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Has Tertulia opened yet?

Or does anyone know when it will open?
Also, is it crazy to contemplate a visit early in its existence?

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Tertulia
359 6th Ave, New York, NY 10011

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  1. According to Twitter, opened last night.

    1. Like Kathryn said, it opened last night.

      In regard to your second question, it's not like restaurants flip a switch three months into things (or whenever) that magically makes them better. If you want to go, go. I'm planning on stopping in sometime within the next couple of weeks because it's a type of food that's interesting to me and I live in the area.

      1. Walked in last night for a pre-hurricane dinner and were seated immediately, just before 7pm. We stuck mostly to the tapas portions of the menu as I wanted to see how it compared to Boqueria.

        Pan con tomate was OK. Bread wasn't grilled, which I thought it would be. Not a huge fan of using multigrain peasant-y bread for pan con tomate, either. Really liked the jamon iberico bellota. I think it may have been hand cut as the thickness varied from piece to piece and you could kind of see the knife trails. Pimientos de Padron were also good, a little bit on the saltier side, but not too salty. Nuestra Patatas were only OK. More like home fries covered in Spanish paprika, with an aioli on top. I was hoping for more of a patatas bravas treatment where the pimenton is in the aioli itself. Grilled clams with salsa verde and white beans and lots of garlic and parsley were awesome, though. And we loved the jamon croquettas, served with a kind of fig sauce on the bottom.

        I'd probably skip the pan con tomate and nuestras patatas next time, and focus more on the other cooked dishes. A promising addition to the neighborhood.

        As we left around 8pm, there appeared to be a short wait for tables.

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        Boqueria
        53 W 19th St, New York, NY 10011

        3 Replies
        1. re: kathryn

          Went back recently, and had a very good meal. Jamon iberico to start with, and also pimientos de padron. We also ordered one of the daily specials: iberico pork ribs, with cucumber dill salad. Not a huge portion but very tasty, and cooked over their wood-fired grill. Excellent spicy mussels cooked in cider. But the real show stopper was the Arroz a la Plancha: crispy Calasparra rice, snails, wild mushrooms, celery, fennel, Ibérico ham. For dessert, apple crepes, with cider. All washed down with a bottle of txakolina. Delicious, and it certainly does appear to be a great addition to the neighborhood.

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          Tertulia
          359 6th Ave, New York, NY 10011

          1. re: kathryn

            Just got back from another good dinner here. Loved the jamon iberico de bellota, as usual. Tried the mushroom toast with smoked ricotta, pine nuts, and it was only good, but the sardine toast was fantastic. Served on a cracker, black and white anchovies, slow-roasted tomato, sheep’s milk cheese, aged balsamic. Sweet, savory, lots of umami. Delicious!

            Arroz a la Plancha was just as good as the previous visits. And we also loved the percebes, gooseneck barnacles, a delicacy from Northern Spain, served on toast with garlic, parsley. I hope this daily special sticks around for a while. Finished with some nice torrija (Spanish french toast), heavily carmelized. They stick an iron in the grill for a while and then finish it that way instead of using a torch. Served with salted/roasted hazelnuts and hazelnut ice cream. Very good but not quite as good as Txikito's version which I believe is soaked in custard before cooking. Still, a great meal overall! No space for the cojonudo, sadly, or the crispy cauliflower with tripe, or the whole turbot or house-smoked trout on toast! Can't wait to try their churros con chocolate at brunch.

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            Txikito
            240 9th Ave, New York, NY 10001

            1. re: kathryn

              Tertulia is great. I've enjoyed the whole turbot, tortilla espanola, and ham croquettes. Can't wait to try the arroz a la plancha and some of your other recs.

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              Tertulia
              359 6th Ave, New York, NY 10011

          2. Had yet another fantastic dinner here -- great jamon iberico as usual. Continue to love the sardine toast (black and white anchovies, slow-roasted tomato, sheep’s milk cheese, aged balsamic). But my new favorite toast is the "huevo roto": crushed soft boiled egg, potato chunks, slivers of Ibérico ham on top. Creamy, eggy, savory, cheesy, SO GOOD. I need another one of these right now!

            We tried to lighten it up with a very creative salad of grilled kale, grilled squash, raw kale, cheese, mushrooms, and a mushroom vinaigrette. The grilled lamb breast was excellent with creamy cauliflower and roasted cauliflower. Tender and fatty, like falling apart tender. Finished it off with a special of grilled chopitos (good but tiny portion, GREAT grilled flavor, good char, very small and sweet and meaty) and some Spanish French toast.

            But: huevo roto. That was the highlight of my night!

            1. I prefer kathryn's, but sam sifton has also written a complimentary/complementary review of tertulia:
              http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/05/din...

              1. We had a good but not great brunch here this weekend. Relaxed, quiet. Excellent and very sweet service. Nice freshly squeezed OJ.

                Good churros, crispy, but they were just a bit too sweet and maybe a tiny bit not fluffy enough--here in the US they always seem to dust churros with sugar, and I never had them that way in Spain. Chocolate was good but not bitter or thick enough, but definitely on the higher end of the quality spectrum.

                Interesting Bloody Mary with anchovy, Spanish peppers, tomato blended in the base of the drink, but not really all that identifiable as a Bloddy Mary. It was a bright orange color. Tasted more like a soup to me. Very odd.

                Enjoyed a chorizo side as well - salty and flavorful, loosely held together in terms of texture, a little greasy. I liked my sandwich of crushed boiled eggs, potatoes, jamon iberico. Says mini on menu, seemed normal size to me. It was a variation of the huevo roto they serve at dinner, which I personally think is better, as at dinner it's a toast. As a sandwich the texture of the jamon iberico gets a little lost. The breakfast sandwich of egg, bacon, avocado, served with a side of nuestras patatas was good, too, but not amazing.

                Overall, brunch is nice, but dinner is still where it's at IMO.

                3 Replies
                1. re: kathryn

                  Great, great set of reviews, Kathryn. It's so helpful to see, over time, how this place unwraps for you.

                  Is the arroz a la plancha one of their strongest dishes, do you think?

                  1. re: michelleats

                    It is very good but last time the rice was slightly under-charred, which may have been a minor mis-step. I still haven't gotten enough people together to try the paella, though.

                    I think my ideal meal there would consist of the broken egg toast, sardine toast, jamon croquettas, something with shellfish, and the secreto iberico. But we have been trying new dishes each time.

                    1. re: kathryn

                      Thanks! I'll keep these suggestions in mind. We were actually on our way to Tertulio, tonight, but somehow got sidetracked and went to Maialino, instead. Now we'll be able to go better prepared.

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                      Maialino
                      2 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY 10010

                2. Finally made it to Tertulia last night. Full review with pics here: http://www.girleatscity.com/2011/10/t...

                  We ordered two tostas from the "embutidos, quesos y tostas" portion of the menu and four tapas from the "tapas y sartenes" section. The two tostas and the tortilla española tapa came very quickly, but there was nearly an hour's wait before the remainder of our dishes came. It's hard to hold this delay against the kitchen, since they were very clearly swamped and it must be overwhelming to have waves of hungry diners pouring in all at once. But crikey, we were hungry!

                  The first tosta, called the cojonudo... revisited / two bites of smoked pig cheek, quail egg and pepper, was just fantastic. ("Cojonudo" means, roughly, "f-ing great" in Spanish and the name is accurate in this case.) There was just the right amount of fatty, flavorful, salty pig cheek, sliced very thin, Spain's answer to guanciale. There were quail eggs fried sunny side down (whites fully cooked, egg yolks just beyond runny, but not fully cooked). These were layered on oily, toasted flatbread and then garnished with a few leaves of flat leaf parsley, a tiny touch that made all the difference in the world. The parsley brought into focus, and allowed one to appreciate, the richness of the other ingredients. Cojonudo. Seriously.

                  Our next tosta was the tosta huevo roto y jamón ibérico / crushed egg, potato, Ibérico ham. We had an issue with the Iberico ham all evening. It was slightly rancid, though it would've been beautiful had it not been for that slight hint of rancidness. This was nevertheless a well conceived and delicious snack, with the ham layered over rosti-like shredded potatoes, soft boiled eggs and more of the toasted, oily flatbread.

                  I order tortilla at every Spanish tapas place I walk into, since I love this dish and it's a good benchmark for comparing kitchens: EVERY tapas bar has it. The "nuestra tortilla española" was a solid, traditional version made with the usual egg, potato, onion and olive oil. It was served a little bit too cold, but was wholly serviceable. Tertulia's version is not as good as the much lesser known Caliu's, interestingly, where the kitchen is helmed by Franco Barrio, another Boqueria alumnus. But Barrio does cheat a little: his is warm, fluffy, and served with a lot of alioli to liven things up.

                  By and by, our order of chipirones a la plancha / baby squid, mustard greens, pine nuts, grilled Poblano vinaigrette came to the table, sweeping away whatever grouchiness had began to set in from lack of food. It was another stellar dish, a wonderful balance of excellent, fresh, tender greens; warm squid, the tentacles of which had been breaded and deep fried; and a very light sprinkling of pine nuts. Squid was remarkably flavorful through and through, even the rings, which hadn't been breaded and fried. I'd call these "cojonudo chipirones" if I were writing the menu.

                  The merluza a la plancha / wild merluza a la plancha, smoked pig cheek, cranberry beans featured some of the most robustly flavorful, delicious cranberry beans I've ever had. They were thoroughly infused with smoked, meaty goodness. The merluza, though well cooked with a lovely, crisp skin, just wasn't to my taste, however. Merluza (a type of hake) is a bland fish, even less interesting than tilapia, and the dish relied on the liberal dose of smoked pig cheek for flavor.

                  The arroz a la plancha / Calasparra rice, snails, wild mushrooms, celery, fennel, Ibérico ham was, however, dreamy if you ignored the slightly rancid Iberico ham. The rice was wonderful, cooked to a state more similar to risotto than to paella, lightly scented with cheese, shaped into a large, oval log and baked in the wood-burning stove. There were a few chewy-tender snails and some meaty bits of what tasted to me like shiitake mushrooms incorporated into the rice. Celery leaves and acidic, thin slices of fennel bulb topped the log. To me, the pickled fennel wasn't really necessary, since the brightness of the celery leaves did a fine job of cutting through the salt and fat by themselves, and the acidity of the fennel was a little jarring.

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                  Overall, the kitchen puts out some very good food, but the restaurant is probably a bit overhyped. I probably won't be going nearly as frequently as Kathryn -- at least not until some of the hype dies down. I really just don't enjoy contending with crowds at very trendy places.

                  HungryRubia, I hope you've had your chance to go! If you go around 5:45 or so, you should be able to be seated more easily, though you'll probably be at one of the communal tables. (The initial line at the door will've been seated, so right after opening is your best bet for minimizing wait time. I haven't tried to go very late, but you could also try at an "off" hour like 11 p.m.) Please do report back if you go. I'd love to hear your take.

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                  Boqueria
                  53 W 19th St, New York, NY 10011

                  Caliu
                  557 Hudson Street, New York, NY 10014

                  Tertulia
                  359 6th Ave, New York, NY 10011

                  1. We had a great special there on Friday night. Long Island pheasant leg. Hunted by the kitchen staff. Cooked duck confit style, served on a bed of lentils, butternut squash, and wild mushrooms, AND roasted foie gras, AND black truffles. There may have also been some pork belly in there too.

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                    Tertulia
                    359 6th Ave, New York, NY 10011