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Pots and pans that are not too heavy

Monica Aug 17, 2011 07:07 AM

My mom is still using the old ones with teflon coating, etc so I want to get her a new set.
She was at my house and held some of my pots and pans..-all of them are All-clad stainless steel and cast iron. She goes, how do you cook with these things...better use them as weapons.
So any good pots and pans that are not too heavy yet safe to use?

  1. s
    skyline Aug 17, 2011 07:50 AM

    Farberware Classic stainless are extremely durable but not too heavy. Having a bad wrist I can relate to your mom's comment. :-)

    The plastic handles on the Farberware do help to keep the weight of the pans down. Once you get into pans with the metal handles (such as the Henckels Classic Clad and others) the added weight is noticeable, however they can of course go into the oven with no worries if that's an issue.

    FYI, be aware that the Paula Deen label line of pots is nothing more than Farberware with a thin coating of copper on the bottom (which does nothing functional to improve cooking), a different kind of plastic for the handles, and dressed-up lids. A friend of mine recommended a Paula Deen steamer pot which is nothing more than the identical Farberware pots with a few cosmetic bells and whistles slapped on, along with a higher pricetag:

    http://www.amazon.com/Paula-Deen-Quart-Steamer-Stainless/dp/B001CX5ODC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1313592471&sr=8-1
    versus
    http://www.amazon.com/Farberware-Clas...

    Henckels Classic Clad are great pans but definitely heavier than the Farberware. Less expensive than AllClad and its brethren though.

    3 Replies
    1. re: skyline
      Monica Aug 17, 2011 07:57 AM

      Wow, this is exactly what I am looking for. Good products at great prices..=)
      Thanks so much for the recommendation.
      Hopefully my mom will get rid of her old pots and pans when i get her these but I am sure I will see her cooking with her old pots again...saying, they are still good and useable.

      1. re: skyline
        p
        Plano Rose Aug 17, 2011 10:45 AM

        I'm likely older than your mother (75) and have some arthritis. I absolutely love the Farberware stailess steel line. Though I wouldn't necessarily recommend doing so, I have put my 8 qt. stockpot in a 400 degree oven and it survived.

        1. re: skyline
          g
          GiGiofRVA Aug 17, 2011 02:23 PM

          Have you looked at Cuisinart? They are available at Costco or Sams, I think. My daughter and another friend have them and they are pleased.

        2. e
          E_M Aug 17, 2011 10:55 AM

          We have the Faberware Classic with the plastic handles, and I would advise NOT to buy that saute pan. I would get one with a metal handle so that you could put it in the oven (I wouldn't think that you'd have a need to put their pots in the oven, so that doesn't matter.)

          However, if you're looking for something a bit heftier, and I think a bit better quality, look at American Kitchen, made by Regalware. American-made, nice design with capacity markings, VERY reasonably priced.

          1. s
            skyline Aug 17, 2011 04:38 PM

            Just a thought for the OP: Before buying new pieces for you mom, take note of the kind of handles that are on her current ones. I don't know how fussy she is about handles (I am a major PITA about them, LOL) but if the handle shape/style varies dramatically from what she is used to, she may not like the new pans for that reason. Not the stockpots of course, but the frying, saute, and saucepans.

            I really dislike the flattish handles that are so prevalent on certain brands, including the Cuisinart stainless. The Farberware Classic handles are fine, as are these which we also have. You can see by looking at the pans that substantial handle with at least some contour all around (not just an indentation on the top of it) is the only kind I like:

            http://www.amazon.com/Henckels-International-Classic-1-Quart-Saucier/dp/B000HAX2NK/ref=sr_1_7?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1313624021&sr=1-7 (the handle looks weird but amazingly it is among the most comfortable I have ever held

            )

            http://www.amazon.com/Scanpan-Classic-Ceramic-Titanium-3-Quart/dp/B00004S4UI/ref=sr_1_10?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1313624217&sr=1-10

            http://www.amazon.com/Tools-Trade-Bel...

            It might also be possible that your mom may not like metal handles on saucepans, etc (some people don't, no matter what the contours are). So this would be a wise thing to check out first. :-)

            1. n
              Ninevah Aug 17, 2011 08:43 PM

              My mother just bought an Excel Steel cast iron skillet. It's really quite a nice piece. You get the benefits of CI, with maybe a quarter of the weight.

              http://www.amazon.com/ExcelSteel-Inch...

              1. mlou72 Aug 18, 2011 12:12 PM

                You might also help her to find ones that are well balanced rather than just considering the weight. For myself I've found a good handle and good balance make a heavy pan so much more manageable. I'm with your mom, I think All-Clad is made by 6 foot tall me for 6 foot tall men. They sure are nice, but are just too much for me to handle.

                I love my Anolon pans because they have a contoured silicone grip on the handle. I also love the Technique line from QVC (just as good quality, but cheaper because it's their own high end brand). Both are made by Meyer. My pans still look brand new and have excellent performance.

                1. w
                  will47 Aug 18, 2011 03:46 PM

                  Some of the older cast iron is thinner / lighter than the stuff available now. I have a Griswold #10 skillet which is less than 4.5 lb. Thinner carbon steel pans can also be pretty light, though the De Buyer Mineral line is actually quite heavy. All-Clad is less heavy than, say, Demeyere, but still not light. I'm guessing that All-Clad's MC2 series, which is mostly aluminum except for the interior, might be lighter than their lines which have more layers of stainless steel.

                  Most good pots / pans are a bit on the heavy side. I agree with the comment about finding pans which are well balanced and, in the case of large ones, have helper handles.

                  2 Replies
                  1. re: will47
                    i
                    INDIANRIVERFL Aug 22, 2011 01:30 PM

                    You can always go back to what was the high end cookware when she was a bride.

                    Reverware.

                    1. re: INDIANRIVERFL
                      s
                      skyline Aug 22, 2011 02:11 PM

                      They still make Revereware?! JK, LOL

                      I am not being snarky, btw. As a Baby Boomer myself, I remember a number of things that were in my parents' kitchen that were every bit as good OR better than their modern-day counterparts.

                      The GOOD, oven-safe Pyrex glassware comes immediately to mind, for instance. I hear the modern version is disconcertingly prone to spectacular shattering on occasion.

                      Not to mention the original Electrolux vacuum cleaners, compared to the ridiculous crappy pieces of junk masquerading as Electrolux vacs in the big box stores today.

                      But getting back to Revereware, the vintage American-made ones were a totally different breed of cat from the made in China thin modern stuff. You're right: back in the day, Revereware WAS high end! And if it were still made today in the USA to the same specs as before, it probably still would be. But sadly, as so many other once-respected brands have done, it slid down the great outsourcing sinkhole.

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