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What are these eggs?

m
montrealeater Jul 4, 2011 11:38 AM

I have a weakness for a certain type of scrambled eggs, and that is the type I have most often had at cheap roadside diners on roadtrips and also on ferries at breakfast time. They are completely uniform in colour - a pale yellow, and there is no discerable whites vs yolks. Are these powdered eggs? If so, are they prepared by adding water to the powder and cooking them up? Are powdered eggs available for retail sale? I freakin LOVE them (if that's what they are)...

If they're not powdered, what are they? I gotta have these at home!

  1. ipsedixit Jul 4, 2011 11:57 AM

    Either powder or liquid eggs. Most likely liquid, watered down a bit and added with some butter.

    You can find them in the dairy aisle in milk cartons along with "regular" eggs.

    1. w
      wattacetti Jul 4, 2011 11:58 AM

      Really? This is what turns your crank? Anyway, they could be powdered eggs or those liquid eggs in a carton. In volume, real eggs are cheaper, so it may just be a way they're blending. if you find a diner you like that serves these things, why not ask?

      2 Replies
      1. re: wattacetti
        m
        montrealeater Jul 4, 2011 12:08 PM

        Yes, wattacetti, I LOVE these weird monochrome eggs. I havent had them for a long time (hence the question) - have never seen them here in Montreal, and am actively disappointed when I go out for breakfast and *don't* get them here (which is...every time I go out for breakfast, ha). I will try to the liquid eggs from the store - haven't seen these before, but then again, I haven't looked. If the liquid eggs aren't it, I'll seek out some powdered eggs.

        I am hoping that diners along the Transcanada still serve them, because I'm pretty sure BC Ferries has stopped and I will be bereft without my pale, floppy eggs. Don't get me wrong, I love eggs in all forms and make myself scrambled eggs at least once a week, but I have a specific craving for the diner style ones right now...

        1. re: montrealeater
          w
          wattacetti Jul 4, 2011 12:37 PM

          The BC Ferries eggs - I now know what you're talking about. Those are commercial pre-processed things and the last time I encountered those was at the "free breakfast" at the Holiday Inn (Kelowna to be specific).

          I'm not sure if you're going to get the same texture/taste from either powdered or liquid, but you can always try.

          Now you've got me wanting to make a square monochrome egg to serve with pork belly.

      2. c
        CanadaGirl Jul 4, 2011 12:19 PM

        I was making scrambled eggs a little while ago, and all of my whisks were missing (I have sons, they play with things they shouldn't ...) so I used my immersion blender to beat the eggs. The result was perfectly uniform eggs. They were also a bit different in texture somehow.

        1 Reply
        1. re: CanadaGirl
          Veggo Jul 4, 2011 12:25 PM

          Yes, you fluffed them up with air. So good with Canadian cheddar cheesy eggs!

        2. paulj Jul 4, 2011 06:40 PM

          Mixing the eggs with a blender, and then scrambling them on a griddle, turning only a few time, should give something close.

          1. pikawicca Jul 4, 2011 06:56 PM

            I whisk my free-range eggs with a bit of cream and salt and pepper, then cook on low heat in a little butter. They are a uniform color, creamy and soft. I don't understand why posters are suggesting that this color can only be achieved by fake eggs.

            7 Replies
            1. re: pikawicca
              m
              montrealeater Jul 4, 2011 07:05 PM

              I am specifically looking for the commercial egg product, not just normal eggs prepared to look a certain way (my fault, I should have been clearer) - I was just trying to figure out a)what it is (powder, liquid etc.) and b)where I can get it.

              Thanks for all the tips, I gotta have my fakey yummy eggs.

              1. re: montrealeater
                pikawicca Jul 4, 2011 07:08 PM

                Sorry, I don't understand why you are sure that your yummy eggs are "fake."

                1. re: pikawicca
                  m
                  montrealeater Jul 4, 2011 07:13 PM

                  I'm not 100% sure. I'm mostly sure because the only places I've ever had these eggs is in low end diners, institutions (a friend says they were fed these eggs in the military all the time), BC ferries etc. And I have never seen eggs like this in someone's home, a high end resto etc. I could be wrong, definitely, in fact I hope I am because then it means I can make these at home without buying some strange egg products I may have difficulty finding.

                  Does anyone else reading this thread have a clear idea of the eggs I mean? Maybe others could describe them better...

                  1. re: montrealeater
                    s
                    S_K Jul 4, 2011 08:36 PM

                    If it's like low end diner/school cafeteria stuff, then it's very likely liquid eggs, they beat them and sell them in a carton. An example is Egg Creations which has only egg whites: http://www.burnbraefarms.com/consumer...

                    If you click through that site, you will also find other egg products such as the "break free" eggs which are more like regular eggs only they are pre-whipped and have a bit of fat removed.

                    As someone mentioned before, these products will be near the eggs in the supermarket, but you may not have noticed them before since eggs are near milk and juice and all of those cartons sometimes blend into a faceless mass of cartons. Some of these liquid eggs will come in different flavours.

                    1. re: S_K
                      paulj Jul 4, 2011 08:40 PM

                      Many of the eggs in cartons are just whites, or whites with a bit of fat and coloring added. Whole liquid eggs are not as common at the retail level.

                      1. re: paulj
                        s
                        S_K Jul 4, 2011 08:52 PM

                        OH! Okay. So maybe a blender is the best bet then.

                      2. re: S_K
                        w
                        wattacetti Jul 4, 2011 08:54 PM

                        The BC Ferries eggs that montrealeater refers to was an individually portioned "omelette" as was the variant I discovered at the Holiday Inn in the OK.

                        They were sort-of like this product (not as fancy):

                        http://www.pacefarm.com/LinkClick.asp...

              2. m
                montrealeater Jul 7, 2011 06:34 PM

                Look what I found: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/613710

                I am not the only one!
                *is validated*

                I am going to buy some liquid and some whole powdered eggs and see what happens. In that thread someone comments that having a large, flat grill is probably part of it and this sounds right. I don't have one. :(

                1. n
                  nikki444 Jul 8, 2011 04:59 AM

                  I KNOW what you're talking about! While staying w/daughter in hospital for a month, I ate those same eggs in the hospital cafeteria and have craved (probably a comfort thing) them ever since. Tried the all egg white liquid stuff in the grocery store, but not even close. I might follow through with some purchasing info offered here. (I too love regular eggs, and get farm eggs here where I live. I know! I'd just like to have these "institutional eggs" once in awhile, too! Thanks for the thread!

                  1. k
                    ksmith51432 Jul 9, 2011 07:33 AM

                    think they are powdered, reconstituted w/ water; I have a 20 oz can of 'Eggs, Scrambled with ham, peppers & cheese Western-Style Cooked, freeze-dehydrated -

                    directions are to mix with 3 1/2 quarats hot (180-200f ) hater to contents of can; mix, wait 10 minutes, drain excess water; makes 20 1/2 cup servings

                    affectionaltely known as 'C-Rats' and many products, including just plain freeze-dried scrambled eggs can be found at Military Surplus stores or in military community 'yard sales';

                    I also have a 20 oz can EGG MIX, Dehydrated; specifically says to DO NOT USE MILK; mix with 1 1/2 quarts lukewarm water, put eggs in bowl add 1/3 water and whip until a smooth paste is formed, add remaining water and whip until blended; NOTE: mixture will be thick; do not add additional water.
                    pour about 1 qt of egg mixture on a lightly greased griddle, preheated to 325F; cook slowly to desired firmness, stiring occarionally; Eggs do not become more firm after removing from heat.
                    serve at once, makes about 30 1/3 cup servings.

                    There are also directions for French toast and salad dressings.
                    packed for A.j. Foods, Inc, Minneapolia MN 65421-2953

                    We keep a fair supply of C-rats or MRE's in our evacuation boxes;

                    I'm sure you are referring to a prepackaged egg product where the albumin ( white ) has been totally incorporated into the fat of the yolk;

                    Good luck in your search - you might be able to still find powered eggs on some of the 'emergency food' supply sites -
                    KinNC

                    3 Replies
                    1. re: ksmith51432
                      m
                      montrealeater Jul 9, 2011 08:24 PM

                      Thanks KSmith1432, I am going to get some powdered eggs the way you specifcy (whites totally incorporated into yolks, or vice versa). I'll report back in this thread. Anyone who has tried liquid eggs (apparently not the kind sold in smaller, household-size serving at the grocery store) please also report back!

                      Nikki444 - It's funny, my parents get fresh eggs from a neighbour with free roaming chickens and they are my favourite eggs ever. Second place is these institutional eggs. Huh.

                      1. re: montrealeater
                        paulj Jul 9, 2011 09:16 PM

                        You could try a Northern supply outfit or a backpacking store, for example MEC
                        http://www.mec.ca/Products/product_de...

                        1. re: montrealeater
                          n
                          nikki444 Jul 10, 2011 05:04 AM

                          Griin!

                      2. k
                        kcward Jul 9, 2011 06:37 PM

                        High volume egg places (100+ scrambles or omelets) don't crack the eggs to order, they crack 300+ eggs into a strainer, then whisk or blend (as another poster suggested). A 4oz ladle is a 3 egg omelet. So, it's not necessarily powdered/liquid eggs that you're craving.

                        1. LorenM Jul 9, 2011 08:27 PM

                          I've cooked in a couple places some years back that did some pretty big breakfast services and. no I have never seen a restaurant use powdered eggs (only Egg Beaters on request), used real eggs and didn't just crack them into a big strainer either.. exactly. We used whole eggs and cracked them by hand (one in each) into big 5 gallon mayo buckets. You get really fast at it pretty quickly. There was a strainer in which the egg would go through to catch any small bits but we didn't just throw whole eggs in there or anything.

                          I worked at one place that added a little water to the eggs and one place that didn't. I did find the slightly watered eggs to be a bit lighter and more forgiving to overcooking (which is easy if you are also doing 10 other things). Most important is the big, flat surface of a flat-top where the eggs basically expand until they reach terminal viscosity and, bang, fold, flip, chop, fold, flip, chop and you have perfect diner scrambled eggs.

                          1. n
                            ninrn Jul 9, 2011 08:42 PM

                            I agree that what you like is probably not pre-processed, just mass processed at the restaurant. The premixed stuff is just too expensive. But if you want to try, Eggland's Best makes what they call Whole Liquid Egg Product:

                            http://www.egglandsbest.com/Libraries...

                            Although I don't think they make it available to individuals, they'll probably have a list of restaurants, cafeterias and caterers in your area who purchase it. Maybe you can contact some of them and see if anyone will order a case for you.

                            1. c
                              calliope_nh Jul 9, 2011 09:37 PM

                              Many of the liquid egg products are pasteurized and some restaurants use them for ceaser salads in addition to scrambled eggs.

                              1. j
                                Javin Mar 11, 2014 05:20 AM

                                As one who used to work at a few of those "dive" places, I can assure you that most will not be using the powdered/liquid eggs. The powdered/liquids stuff just isn't cost effective. It only makes sense to use when you're going through a very, very large volume of eggs and the cost of storing them in cold storage becomes prohibitive.

                                Instead, what we would do was (as others have said) is crack a bunch of eggs into a 5 gallon bucket (from Home Depot, no less... Not sure about today with people's BPA scares). You'd just hang a sieve into the bucket, and crack through several dozen eggs, dropping them into the sieve. The sieve would break the yolks and catch any shell bits you drop.

                                Then add two to three cups of lukewarm water to "loosen" the eggs, and whip the everlovin' crap out of them until you get a single smooth consistency. Then the bucket o' eggs gets poured into pitchers, and those pitchers are refrigerated. End morning egg prep.

                                This same mixture was then used to make eggs for sandwiches, scrambled eggs, and omelets during the morning rush.

                                We would get our eggs at a discount, about $2 per dozen, so the entire tub of about 7 dozen eggs was $14. We'd make that back on 5 sandwiches alone.

                                Trying to get the same turnaround on powdered, dehydrated, or pre-prepped liquid eggs just isn't feasible until you start cranking out eggs on the scale of McDonald's, and have to really REALLY save on your storage costs (eg: keeping them in non-temperature controlled storage).

                                Finally, there's the grill you prep it on, which I think makes all the difference in the world. We would use a form of clarified butter (called Ghee) on the grill. It doesn't scorch like regular butter (has a 485F smoke point vs. the 250F smoke point of butter). You put it on a grill hot enough to cause water to bead up, then you throw the eggs on it. The "boiling" of the water added to the eggs adds to the "fluffiness" I suppose. (Never did it without water). Then scrambling is just a matter of tossing/cutting with a couple steel spatulas.

                                The closest I've been able to emulate that grill at home is with one of those double-burner cast iron griddle covers. Still cooks pretty unevenly (on a glass top stove) but it's passable.

                                3 Replies
                                1. re: Javin
                                  John E. Mar 11, 2014 07:26 AM

                                  How long ago and where were the eggs costing $2/dozen? I can buy large eggs at retail for $1.50 a dozen and even for less at Costco. I also find them on sale frequently for .99¢ a dozen.

                                  1. re: John E.
                                    r
                                    Raffles Mar 11, 2014 08:00 AM

                                    We get farm fresh brown eggs for $1.40 a dozen from a neighbors farm. They get cheaper when they replace the hens with pullets with smaller eggs.

                                  2. re: Javin
                                    a
                                    Alan408 Mar 11, 2014 07:38 AM

                                    Welcome to Chowhound, thanks for sharing

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