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Very Promising Korean-Chinese Noodle House

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NicoleFriedman Aug 27, 2011 10:10 PM

I'm only giving this restaurant 3 stars for now because I need to try more of their dishes but so far I'm liking it very much. I went to hit balls with my hubby at a Bayside batting cage. Instead of going to Mekong East (which as I recently reported is "meh") we tried this noodle house that we saw on the drive over. First off, we had a good feeling because we were the only non-Asians in the place (usually a good sign though I have experienced exceptions). The waiter brought over a very limited assortment of ban-chan (I'm used to at least 5 or 6 dishes in K-town and instead we were given 3). However, the noodles were excellent, both sauteed and in soup. I was unfamiliar with many of the menu items, so if anyone knows Korean-Chinese dishes, please enlighten me. My hubby tried the lo-mein and I had a thick sea-food soup (it actually was labeled thick and bland- I added in my kim-chee).

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Mekong East
43-13 Bell Blvd, Queens, NY 11361

  1. Polecat Dec 9, 2011 10:50 PM

    The translated name of this place – as per my wife – is something along the lines of “You eat Jjam Bong, I’ll eat Jja jang”, so let’s just go with what’s on the sign above the street window, which is, like the OP stated, "Korean Noodle Restaurant." It's located on 210-07 Northern Boulevard, about two blocks away from Bell. The parking around there is not bad; I'm in the area often and never have to look long for a spot.

    I hit them up for lunch today and, at around 1pm, the place was hopping with a neighborhood Korean crowd of mixed ages. It seems to be a hit with the locals. The jjam bong was good enough to warrant a repeat trip. It’s a tad better than the next best version I’ve had in recent months, over at Guh Song on Bell, in that the seafood tastes a bit more fresh – they even have crab stick in there. The noodles and broth are pretty much standard stuff - both did the trick. The fresh spinach leaves they lay on the top are a very nice touch as well.

    Naturally, the other tables of diners were pretty much all doing noodles of some kind or another, but I also spied some huge combination plates as well, with gunpunggi, fried rice and jja jang mien. I would have no problem coming back here.

    So, in all, bad name, decent food.

    P.

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    Korean Noodle Restaurant
    210-07 Northern Blvd, Queens, NY 11361

    1. Polecat Aug 30, 2011 04:04 PM

      One last shot here. Was it Guh Song?
      http://www.yelp.com/biz/guh-song-chin...

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      Guh Song
      47-24 Bell Blvd, Queens, NY 11361

      1 Reply
      1. re: Polecat
        b
        burton Sep 1, 2011 02:30 PM

        Guh Song is excellent, the best I've found in NYC (and a close second to Mandarin Restaurant in Palisades Park NJ). All of the staple dishes mentioned - jajiangmyun, jamppong, gangpungi - are done well. Place is very simple, quite bare bones but they're friendly. Not sure how I feel about the parking in back in case you're driving...may be best to find a spot on the street.

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        Guh Song
        47-24 Bell Blvd, Queens, NY 11361

      2. ramen girl Aug 29, 2011 10:39 PM

        http://www.yelp.com/biz/chinese-house...

        This is the rest.

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        Chinese House
        149-08 41st Ave, Queens, NY 11355

        12 Replies
        1. re: ramen girl
          squid kun Aug 30, 2011 12:37 AM

          This place sounds great, but if Nicole was in Bayside, it doesn't seem to be the same restaurant.

          1. re: squid kun
            ramen girl Aug 30, 2011 07:54 AM

            My mistake , something in a earlier post made me think of this place.

            Nicole , the dish you had sound like wool myun. A thick noodle with vegetable and a thick cornstarch gravy. It is supposed to be bland.

            Chinese- korean cuisine is Chinese food for koreans. Like a lot of American -chinese food the cuisine is not very authentic to any region in China.

            There is two noodle dish everyone seemed to order . Jajamyung - a brown hoisin sauce with minced pork and onion. its ultimate comfort food . Either you get it or don't. The other dish is Champong -a seafood spicy broth noodle. Most of the menu has variations of extra -spicy or more seafood etc.

            Banchan is minimal and Kimchee and Daikon is offered to satify Koreans need for having Kimchi on every meal.

            1. re: ramen girl
              Polecat Aug 30, 2011 04:11 PM

              I'll add Gganpunggi - chicken in garlic and pepper sauce - as a favorite of mine. When done well, juicy and not overly sauced, it's an excellent dish.
              p.

              1. re: Polecat
                Kurtis Aug 31, 2011 07:08 PM

                "I'll add Gganpunggi - chicken in garlic and pepper sauce - as a favorite of mine."

                Me too, and I miss it terribly at times. Haven't really searched it out much, but the version by Hyo Dong Gahk in Manhattan is quite bad. I did try one from Sam Won Gahk in Flushing which was better, but didn't hit the spot for me. What's been your find?

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                Sam Won Gahk
                144-20 Northern Blvd, Queens, NY 11354

                1. re: Kurtis
                  Polecat Aug 31, 2011 09:22 PM

                  I actually had it for lunch today from Duck Hyang (aka Duck Village), which is located on Horace Harding about a block east of Springfield. I work around the corner so the joint is convenient for me. Their version is slightly sweet and not overly sauced. I don't have it enough to really make comparisons and have not had a version that's really knocked my socks off. If they don't glop the sauce on and let the chicken shine through, I'll take it.

                  China House, the joint that Ramen Girl references above, is rumored to have a decent version.

                  P.

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                  Duck Village
                  221-34 Horace Harding Expy, Queens, NY 11364

                  1. re: Polecat
                    Kurtis Sep 1, 2011 04:10 AM

                    "If they don't glop the sauce on and let the chicken shine through, I'll take it."

                    Yeah, somehow and often the gooey sauce made it into this dish in many places that is very different than ones in my memory that triggers craving now and then: lightly coated crisp black peppered batter with minced garlic and just a few large chunks of veges. No sauce and not sweet. Dipped into soy sauce+vinegar to cool it off a bit before the bite.

                    Will have to try China House soon. Thanks.

              2. re: ramen girl
                scoopG Aug 31, 2011 02:57 PM

                Chinese- korean cuisine is Chinese food for koreans. Like a lot of American -chinese food the cuisine is not very authentic to any region in China.
                __________________________________

                I think it is more complicated than that. There also seems to be an explosion of these Korean-Chinese or Chinese-Korean restaurants in recent years in Flushing. Yanbian is the Korean Autonomous Prefecture in China's Jilin province with a population of two million.

                Rifu:
                http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/730210

                1. re: scoopG
                  Kurtis Aug 31, 2011 05:11 PM

                  Majority of Chinese who settled in South Korea dating back from pre 1900s are from Shandong China, and while the food evolved over time, it has its origin from that region from what I hear.

                  I've had many different Korean versions of Jajangmyun - sauce is made with black bean paste - as well as Chinese and Japanese versions, and though all of them have their uniqueness, they sure are definition of comfort food.

                  Secret : Sam Won Gahk will give you a small bowl of jjampong broth along with an order of jajangmyun if you ask nicely; a combo that satisfies both yin and yang in a way that nothing else can. In fact, a half serving of each is often offered as a meal in Korea.

                  Edit: looks like Chinese House has this combo...
                  http://www.yelp.com/biz_photos/gl1p0g...

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                  Sam Won Gahk
                  144-20 Northern Blvd, Queens, NY 11354

                  1. re: Kurtis
                    scoopG Aug 31, 2011 06:12 PM

                    Majority of Chinese who settled in South Korea dating back from pre 1900s are from Shandong China, and while the food evolved over time, it has its origin from that region from what I hear.
                    _________________________
                    Chinese-Korean relations go well back more than one thousand years - hence the current dispute over the true mythical origins and "ownership" of Mt. Changbai /Mt. Paekdu. I have seen no historical evidence that this food originated in Shandong. If you have it I'd love to see it!

                    1. re: scoopG
                      Kurtis Aug 31, 2011 06:32 PM

                      This is not a bad way to learn a bit of history while salivating over these dishes. I searched online and found these:

                      On Chinese in Korea:
                      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_people_in_Korea

                      On Korean Chinese Cuisine:
                      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_C...
                      (mentioned proudly is Queens

                      )

                      As the ownership of bordering lands exchanged hands many times, disputes are bound to occur, and authenticity can be blurred along that line too.

                      1. re: Kurtis
                        scoopG Sep 1, 2011 04:07 AM

                        Chinese history via wikipedia? There are far better and more accurate sources than that!

                        1. re: scoopG
                          Kurtis Sep 1, 2011 05:56 AM

                          Oh scoopG, I rather have you help me find some soul-soothing Gganpunggi than to debate this here ;)

                          I am sure there are better sources, but many take wikipedia to be a valuable resource as a starting point, just as Chowhound's collective information is.

          2. Polecat Aug 28, 2011 06:49 AM

            You got a name? Location? Cross streets? Was this in the immediate vicinity of Mekong East or elsewhere in Bayside?

            Some Korean-Chinese staples include Jjam-pong, a spicy noodle soup (I get mine with seafood) and jian jiang mien (noodles in a thick brown sauce).

            The only Korean-Chinese I know of in the Bayside area are Sam Wan Gwak, on Northern near Little Neck/Douglaston, and Duck Hyang, on Horace Harding in Oakland Gardens.

            P.

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            Sam Won Gahk
            219-01 Northern Blvd, Queens, NY 11361

            Mekong East
            43-13 Bell Blvd, Queens, NY 11361

            Duck Village
            221-34 Horace Harding Expy, Queens, NY 11364

            1 Reply
            1. re: Polecat
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              NicoleFriedman Aug 28, 2011 10:44 AM

              Sorry:} It was literally called "Korean Noodle House". I can't recall the exact address but it was in or near Bayside NY.

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