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August 2011 COTM, World Vegetarian: Sauces and Added Flavorings.

bayoucook Aug 1, 2011 06:56 AM

For topical discussion.

  1. greedygirl Aug 20, 2011 01:20 PM

    Just wondering if anyone's ever made any of the lemon chutneys. I fancy giving one of them a go next week but there are quite a few options and I'd appreciate some pointers.

    1 Reply
    1. re: greedygirl
      q
      qianning Aug 25, 2011 10:47 AM

      funny, i just pulled up this thread to see if anyone had tried to make a chutney or pickle yet....usually i'm just lazy and use the jarred kind, but there's a voice in my head saying to give it a try....we'll see...

    2. L.Nightshade Aug 10, 2011 04:34 PM

      Mango Chutney with Fennel and Fenugreek (Aam Ki Lonji), page 696.

      This recipe calls for green mangos, not the green-soon-to-be-ripe mangos found at the grocers, but hard, green, premature, sour mangos that are not sold around here. I used ordinary mangos, unripe, green and firm, just because I wanted a mango chutney and the ingredients in this one looked good.

      This recipe starts with the basic mango chutney on page 695, which contains mangos, salt, garlic, ginger, cider vinegar, sugar, golden raisins, turmeric, and cayenne. This version adds fennel seeds, brown mustard seeds, cumin seeds, nigella, and fenugreek, all briefly cooked in peanut oil before inclusion in the basic recipe.

      Considering I knowingly used the wrong kind of mango, this came out very well. I'm sure it is different than the authentic version, but it did its job well as an additional accompaniment to the sandwiches.

      Both the chutneys I made are visible in this photo:
      http://www.chow.com/photos/657501

      2 Replies
      1. re: L.Nightshade
        greedygirl Aug 11, 2011 01:36 AM

        Wow your dinner looks fab - and a lot of work!

        1. re: greedygirl
          L.Nightshade Aug 20, 2011 02:13 PM

          Thanks greedygirl! It was a bit of work, but the taste combinations made the labor worthwhile.

      2. L.Nightshade Aug 10, 2011 04:34 PM

        Delhi-Style Cilantro and Mint Chutney, (Hari Chutney) India, page 660

        Super easy and tasty. Cilantro and mint are tossed into the blender (food processor in my case) with hot green chiles, asafetida, lime juice, water, and salt. I only added a tiny bit of water as I wanted to use this to spread on naan sandwiches. The fresh, bright flavors in this chutney worked very nicely with tandoori style chicken on naan bread.

        1. g
          Goblin Aug 1, 2011 02:26 PM

          Circassian Sauce--A Walnut and Bread Sauce (p. 684)

          Completely new to me, this Turkish walnut sauce really added a suave flavor to the Green Bean Salad on p. 202. The next day, I scarfed up the extra sauce with torn-off hunks of pita bread !

          Anyway, the prep is very easy. Just toss the following into a food processor or blender: 1 cup of coarsely chopped walnuts, 2 "thinnish" slices of bread broken into small pieces (I just followed the recommended measurement to make 1 cup of Pepperidge Farm Hearty White Bread), 3/4 cup of milk, 1 TBS of EVOO olive oil or walnut oil (I used olive oil) plus a scant 1/2 tsp of salt and freshly ground black pepper. Blend into a smooth sauce the consistency of crepe batter, adding a bit more milk if you want (I didn't.) You end up with 1 1/2 cups of a surprisingly savory, ever-so-slightly sweet but also mildly piquant sauce to add to your Green Been Salad, and I'm sure it would be good with other vegetable dishes like roasted/boiled broccoli, carrots, eggplants, etc.

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