so I'm looking for recipes to use them up. I also wanted to take a sweet treat to work tonight to cheer everyone up and this fitted the bill nicely.

    It's easy to make - a basic cake batter which is equal parts butter, sugar and flour, made in the usual way, with eggs and baking powder. Then you scatter cubed pears and blueberries over the top before you bake. The recipe is here:

    http://chopstirgrate.wordpress.com/20...

    Mine didn't rise that much, which I initially thought was my fault (I am not a regular baker of cakes and my baking powder was pretty old), but having googled the recipe I think it's supposed to be like that. I've only tasted a very small amount as I'm taking it to work, but it was delicious - moist and the blueberries cut nicely through the sweetness of both the cake and the pears. It helps that my pears are really good - I have no idea of the variety but they are golden-fleshed, sweet and very juicy. Just need to get through the other two dozen or so before they go bad!

    1 Reply
    1. re: greedygirl
      greedygirl RE: greedygirl Sep 1, 2011 05:00 PM

      So the cake was a big hit with my work colleagues. It really is very nice indeed with a cup of tea or coffee, and would work with other fruit combinations I think. I do love blueberries in a cake though.

    2. Goblin RE: LulusMom Sep 2, 2011 08:06 AM

      Chicken with Mustard Seed and Coconut Milk, p. 108, American Edition

      For some reason I'm cooking out of the month of April and it's actually September around here! Maybe because the evenings are just beginning to exhibit a bit of a chill . . .

      Anyway, this recipe is subtitled "A fragrant chicken supper" for April 1. And it is that. You brown your chicken pieces in peanut oil and remove them from the pan. You then bloom lightly-crushed cumin, coriander, and black mustard seeds in the same pan, then add chopped small hot red chili peppers, shredded fresh ginger, and chopped onions. Stir "from time to time so that nothing burns." Next, simmer some chopped garlic, ground turmeric, chopped tomatoes, curry leaves, and a little salt in the same pan, stir in a can of coconut milk, and add the chicken back in. Partially cover and simmer until chicken is done, 20-30 minutes according the recipe.

      The book's photo opposite the recipe tells a lot: you see a hearty, rustic-looking dish surrounded by plentiful golden sauce full of lots of chopped bits of deliciousness. And that's exactly what you get. The Indian-style combination of flavors goes nicely together. I had to make some minor substitutions for ingredients I couldn't find: brown mustard seeds for black ones; dried red hot chiles instead of fresh ones. I didn't have curry leaves, so left them out. I don't think my changes changed the flavor much, with the exception of the missing curry-leaves, which I hear can add a wonderful flavor. My chilies were the small red dried Thai chilies; I was rather fearful of their heat and only used one dried for the three fresh ones suggested; next time I'll used at least two.

      My chicken took twice as long as Slater indicates to become fully tender; maybe my strapping American chicken pieces are larger than the usual British size?

      I also liked that I could make the dish ahead; Slater remarks that he felt the sauce only improved "after a night in the fridge."

      1. Goblin RE: LulusMom Sep 2, 2011 09:02 AM

        Chicken with Vermouth, Tarragon, and Cream, p. 141, American Edition

        So here I go cooking out of the month of April again! This unctuously smooth, delicately flavored chicken dish has relatively few ingredients and not complicated prep-- though Slater gives very particular instructions about each step. Eight chicken pieces on the bone ("preferably thighs" but I used a combination of breasts and thighs) are seasoned with S & P, lightly browned in butter, and then the pan is deglazed with a wineglass* of dry vermouth plus 2 TBS of tarragon vinegar. Then the leaves from a small bunch of tarragon and 1 1/4 cup of heavy cream are added to the wine/vinegar mixture, at which point the chicken is added back to the pan and simmered until done--Slater says 15-20 minutes, though mine took longer. Slater suggests adding a squeeze of lemon juice or a dash of tarragon vinegar at serving time to brighten the flavor.

        An easy, rich fricassee which tastes very French with that particular combination of vermouth, tarragon and cream. I used half and half instead of heavy cream and this was a mistake, I found-- not so far as flavor, but for texture. (more about this later) The other problem was that my family, while appreciative, did not feel the finished dish had enough flavor--it needed needed more "something" said Mr. Goblin. I'm pretty sure this was my fault; I did not have tarragon vinegar and used plain white wine vinegar. Though my tarragon was lovely and copious, fresh from the herb garden, the finished dish really needed more zip. A heavier hand with the lemon juice might have improved it, but I really think I'll steep my own tarragon-vinegar ahead for the next time I make this. Because I think this dish would be perfect for what Julia might term "a chic little luncheon" or dinner party if properly made and seasoned.

        So what about the half-and-half? When I poured it into the hot reduced wine/vinegar mixture, it instantly curdled into tiny little pieces of casein. No amount of whisking could reconstitute it. It still tasted fine and I ended up serving it to my long-suffering family, but curdled non-the-less . The instructions, precise as they were, had not warned that only heavy cream (or creme-fraiche) can successfully be added to hot and acidic pan mixtures because they both contain so little casein. Not so with lighter half-anf-half, or sour cream. I should have remembered this! Sigh. Cooking can be a humbling process..

        *wineglassful
        a unit of volume used in British food recipes. The wineglass holds 2.5 (British Imperial) fluid ounces, 5 tablespoonfuls, 1/2 gill, or about 71.0 milliliters. One wineglassful is equal to 0.60 U.S. cup.

        10 Replies
        1. re: Goblin
          LulusMom RE: Goblin Sep 2, 2011 10:07 AM

          Sounds absolutely incredible. Right up my ally. Thanks for the detailed instructions - I cant' get hold of this book, and now maybe I can make it!

          1. re: LulusMom
            greedygirl RE: LulusMom Sep 2, 2011 10:14 AM

            Here's an online version - I think most of Nigel's recipes are online!

            http://quinedynasty.com/recipes/chick...

            And personally, for me a wineglassful is at least 100ml, possibly 125ml. It's not an exact term!

            1. re: greedygirl
              LulusMom RE: greedygirl Sep 2, 2011 10:38 AM

              Fantastic. Thank you. That sounds like something we'll all love.

              and personally, a wine glass is wwwwway big.

          2. re: Goblin
            m
            MelMM RE: Goblin Sep 2, 2011 12:31 PM

            There is something off in your conversions. 1 gill = 0.6 US cup. So if a wineglass were 1/2 gill, it would be 0.3 cup. Also, 71 ml is about 0.3 cup. Which would be 2.4 US fl. ounces or 2.5 imperial fl. ounces.

            1. re: MelMM
              greedygirl RE: MelMM Sep 2, 2011 12:54 PM

              I don't know about gills or US fluid oz, but I would say a wineglassful should be about half a cup.

              1. re: MelMM
                Goblin RE: MelMM Sep 2, 2011 03:48 PM

                There may well be something off in these conversions, which I confess I couldn't understand at all except for the last line about a British wineglassful equalling .6 of a US cup. ;-) After a certain amount of bewildering meandering around the internet, I took the definition from the following site, called "Units of Measurement" and published by someone named Russ Rowlett, from the U of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. (Scroll down to the entry "wineglassfull.")

                http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/dic...

                1. re: Goblin
                  m
                  MelMM RE: Goblin Sep 2, 2011 07:20 PM

                  I have contacted the author about this error. The other measures seem to line up, so I believe it is just the cup conversion that is off. So the final entry should be 0.3 US cup.

              2. re: Goblin
                LulusMom RE: Goblin Sep 11, 2011 03:56 PM

                Many thanks to Goblin for bringing this recipe (Chicken with Vermouth, Tarragon and Cream) to my attention. She's done a great job of describing it, so I don't have much to add. I did use the tarragon vinegar, fresh tarragon, and the lemon juice (which I almost forgot and added at the last moment). We all loved it. Licking the plates kind of loving it.

                1. re: LulusMom
                  Goblin RE: LulusMom Sep 11, 2011 04:12 PM

                  Glad you liked it, LulusMom! It really is a satisfying sumptuous dish and I'm glad to hear that the tarragon vinegar and the final addition of enough lemon juice to make it sparkle made this the into "licking the plates kind of loving it." Love the description.

                  1. re: Goblin
                    LulusMom RE: Goblin Sep 11, 2011 04:29 PM

                    Wouldn't have even known about it without your review. Thanks so much.

              3. Gio RE: LulusMom Sep 3, 2011 06:06 AM

                4.25 No Name Spaghetti Garlic Parmigiano Recipe, Pg. 135, USA Ed.

                This recipe may be untitled but it's not unremarkable. Both for the ease of preparation and for the surprisingly delicious flavor of the finished dish.

                What could be simpler: al dente pasta tossed with new season's garlic, olive oil, lots of freshly ground black pepper and imported Parmigiano Regiano. That's my kind of quick-in-a-hurry-meal. G is still at surprised how good it was with so few ingredients and so little effort. Served with the Goat Cheese and Beet Salad from Tender, page 48.

                Cook's Note: Because my new season garlic was Very mild I used 4 rather large cloves instead of 2. NS uses finely chopped raw garlic but I chose to sauté it just for a few minutes since raw garlic and I don't like each other.

                1. Gio RE: LulusMom Sep 3, 2011 07:33 AM

                  5.23 Roast Pork with Lemon and Potatoes, Pg. 167, USA Ed.

                  We made this at the end of August. Used everything the recipe called for: 16 new potatoes, 2 lemons, fennel seeds, olive oil, and a boned rolled loin of pork- 2 1/3 lbs - with just a thin layer of fat on one side..

                  NS says to just wipe the potatoes then proceed but our potatoes were straight out of the soil so I scrubbed them in water then dried, cut them in half, put them into a bowl. Slice the lemons in thin wedges, add to potatoes along with a drizzle of olive oil and large grindings of sea salt and black pepper.

                  Rub salt all over the pork then heat some oil in a roasting pan over high heat, place the pork in the pan and sear on all sides. Next, arrange the potatoes and lemons in the pan and cook for 20 minutes in a preheated 425F oven. Turn heat down to 400F and continue roasting at 25 minutes a pound/till juices run clear. During the roasting turn the potatoes and lemons once or twice to get them brown and covered with meat juice.

                  Stunning roast. Full of flavor and very satisfying. To tell the truth this is more or less the way I roast chicken sometimes... with cloves of garlic added.

                  1. L.Nightshade RE: LulusMom Sep 8, 2011 08:52 PM

                    Chicken Salad with Watercress, Almonds, and Orange, page 83 (sort of).

                    I approximated this salad with ingredients on hand and available. I had leftover grilled chicken, which still had a little bit of (cheese-less) pesto clinging to it. The chicken, along with orange sections, goes into a dressing made of red wine vinegar, olive oil, and whole grain mustard. This goes over watercress. I can never get watercress, so used upland cress and some curly lettuce. The salad is topped with almonds and pumpkin seeds. The recipe calls for pumpkins seeds to be tossed with soy sauce and roasted. The only pumpkins seeds I could get were roasted and salted. I used them, left the salt out of the recipe, and toasted slivered almonds with low salt soy sauce. I like this technique, the soy sauce dries on the nuts, making them pretty snackable. I had to bat someone's hand away to keep enough nuts for the salad.

                    Very nice, easy salad, it worked well even with my ingredient modifications. The oranges and the toasty nuts work well with the chicken and the mustardy dressing.

                     
                    1. Gio RE: LulusMom Sep 11, 2011 07:07 AM

                      4.26 Roast Chicken Wings with Lemon and Cracked Pepper, Pg. 136, USA Ed.

                      In his introductory notes to this recipe Nigel says he doesn't like potato or corn chips but can easily put away a dozen of these wings..."whilst watching re-runs of Sex and the City." We weren't exactly mesmerized by them but the whole meal was terrific for a Saturday night's dinner whilst watching the Red Sox get toasted in Tampa.

                      The recipe calls for 12 large chicken wings weighing about 2 pounds. We used 8 large wings weighing 2 2/3 pounds. Nigel eats 12, G ate 4, I had 2 1/3. That boy must have Some appetite.

                      It's easy enough to put together: Preheat oven to 400F, put wings in a roasting pan, squeeze juice from a large lemon over them, cut lemon into pieces and along with bay leaves tuck between wings, mix cracked peppercorns with olive oil and toss with wings. Season with flaky salt and more black pepper. Roast for 45 minutes till golden brown and "sticky." It took 1 hour for our wings to get anything like golden brown but they were sticky. They turned out much lighter than the photograph in the book.

                      The taste was lemony and satisfying but I would have loved to have had a garlicky flavor as well... even though that's a much overdone flavor combination. Also, next time I'll throw everything into a deep bowl and toss all the ingredients together then set into the roasting pan, moving the cut-up lemon and bay leaves around between each wing. The side dish was Walnut Oil and New Potato Sauté, Real Fast Food page 174.

                      6 Replies
                      1. re: Gio
                        d
                        dkennedy RE: Gio Sep 13, 2011 11:02 AM

                        Chicken Stew and Mashed Potatoes, p. 78

                        My first entry this month as this is the first recipe I was motived to try out of KD. A good, but not great recipe, though I think it has the potential for greatness. You take a whole chicken, cut up into 8 pieces and marinade in olive oil, balsamic, garlic, bay laves, orange zest and herbs de Provence. Simple do ahead step. Next day drain and dry off the meat (reserve the marinade for later in the recipe), then brown the meat on both sides. The skin gets deliciously black because of the balsamic in the marinade. Set meat aside and in same pot, color the leeks. It is at this point that Slater and I go our separate ways in the recipe.

                        He would have you add the garlic back in, then the reserved marinade, cannellini beans, chicken and 5 cups of water. You cook this in the oven for two hours and add a bit more balsamic at the end. I tried it his way and though it was homey, it lacked that intangible something that turns dinner into a sole satisfying meal.

                        I think 5 cups water was way too much. I know we were seeking out a fall off the bone dish, but it really watered down the result, even after 2 hours of cooking. i think the better choice would be 2 cups water and seal the pot well. Then, instead of balsamic at the end, something more tart, perhaps a sherry vinegar, to balance the dish. Because of the beans in the dish, I think it could use a lot, and I mean a lot a lot more garlic. The idea of keeping the chicken crisp by finishing it in the oven and dumping the marinade is also a possibility. If I did this, I would serving it atop of the white bean dish, leeks, but no marinade.

                        1. re: dkennedy
                          oakjoan RE: dkennedy Sep 21, 2011 01:14 PM

                          A Curry of Aubergines, Tomatoes and Lemon Grass (without the lemon grass), p. 132 of the British edition. NOTE that I got this from Amazon and didn't see anything prominent in the ad for the book saying that it was the Brit. edition. That made me mad! I was also mad at myself for not paying closer attention. My copy of Tender IS the U.S. edition...grrrrrr.

                          This is a very nice curry which is simple and quick to make. We had it last night with some chicken thigh cutlets marinated in garam masala and garlic then sauteed, and a salad.

                          I didn't have any lemon grass and so just used a couple of squeezes of lemon. It's made with mushrooms (I used shitaki and dried porcini as I had no fresh) tomatoes, coconut milk and coriander. A spice paste is made using garlic, chillies (I used a spoonful of my Universal Condiment which is the best discovery I ever made), ginger, shallots, garlic and shrimp paste. I had no shrimp paste either and so used anchovy past. Seemed to work fine. This is all blended and then fried. Water is added and then the aubergines - chopped into chunks, tomatoes, etc.). It's simmered for 10 or 15 minutes and then coconut milk is added. Simmered for another 20 minutes or so. Served with chopped cilantro. I didn't make any rice to go with it because we'd just had rice for 3 nights running. This was quite delicious and very easy and quick.

                        2. re: Gio
                          oakjoan RE: Gio Sep 21, 2011 01:19 PM

                          Sheesh, Gio, I wish you hadn't posted that quote from Slater about watching Sex and the City. I absolutely HATE that program and have had to steel myself to keep liking him after that remark.....I will suck it up and forgive him.

                          1. re: oakjoan
                            oakjoan RE: oakjoan Sep 24, 2011 09:58 PM

                            Lemon-frosted pistachio cake - April 30, p. 146-47. This cake was a big hit at a dinner party at friends' house last night.

                            I really love cakes made with ground nuts as flour. This is ground pistachio nuts and almonds. The cake is frosted with lemon juice and powdered sugar. I served it with some vanilla low-fat frozen yoghurt I made using my Donvier. Very nice combo.

                            I am peeved, however, that my copy of Kitchen Diaries made no mention that it was the Brit. version. Maybe there isn't an American edition, but I think there is. Luckily, I have a scale so it's not that onerous.

                            1. re: oakjoan
                              Gio RE: oakjoan Sep 25, 2011 06:30 AM

                              Oakjoan there Is an American edition of Kitchen Diaries,,,I have one. All the quanties are in US measurements not British...

                              1. re: Gio
                                oakjoan RE: Gio Oct 25, 2011 04:09 PM

                                What peeved me, Gio, is that Amazon didn't make this clear.

                                In any case, I love the book and yesterday made the chocolate almond cake (p. 99 - March) for a dinner party. It was delicious and it was wolfed down by all.

                                Today I'm making the plum cake on p. 278 - September) for my husband to take to work tomorrow. It's in the oven so I haven't tasted it yet. I love that he uses almond meal in many of his cakes. I'm a big fan of that.

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