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Gluten Free snacks

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A bunch of my friends are getting together to play games in about a week. One of them has a gluten allergy. Normally when we get together, we potluck a bunch of snack foods, with my normal being baked goods. This leaves me in a quandary, since I refuse to make something I know someone can't/won't eat, but I need something easy for people to eat, transportable, and no prep work on the other end. Does anyone know of any resources for me to start looking through that would be gluten free, or has any recipes that they're willing to pass on. I'd be really grateful if someone could tell me the most reliable method to change my current recipes over to gluten free. Last time I found an almond bar with chocolate chips to take, but this time I want something different.

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  1. My sister has celiac, so I know what you're dealing with! I know it's not exciting, but there is a Betty Crocker gluten-free brownie in a box, that is the best one we've found yet, and we've tried them all. You could jazz that up with add-ins or toppings. Also Nut-Thin crackers are a good GF cracker (the almond are best), and they can be used as a base for other things. Changing recipes gets really iffy. Best to use a GF cookbook, but gathering all the ingredients for one occasion could get expensive. "Cooking for Isaiah" by Silvana Nardone is really reliable. There are also tons of GF websites with recipes and hints. Keep in mind that GF does not mean dairy free, etc (unless your friend has other allergies). Lots of people go overboard and try to eliminate everything that might cause an allergy, and limit their options too much. Best of luck!

    1. Here is one: Blue Cheese dip/salad dressing, and pork rinds for dipping.
      Blue Cheese, crumbled, sour cream, parsley, dash of Cayenne pepper, garlic powder, salt & pepper. Thin it to the consistency you need with milk or cream. Keeps a week in the refrig, or longer.
      A good Low Carb recipe too!!

      1. You're so sweet! I'm GF, and I tell the friends who really want to cook for me to spare themselves and just learn how to find naturally GF recipes. For example - meringues, pavlova, a zillion Passover recipes (I'm not Jewish but I am learning to really appreciate Passover!), almond flour or chestnut flour based traditional desserts, fruit desserts, flourless cakes, cheesecakes (just skip the crust or use a nut crust), flan, mochi cake.... That way you're not buying expensive flours you rarely use (well, ok, not everyone has chestnut flour, I'm a freak - but ya know, us GF'ers tend to stock a lot of stuff) and you're not worried about gums or flax seed and you often have generations of recipe history to rely on.

        http://smittenkitchen.com/2008/04/17-...
        http://www.davidlebovitz.com/2007/01/... (chocolate idiot cake = YUM
        )http://bakingbites.com/2008/04/flourl...
        http://comeonilene.com/2011/04/11/moc... (you can get mochi flour in the regular grocery store, cheap! and everyone likes this
        )http://glutenfreegirl.com/yum-yum-pea... (works with almond butter too - don't overbake!)

        1. Oh, and the most reliable method to change over recipes? Shauna explains it all here: http://glutenfreegirl.com/gluten-free... This is the modern way to do it, and you know what -- it does work. Trust a quality GF flour blend and careful measurement by weight, and you're good. This might mean that you need to figure out what your beloved cookie recipe is by weight first, but hey, that's a small price to pay. These days I tend to gravitate to European recipes (already done by metric weight) and then convert to GF, and it works great. I don't even use gums. I do sometimes add ground flax or chia slurry.

          1. Ohh, so many goodies to choose from. Thanks all. I'm feeling a lot more comfortable with my options.
            I needed a reason to switch to weighing my flours anyway, so figuring them out for conversion is a good starting point.

            1. If you're in a big enough city that may have a store that specializes in Brazilian fare, you can do pao de queijo, which translates to cheese bread, although no gluten is used. (no flour, rather it's made with manioc and cheese) Many Brazilian specialty stores will sell them already made and frozen, you simply need to spray Pam on baking sheet and bake on 350 for 30 minutes.

              To make them yourself, you can use some of the recipes you find online, but it won't be the same unless you're able to find the Brazilian ingreadients.

              We recently had a friend over with celiac and she loved these things! (and didn't get sick!)