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Offer to purchase Screaming Eagle

r
rinkatink888 Aug 3, 2011 08:36 AM

I received an email indicating my name has been moved to the top of their waiting list and, if interested, my first allocation, will be the 2009 vintage, which will be offered in the Spring 2012 at the price of $2,250.00 per three pack. Any opinions if the price is worth it and what do you think are the possibilities of reselling one or two botles of the wines?

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  1. p
    pinotho RE: rinkatink888 Aug 3, 2011 09:52 AM

    you will be able to resell if Robet Parker gives the 09 wine a high rating. Oh, since you asked for an opinion as to whether a bottle of wine is worth $750, then mine is a big NO !

    1. s
      sedimental RE: rinkatink888 Aug 3, 2011 10:55 AM

      You can always sell Screaming Eagle- but maybe you should ask yourself "what for"?

      The old adage in wine collecting was "buy three, drink free"- meaning if you could buy SE for 2250 and sell two bottles for 1125 each (or 1 bottle for 2250 *much later*) - then you win! If that is what you are after, then there is a good chance you could do just that....or at least come darn close to make "Screagle" more way more affordable for you to drink (always a good goal!). Of course, there is a bit of a hassle selling only one or two bottles of wine.

      If your intention is to make a decent profit on it- nope, likely you won't. Making decent profit in wine reselling these days is much harder than ever before. That is not to say that you "can't" make money-but I would gamble more on it if I wanted to drink free or less expensively -rather than to make a few bucks.

      1. z
        zin1953 RE: rinkatink888 Aug 3, 2011 06:42 PM

        >>> Any opinions if the price is worth it . . . <<<
        -- In terms of the liquid within the bottle? Oh, hell no!
        -- In terms of hype/greed/lust? As always, it's whatever the market will bear.

        >>> . . . and what do you think are the possibilities of reselling one or two botles of the wines? <<<
        The possibilities are extremely high, depending upon the price you're asking. Offer them for $500 each, and they'll disappear in a heartbeat. Offer them at $5,000 each, and it will take quite some time to sell them, but -- hey! who knows? -- you may find some @$$ to actually spend that much . . . I mean, it's doubtful, but stranger things have happened.

        My guiding philosophy when it comes to purchasing wine has always been to drink what I buy. Period. Now, admittedly, I am somewhat "old school" in that I've been buying Bordeaux (for example) since the 1967s and 1970s were new releases, so that may prejudice my point-of-view, but every bottle in my cellar I have purchased with the intention of opening it myself.

        Cheers,
        Jason

        4 Replies
        1. re: zin1953
          s
          sedimental RE: zin1953 Aug 3, 2011 09:11 PM

          " I am somewhat "old school" in that I've been buying Bordeaux (for example) since the 1967s and 1970s were new releases, so that may prejudice my point-of-view"

          Well sure it does! You are old :) Like me...and aren't you glad you are?

          There is no way anyone now- can purchase anything "classically" *great* without spending hundreds (or thousands) of dollars for one bottle. It is a shame. Not that Screagle is a classic per se...but it is a cult wine and I think all wine lovin' fools should have a taste of cult wines & classic wines. All us old farts have! Soap box ahead:

          The only option would be to buy three and drink free, but the "drink free" part is more likely to be "drink cheaper" or "drink at all". These release prices are out of this world! ANY vintage Screagle is selling for around $1,000.00 per bottle for an internet "bargain" price and that is *only* if you shop around. A Ch. Mouton is cheaper and a Ch Latour is the same price. REALLY? I am disgusted just to type that. If I had never had- but wanted to- experience a Screaming Eagle- I would buy three and sell two....or buy three and sell one..and trade one for a Latour. I think wheeling and dealing is the only way to be able to afford to experience these kinds of wines anymore. End of soapbox :)

          1. re: sedimental
            s
            sedimental RE: sedimental Aug 3, 2011 09:45 PM

            I am terrible at photo sharing but I have been trying to practice....lets see if I can do this:

            http://i474.photobucket.com/albums/rr...

            Ch Margaux release price (sale) from importer.

            1. re: sedimental
              z
              zin1953 RE: sedimental Aug 4, 2011 08:25 AM

              Danger! Danger! Warning, Will Robinson -- Thread Drift approaching!

              So as you probably already know, I grew up in the California wine trade -- my uncle opened up a wine shop back in the days everyone else had a liquor store. Now . . . I heard this story from my uncle, but --

              Back in 1977, I was in Bordeaux on a pleasure/business trip, and I arrived a day early. This being my first trip there, I just drove through the region, thrilled at seeing all these famous estates that I'd heard of for so long, when I passed Château Prieuré-Lichine and a sign reading "Dégustation et Vente" (Tasting & Sales). On a whim, I stopped . . .

              After an employee of the estate showed me the winemaking facilities, we walked across the courtyard to the tasting room, but stopped behind a group of 4-5 people. One was very tall, with his back to us; the others all shook his hand and left. When the tall gentleman turned around, I recognized him as Alexis Lichine. We were introduced, and he immediately repeated my name aloud, and said, "You write for 'Wine World,' don't you? You wrote that article on -- " and proceeded to name four or five articles I'd written. I was dumbstruck! I'd been reading Lichine's books since literally the age of 10, and he knew who I was?!?!?!? My God!

              He invited me to join him for lunch, and over the course of the meal, he told me this little story about my uncle.

              Lichine was in Los Angeles to sell 1961 vintage Bordeaux, but no one was buying! He told me that "everyone had loaded up on the 1959s ('Vintage of the Century!'), and so no one wanted the 1961s -- no one but your uncle. He simply asked, 'Are they that good?' and when I said yes, he bought!

              "And you know how much they were," he asked me. Now, as I said, I'd heard part of this story from my uncle, but I didn't -- couldn't! -- believe him, so I simply shook my head. Lichine continued, "The First Growths were $30/case -- except for Lafite. It was expensive, $36/case!"

              Now, California was a Fair Trade state at the time, and so that meant that 1961 Château Lafite Rothschild sold -- in stores (not on futures) -- for $4.50 per bottle. The others were $3.75 . . .

              So, you can understand: I absolutely agree with you that there is no way people today can taste and purchase anything like the number of great wines I have been fortunate, and privileged, to taste and purchase . . . and why I've never had to "flip" or "sell 3 and drink for free."

              End of soapbox? End of an era!

              Cheers,
              Jason

              1. re: zin1953
                j
                jock RE: zin1953 Aug 4, 2011 09:09 AM

                Back in 1963-65 the 1961 firsts were completely out of my price range as a grad student. I could, however, afford "lesser" classified growths for about $2 - thus began a life-long obsession.

                Last night we tasted 2004,5,6,7 Copain James Barry Syrahs. All big demand culty, it that's a word, wines. For my tastes, and most of the group, they were wines I would not drink at any price. Frankly, the same goes for Screagle.

                OTOH 1996 Rafanelli Cab last Monday was very nice. Alcohol of "only" 13.9% just wouldn't cut it these days. I'm too damn old!

        2. j
          jock RE: rinkatink888 Aug 4, 2011 08:09 AM

          From what I hear almost anyone on the wait list got the offer this year. Giant red flag. I seriously doubt buying SE for flipping from this vintage forward will be a successful strategy.

          3 Replies
          1. re: jock
            Eugene Park RE: jock Aug 4, 2011 02:43 PM

            It would only be a successful strategy if the '09 gets a 100 point rating from both Parker and Wine Spec (and maybe Suckling). Even then, at a $750 cost/bottle it won't sell for a large amount higher on the secondary market. I'm basing this on seeing the '07 (100 RP, 97 WS) vintage selling at auction for $600/bottle, or thereabouts.

            1. re: Eugene Park
              skylineR33 RE: Eugene Park Aug 4, 2011 03:44 PM

              Screaming Eagle 2007 for $600/bottle ?! Are you kidding ? Maybe a bad condition bottle ? I saw one sold at the Klwines auction for $1825 a few months ago.

              1. re: skylineR33
                Eugene Park RE: skylineR33 Aug 4, 2011 04:05 PM

                Gah!! My bad. I was thinking of Scarecrow, not ScrEagle. Got my cult wineries mixed up today.

          2. r
            rinkatink888 RE: rinkatink888 Aug 4, 2011 08:40 AM

            Thank you everyone for some very insightful information.

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