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Savoy Cabbage--Any Interesting Recipes other than cole slaw?

d
DaisyM Aug 2, 2011 02:15 PM

Thank you.

  1. huiray Aug 3, 2011 06:32 PM

    I use it in much the same way as I would use ordinary green cabbage, or in some cases as I would use Napa cabbage (wong nga pak). No "special" recipes for it. Soups, wraps, stews, stir-fries, sauteed combinations, in omelettes or other similar dishes, as replacement for sauerkraut w/ kielbasa, stuffed w/ some meat combination or other, etc etc etc.

    1. Karl S Aug 3, 2011 02:43 PM

      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/7025...

      7 Replies
      1. re: Karl S
        Caitlin McGrath Aug 3, 2011 06:21 PM

        That dish, smothered cabbage, Venetian style, which Karl links to a previous post about (including instructions) is also my favorite. The cabbage becomes so tender, a bit melt-in-your-mouth after long cooking. It's a great bed for something braised or grilled, or just served with browned sausages.

        1. re: Caitlin McGrath
          Karl S Aug 4, 2011 05:32 AM

          And, as I noted in the original comment, it's also great mixed with pasta like linguine, in the grand tradition of cabbage-and-noodle dishes that is a marker of central European influences on the cuisine of northeast Italy.

          1. re: Karl S
            huiray Aug 4, 2011 11:02 AM

            Try some finely cut savoy cabbage & shaved fennel bulb sauteed w/ a little smashed garlic in the best olive oil you have, add drained sliced marinated artichoke hearts, then toss with some nice fresh pasta - linguine or similar. Salt to taste. NO CHEESE.

            1. re: huiray
              Karl S Aug 4, 2011 11:58 AM

              How about toasted breadcrumbs....?

              1. re: Karl S
                huiray Aug 4, 2011 12:19 PM

                If you like. :-)

              2. re: huiray
                huiray Aug 4, 2011 12:27 PM

                Lunch today:

                Sliced pork tenderloin & sliced kielbasa domowa, sauteed w/ smashed garlic & generous olive oil; add chopped ripe tomatoes*, stir, cover; add a ladle of pork bone stock [heavy in porkiness & gelatin], stir, cover, simmer; add flor de sal, stir, add shredded cabbage, stir, cover, simmer; add a few splashes of rice vinegar, stir; add fistfuls of trimmed basil** (lots!), stir, add 3/4 cooked fresh spaghettini, stir & toss.

                Eat. :-)

                * I used a Black Krim and a few Eva Purple Balls.
                ** Genovese

                1. re: huiray
                  huiray Aug 7, 2011 12:14 PM

                  Lunch today:

                  Leftover phở stock, chiffonade of savoy cabbage, trimmed Thai basil, shaved ribeye, tendon pieces & reserved picked-off meat from beef bones, chopped scallions & cilantro, sliced yellow (fried) bean curd.

        2. linguafood Aug 3, 2011 01:34 PM

          German-style -- sliced thinly, then sautéed in bacon fat, add some white wine, cover and braise.

          Oops. Almost forgot.... doesn't hurt to add a touch of cream later on...

          1. buttertart Aug 3, 2011 08:23 AM

            Marcella Hazan's divine beef-prosciutto cabbage rolls braised in white wine from "Marcella's Italian Kitchen".

            6 Replies
            1. re: buttertart
              jen kalb Aug 3, 2011 08:50 AM

              That sounds great1

              One of my favorate Marcella Recipe variations is savoy (or other cabbage) shredded and sauteed in olive oil with chopped garic until tender and then mixedd with freshly boiled and drained shortgrain rice (arborio, carnaroli, kohuoka rose or whatever), shredded mozzarella cheese, grated parmigiano reggiano and a big handful of chopped parsley.

              I think marcella is fussier about the cooking of the cabbage than I am - cutting into squares and boiling it first - but IMO the saute in olive oil with the garlic until tender works just as well.

              I fed this to my 88 yr old Mom recently who has had limited exposure to these kind of flavors and she was astounded and delighted.

              1. re: jen kalb
                buttertart Aug 3, 2011 11:35 AM

                That sounds great too. From Classic Italian?
                I'll post the recipe for the cabbage rolls if anyone would like it. It's one of those "when are we goinig to have x again hint hint" dishes.

                1. re: buttertart
                  jen kalb Aug 3, 2011 06:03 PM

                  its called Riso con la Verza, from More classic Italian Cooking. there is is similar recipe in the first book with just basil and moz, no cabbage.

                  1. re: jen kalb
                    buttertart Aug 4, 2011 07:42 AM

                    Must try, thanks very much. Speaking of basil and mozz with rice, did you ever try the baked eggplant risotto from "Kitchen"? Superduper.

                    1. re: buttertart
                      jen kalb Aug 4, 2011 10:39 AM

                      no - I will take a look - that sounds delicious, too.

                      1. re: jen kalb
                        buttertart Aug 4, 2011 10:48 AM

                        It's great - good for potlucks where there may be vegetarians, made with vegetable stock.

            2. chef chicklet Aug 3, 2011 07:56 AM

              Love to use it with really nice baby back or regular pork spareribs, use vinegar,, onions, brown sugar, apples, fresh garlic, seasonings of garlic powder, caraway and salt and pepper for a quick sauerkraut. Savoy cabbage makes a deliciously fresh background for pork ribs. And of course there's always kim chee!

              1. monavano Aug 3, 2011 07:33 AM

                I make galabki (Polish stuffed cabbage) with savoy. I also make a delicious braised savoy cabbage with St. Marcelin cheese from Braising with Molly.

                1. f
                  fourunder Aug 3, 2011 07:23 AM

                  Savoy Cabbage Soup......many recipes chicken broth based. I have made mine with spring vegetables in the past. Surprisingly, i recall the recipe I followed called for finishing with a pat of butter. Many Italian recipes call for the same touch.

                  3 Replies
                  1. re: fourunder
                    BananaBirkLarsen Aug 3, 2011 12:17 PM

                    My sister used to work at a restaurant and said that any time someone sent their soup back to the kitchen, the chef would send out a new bowl with an added pat of butter. Soup never got sent back twice.

                    1. re: BananaBirkLarsen
                      buttertart Aug 3, 2011 12:35 PM

                      Du beurre, du beurre, et encore du beurre...Escoffier (I think).

                      1. re: BananaBirkLarsen
                        huiray Aug 3, 2011 06:26 PM

                        I can't remember the last time I made a soup with butter added to it, or any soup for that matter using butter as the 'oil'. It generally tastes...odd...to me. OK, I think I may have used butter once with a leek & potato soup but am not sure about it.

                        I certainly would not use it in any East/SE Asian-type soup I make.

                    2. p
                      pj26 Aug 3, 2011 06:11 AM

                      I love savoy cabbage sliced up and pan fried with some butter/olive oil, pancetta, onions, garlic and a sprinkle of brown sugar to caramalise. Season and serve - we often have it with our roasts.

                      Also savoy cabbage gratin from here - a meal in itself! http://orangette.blogspot.com/2008/11...

                      1 Reply
                      1. re: pj26
                        d
                        DaisyM Aug 3, 2011 07:10 AM

                        The gratin sounds wonderful and I have leftover chicken broth. I'm going to make it tonight....thankyou!

                      2. b
                        bob96 Aug 2, 2011 09:52 PM

                        Any variation of a Portuguese-Spanish bean and cabbage dish--try chick peas/garbanzos, cooked with olive oil, garlic, smoked or regular paprika, some tomato, dried hot pepper, bay leaf, a little parsley. When done, add shredded savoy cabbage, some diced yukon gold potatoes, and, optionally, slices of chorizo or linguica. Serve with rustic bread,a chilled garnacha, Dao, or Rioja,, and some manchego or other similar cheese.

                        1 Reply
                        1. re: bob96
                          d
                          DaisyM Aug 3, 2011 03:43 AM

                          Wow, that sounds amazing!

                        2. l
                          lexpatti Aug 2, 2011 08:19 PM

                          one of my fav,, cabbage dishes is a mix of white + red cabbage (shredded or just slice) w/ bite size broccoli, cauliflour, sliced carrots. Saute this mix in a lil oil + braggs liquid amino (healthy soy). Put this over brown rice, top w/ shredded sharp cheddar and sprikle Spike seasoning.

                          1. l
                            LaureltQ Aug 2, 2011 07:30 PM

                            I cut the quantity of rice noodles in half when making pad that, in and saute a whole head of the cabbage that's been sliced to cut the calories.

                            1. w
                              wattacetti Aug 2, 2011 06:33 PM

                              I used the blanched leaves to wrap seared foie gras and diver scallop. Great stuff. You finish the packets in the over with little pats of butter and a bit of good balsamic vinegar.

                              1. s
                                sueatmo Aug 2, 2011 06:10 PM

                                All of these recipes sound good. I keep it simple with Savoy cabbage. I kitchen slice it and micro cook it with a small amount of chicken broth and caraway seed. I finish with small pat of butter, if I have it.

                                1. JungMann Aug 2, 2011 05:04 PM

                                  Shred one head of Savoy cabbage. Toss with macaroni, shredded chicken, shredded cheddar, minced onions, diced apples, mayo, sugar, vinegar and a dash of Sriracha.

                                  1. c
                                    carbonaraboy Aug 2, 2011 04:12 PM

                                    Pizzoccheri! Savoy cabbage is the green that usually used. This works great with store bought whole wheat past too. You can also add some cured pork, like speck or American country ham.

                                    http://www.italianfoodforever.com/iff...

                                    1 Reply
                                    1. re: carbonaraboy
                                      p
                                      piccola Aug 7, 2011 06:29 PM

                                      Pizzoccheri are delicious but definitely not summer food.

                                    2. CindyJ Aug 2, 2011 02:20 PM

                                      How about a yummy Tuscan ribollita? http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/in...

                                      2 Replies
                                      1. re: CindyJ
                                        t
                                        teezeetoo Aug 2, 2011 02:44 PM

                                        1 head savoy cabbage (about 1 1/2 lbs) or 1 head Chinese cabbage, cored, shredded across in approx 3/4-inch slices (about 1 1/2 lbs)
                                        2 tablespoons peanut oill
                                        1 tablespoon minced garlic
                                        salt & pepper
                                        1 1/4 tablespoons ginger, minced
                                        1 lime, juice of
                                        stir fry everything but the lime juice in a hot wok for about 2 minutes. add lime juice and serve.

                                        1. re: teezeetoo
                                          d
                                          DaisyM Aug 2, 2011 02:58 PM

                                          Sounds really good, thank you!

                                      2. e
                                        escondido123 Aug 2, 2011 02:18 PM

                                        How about sliced and sauteed with garlic, olive oil, salt and pepper. Let it steam a bit and serve on Italian toast with more olive oil.

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