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Seattle First Timer - Trip Itinerary Help Please!

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Hello all!

I'm a NY Area Chowhounder heading to Seattle for the first time with my girlfriend. I've been reading the Seattle board, the Frank Bruni piece, and some random internet sites, and have come up with a possible itinerary. Any comments/suggestions are welcome! Everything is up for reconsideration, though perhaps my last meal is not:

Thursday - Arrive at 11am
Lunch near Pike's Place (Matt's, Etta's ,something else?) - of course I would be willing to travel elsewhere for lunch. Preferably though, I'd want it to be next to something touristy because this will be my introduction to the city.
Dinner - Joule

Friday -
Brunch at Cafe Champagne
Daytrip - Hiking on Mt. Ranier? Snoqualmie Falls? Any advice on the best hiking or sights for a daytrip would also be appreciated
Dinner - Poppy at 8:15 (Looks amazing!)
After Dinner drinks - Tavern's Law (it's nearby right?)

Saturday -
Brunch - Madison Park Conservatory (is there anything to see or do out this way? It seems a bit far out. Any other recommendations for brunch or lunch near a good area to explore/sight to see would work too!)
Dinner - Book Bindery

Sunday -
I plan on stopping at Salumi at 11 when they open, grabbing sandwiches, then heading up to Lummi Island for dinner at Willows Inn for 5pm cocktails. Am I leaving myself enough time? I'm VERY excited for this meal.

Monday - departure from Bainbridge for the airport.

Questions - Are Book Bindery, Joule, and Poppy a good cross-section and cream of the crop of the Seattle dining scene? Where can I go for killer oysters? I seem to be lacking in this department. As you can see, my preference is for more creative cuisine, with a de-emphasis on Italian because it is so abundant back home. Also - my preference is for a restaurant that is in an easily accessible OR happening area, where I could walk around and grab a cocktail after would be preferred, as I don't have a car and will be taking taxis. But of course! If something is in the boondocks and is worth it, I'll make the sacrafice!

Other restaurant's I'd been looking at are: Staple and Fancy (based on the reviews only, the menu didn't grab me. Perhaps the "Fancy" Menu is worth the while?); Monsoon (for lunch); Mistral Kitchen (looks excellent); and Spruce and Sitka. While Rovers and Crush certainly looked great, I think I'll give my wallet a break and make Willows my only blow-out meal.

Thanks in advance for the advice. I'm very much looking forward to this trip!

-----
Salumi
309 3rd Ave S, Seattle, WA 98104

Mistral Kitchen
2020 Westlake Avenue, Seattle, WA 98121

Book Bindery
198 Nickerson Street, Seattle, WA 98109

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  1. A couple of problems I can see right off...

    Hiking on Mount Rainier after having brunch anywhere in town is probably not going to work so well, unless you're okay with a very short hike. You'd want to leave town early to get in a decent hike on the mountain. Just driving the whole loop around the mountain takes a good long day, without a stop for a hike. If you can't stay a night up there, I'd recommend a more close-in destination for a day hike (but as for where...I'll have to leave that for my less couch potato-inclined Chowhound colleagues to suggest!)

    And sorry to break the news, but Salumi isn't open Sundays--they're Tuesday - Friday only!

    The rest sounds lovely (and enough out of my budget that I can't really give you any useful input). Have fun!

    -----
    Salumi
    309 3rd Ave S, Seattle, WA 98104

    1 Reply
    1. re: MsMaryMc

      MsMaryMc is correct. You will need to leave early for a decent one day experience at Mt Rainier. and if you don't think you'll be out here again in the near future, I recommend that you do that instead of having brunch at Cafe Campagne, even though it is a good place for brunch. You can have brunch anytime, but The Mountain is amazing and if you're not going to be out here again any time soon, I'd do it. Unless the weather is bad. In that event, I recommend getting an umbrella, taking a ferry over to Bainbridge Island, and strolling around the little town there (Winslow). Cafe Nola is good for brunch (not so much for dinner, however). There are also two excellent bakeries--Blackbird and Bainbridge Bakers. Good places for dinner include Four Swallows and Hitchcock. I recommend the first more due to better service. They're all within easy walking distance of the ferry terminal. Or if you have a car, it's an easy drive off the Island to the Agate Pass Cafe in Suquamish, where there's a beautiful view of Seattle.

      -----
      Cafe Campagne
      1600 Post Alley, Seattle, WA 98101

      Cafe Nola
      101 Winslow Way E, Bainbridge Island, WA 98110

      Four Swallows
      481 Madison Ave N, Bainbridge Island, WA 98110

      Agate Pass Cafe
      7220 NE Park Way, Suquamish, WA 98392

    2. Here is my humble opinion:

      I'd pick Lecosho over Matt's or Etta's for lunch near Pike Place Market. "Matt" actually left Matt's to open Lecosho.

      I will probably get plenty of disagreement on this, but I was pretty disappointed at Book Bindery. My pork chop was seriously overcooked, and my appetizer had little flavor. The five others I went with had a mixed experience, with some dishes being good but not great, and others just okay.

      I love Joule and have been there many times. There's also Revel (same chef-owners) in Fremont, a different neighborhood that also has plenty going on.

      I may be in the minority on this one also, but I'm not a big Monsoon fan. Nothing I had there was bad; I've just had better food at other restaurants.

      I'd try to fit in Sitka & Spruce, which is open for lunch and dinner. They do interesting things with local ingredients, and I've had some incredible dishes there. Also, there are more interesting things to see in this area (Capitol Hill) than in Madison Park, IMHO. You can also have a drink at Bar Ferd'nand, in the same building (the Melrose Market) as Sitka & Spruce.

      Enjoy!

      4 Replies
      1. re: Thiebaud

        Thiebaud, Revel looks excellent, and venturing into Fremont, which would be yet another area to see, would be a bonus. This is causing me to second-guess my choice of Joule for a dinner.

        Sitka and Spruce's menu, however, doesn't quite do it for me. Are they known to have many specials on most days? Maybe when July comes, they will change some options, as I see they'r online menu is dated June 2. While I have no doubt the food and service is great, after perusing the menu choices, I don't know what I'd even get.

        1. re: Rich D.

          Don't second-guess yourself here. Although Revel maybe provides a more unique (read: trendy?) dining experience, Joule is the better restaurant.

          1. re: Mike CP

            I agree that if I had to pick one, I'd pick Joule over Revel. But Revel is also open for lunch, so you might be able to do both! I personally don't think of it as trendy.

            Sitka & Spruce does not have many specials. The food is great, the service can be uneven. It's probably worth checking for an updated menu. Another option in Capitol Hill is Skillet Diner, open for only about a month. More low-end than the other places you've mentioned, but I just went there and it was delicious (had the fried-chicken sandwich, with a fennel-jalapeno crust on a potato roll from Macrina Bakery). They're open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. No reservations and very popular, so you'd probably have to wait unless you went at an off time. Skillet is a popular food truck (you can check their website or twitter updates to see where they are for lunch that day), and they just opened the diner, as well. (Not to overwhelm you with options, but I do think that to really experience Seattle, you want get out of downtown and see the neighborhoods.)

            Also, if you do get to Salumi, a little-known fact is that you can call in your order ahead of time, then bypass the long line and go straight to the counter to pick up your lunch. (I'm assuming that you'll take it to go.) If anyone gives you a look, just say "phone order."

            1. re: Thiebaud

              A noonish trip in Fremont calls for a stop at the Baguette Box. We, meat-eaters, love the fried Tofu sandwich most of all there.

              -----
              Baguette Box
              1203 Pine St, Seattle, WA 98101

      2. Rich, You have done your homework well. As Ms. Mary said, you can't really do a Mt. Rainier day trip and fit in your other schedule. You can do a day trip to Snoqualmie Falls and the restaurant there is quite good. (You will need to rent a car.) For oysters, I recommend the Walrus & The Carpenter. For Saturday lunch, I recommend the upstairs bar at Maximillen's at the Market. The mussels are terrific. My experience at the Book Bindery was excellent but you need reservations well in advance. I suggest breakfast at LOLA and late drinks at the Palace Kitchen.

        -----
        Palace Kitchen
        2030 5th Ave, Seattle, WA 98121

        Book Bindery
        198 Nickerson Street, Seattle, WA 98109

        1. Thanks for the comments thus far all! This is the exact kind of advice that only Chowhound can provide. I will re-think the Mt. Ranier trip, as you have all wisely cautioned me about the timing of it. Perhaps Snoqaulmie Falls is more appropriate given the time constraints.

          As for Book Bindery, I actually do have reservations already, thankfully. For all of the places I mentioned I was fortunate enough to secure reservations. I will certainly need to re-think lunch/breakfast on Sunday before my drive north to Lummi, being that Salumi is closed on that day. Perhaps Lola!

          1 Reply
          1. re: Rich D.

            Seattle Met magazine just listed 20 trails within 1 hour of downtown: http://www.seattlemet.com/travel-and-....
            A couple are on Bainbridge. Be sure to report back - you've got a delicious trip planned!

          2. You've clearly done your homework and have gotten some great advice here. I'd consider Staple & Fancy - I was pretty wowed there. I am also not a huge fan of Monsoon. Do your best to get to Salumi on Thursday - you can buy some finocchionia or salami to take with you for a picnic on Friday. As you're already heard, you can't really do Mt. Rainier in an afternoon. The only option would be to skip brunch and leave town early and drive down to Paridise in Mt Rainier NP - this is about 2.5 hrs from Seattle, well worth the trouble (and some things are more important than food). It is spectacular down there. There is still ons of snow, though, so no easy hiking yet, although you can stop along the road on the way in for any number of lower elevation hikes. Another alternative would be to do brunch, skip the day trip, and spend the afternoon in one of Seattle's spectacular city parks. My favorites are Seward Park (a lovely drive down Lake Washington Blvd from Madison Park) and Discovery Park on the west side of town. Or the UW Washington Park Arboreteum. You can easily get in several miles of walking in these big parks.

            1. Late to the answers - just a couple of notes:
              Poppy and Tavern Law are walking distance, but it is about 18 blocks - maybe a 20 minute walk, longer if you window shop or gawk.
              Hit Salumi on Thursday - sounds like you are staying near the Market? It will get you a quick orientation to downtown - you can hop on a bus in the free ride zone and head south, then walk off your lunch as you head North to the Market, or along the waterfront (terribly touristy) and back up the Hillclimb to the Market. You can also go through Pioneer Square and see the old lowrise structures and preservation. The area tends to feel a little abandoned, but there are some gems tucked in around there. For something very touristy, you could take the Underground tour.
              Weekday lunch at Cafe Campagne doesn't start until 11 a.m. That really means a late start for hiking. Worth checking to see if there are enough breakfast items to start your day.
              On Sunday, it takes about 2 hours to drive to the very short ferry to Lummi Island and minutes to the Willows Inn. You could spend some time along the way in Skagit Valley. There is a really nice bird sanctuary at Padilla Bay, complete with an interpretative center and trails. And a visit to nearby Edison is always fun for a lunch stop.

              -----
              Cafe Campagne
              1600 Post Alley, Seattle, WA 98101

              Salumi
              309 3rd Ave S, Seattle, WA 98104

              1. Staple and Fancy is one of my favorites right now--I have only ever eaten fancy. I prefer it to Book Bindery. Plus, it's in a much better area for walking around and grabbing a drink after. It does have a more mediterranean/Italian influence though.

                For your daytrip, or one day, you have to go to the Locks in Ballard. It is my number one place to take people from out of town. I agree with everyone else that you can't fit Mt. Rainier in between brunch and dinner. You could try the Arboretum or Discovery Park, which are both in town but very large.

                -----
                Book Bindery
                198 Nickerson Street, Seattle, WA 98109

                2 Replies
                1. re: cocktailhour

                  Cocktail hour gives real advice, if just scratching the surface. In-town offers plenty of hoofing, if that's your thing (Arboretum, Discovery Park, Schmitz). For the view, Kerry Park, for sure, but also Volunteer park overlook and how could I forget climbing the water tower. From top of the tank, you'll see everything. Out of Town, even Snoqualmie seems more ambitious than prudent, with short time, though surely scenic and memorable. The Locks alone are worth an afternoon for the boats, the fish, the machinery, the people, the amazing plant collection.
                  Have fun, and do report...

                  1. re: mrnelso

                    Seward Park if you're looking for serious Northwest flavor- old growth forest- and a about 10 minutes from Tamarind Tree.

                    If you're out by MPC, you could park by the Museum of Industry and Technology and take the Foster Island Trail into the Arboretum. Wetlands into beautiful green, and a Japanese Garden if you care to walk far enough

                    -----
                    Tamarind Tree
                    1036 S Jackson St, Seattle, WA 98104

                2. Thank you all so much - the last few days have been a whirlwind trying to tie up loose ends at work before the trip. I have some last minute questions. Basically I'm lacking on lunches. I just read that Salumi is taking a week-long vacation and will be closed the days I am out there. Just my luck!

                  For now, here is what I'm working with:

                  Thursday

                  11am Drop off Bags

                  Early Lunch at Pike Place:
                  Options - (1) BBQ Pork Bun at Mee Sum Pastry; (2) Fish Sandwich – Market Grill at the Market; or (3) ??? Are there any other must tries at or near the market??

                  Head to Space Needle? Then Elliot’s – Oysters at 3pm? (is this near the Space Needle?)

                  Check in to Hotel - relax change for evening

                  Ballard Locks (600pm? - Is 2 hours enough time to check out the locks and walk to S&F?)

                  Dinner at Staple and Fancy 8pm

                  Pre or Post dinner Drinks – Bastille or La Isla

                  Friday - Don't know if I will do breakfast or lunch - depends on timing and how intense my hike/walk will be:

                  Breakfasts Ideas : Skillet Diner (Capitol Hill) OR Lola (Belltown)
                  Lunch Ideas - Madison Park Conservatory

                  Hike Walk Ideas(Anyone have any suggestions as to what's best? We will have a car this day and the last day):

                  Arboreteumm? – if so, lunch at Madison Park Conservator
                  Seward Park- If so, Tamarind Tree for lunch
                  Discovery Park - Where to eat lunch near here?
                  Alki Beach - Where to eat lunch near here?
                  Underground Walking Tour-Pioneer Square?
                  Ballard Locks - if not night before - If so, eat at Paseo

                  Dinner - Poppy (Capitol Hill)
                  Drinks – Tavern’s Law or Knee High Stocking Co.

                  Saturday

                  Olympic Sculpture Park for pre-lunch walk

                  Lunch - NO IDEA! Based on my itinerary, what is a must explore area/nearby restaurant?

                  Afternoon - Do any leftover things not yet done, e.g. - Underground Walking Tour OR Ballard Locks (Paseo or Walrus and Carpenter for oysters)

                  Dinner - Book Bindery or Mistral Kitchen or Joule??
                  I'm leaning against Joule because of my Sunday lunch options... Which one should I go with??

                  Cocktails – ZigZag at the Market

                  Sunday

                  Brunch - Nettletown OR Monsoon (both look delicious and very contrasting to my dinner. Both on the way from Downtown to I-5 on way out of the City (sort of).

                  Hit the road after brunch at 1'oclock-ish for my drive to Bellingham

                  Willows Inn on Lummi – cocktail hour starts at 5pm

                  Monday - breakfast at hotel in Bellingham - Drive Home

                  Any thoughts on whether I'm missing any great sights or neighborhoods or types of cuisine are very, very welcomed.

                  4 Replies
                  1. re: Rich D.

                    Wow, I'm a little overwhelmed by your ability to be so organized!

                    For lunch near Olympic Sculpture Park, I'd pick Lecosho. The porchetta is their signature dish, although I got something else (pork chop - delicious) when I went.

                    Re Nettletown: I have heard (but haven't been there myself) that the elk meatball sandwich is fantastic but that the noodle dishes are somewhat lacking.

                    Since you're already seeing Ballard and Capitol Hill, I'd try to add Fremont as a neighborhood to see if you have time. There are several restaurants there - I guess it's no secret that my favorite is Revel. And FWIW, my favorite dish there is the short-rib dumplings.

                    Re walk ideas: Since your coming from NYC, I'd suggest the Arboretum or Discovery Park (which have the kind of natural beauty right in the city that you don't get in NYC). Seward Park and Alki Beach are beautiful also but don't have nearby eateries that are as good as the other neighborhoods IMHO. Tamarind Tree is not close to Seward Park, although you could hit it on the way down to Seward Park. Personally, I'd skip the underground tour since you have limited time. It's kind of corny (but worth doing if you have a lot of time or have just moved here). Or pick the Ballard Locks!

                    1. re: Thiebaud

                      Thiebaud - Thanks for the compliment! (I think that's what that was at least! haha)

                      Awesome advice, and duly noted. Thank you. For everyone else willing to be so helpful, I'm leaving tomorrow! I am very, very excited to see the city.

                      Thanks again all!

                    2. re: Rich D.

                      2 hours is not even close to enough - slow down.
                      You have a grand and delightful plan, to enjoy the locks, the machinery, the salmon, the gulls, the levitating boats... and end the day with an evening at Staple & Fancy.
                      Start early, stay late. You will love it forever,

                      1. re: mrnelso

                        Rich D. - consider going to Boat Street Cafe for brunch after the Olympic Sculpture Park. It's great, right down the street and owned by the same woman who owns Walrus and Carpenter and is mentioned (and pictured!) in the Frank Bruni article. Enjoy your visit!

                    3. wow, you are very very scheduled--I would say overscheduled, but I walk and do everything else pretty slowly.

                      here are my comments:

                      Early Lunch at Pike Place:
                      Options - (1) BBQ Pork Bun at Mee Sum Pastry; (2) Fish Sandwich – Market Grill at the Market; or (3) ??? Are there any other must tries at or near the market??

                      CMT: you can buy a bun and a sandwich to share, and then be open for a pastry or snack or something that catches your eye. In the market, it's the whole experience and sampling that's the "must-try." Check out Beecher's and the truffle shop.

                      Head to Space Needle? Then Elliot’s – Oysters at 3pm? (is this near the Space Needle?)

                      CMT: Elliot's is just a couple blocks from the Market. The Needle is a couple miles away, and in summer there is likely to be a line if you want to go up (an hour or multi hours depending on the cruise ships and the weather). If you don't want to go up, then you get good views of the Needle from all over. I don't think you can start at the Market at 11 am, wander, eat, go to the Needle, then be back again by 3 for oyster (if, like me, you want to wander at all).

                      Ballard Locks (600pm? - Is 2 hours enough time to check out the locks and walk to S&F?)

                      CMT: it's a mile or 2 from the locks to S&F. I would give myself more time at the Locks for sure. stay long enough to watch a lock fill and empty, then check out the fish ladder. if you are eating oysters at 3, then plan to "rest," again I don't see it working.

                      Pre or Post dinner Drinks – Bastille or La Isla
                      CMT: Bastille has better atmosphere. I rememver La Isla being a little too cafe=feeling.

                      Hike Walk Ideas(Anyone have any suggestions as to what's best? We will have a car this day and the last day):
                      Arboreteumm? – if so, lunch at Madison Park Conservator
                      Seward Park- If so, Tamarind Tree for lunch
                      Discovery Park - Where to eat lunch near here?
                      Alki Beach - Where to eat lunch near here?
                      Underground Walking Tour-Pioneer Square?
                      Ballard Locks - if not night before - If so, eat at Paseo
                      CMT: SKip the underground tour. Locks first choice, Discovery park for nature (you can walk to a lighthouse). there's nothing immediately close, but a few miles away is Golden Gardens, which is a park on the beach, plus the second Paseo's is right there. you can drive there in 15 minutes. Also, fyi, the Locks are on the way between Discovery Park and Golden Gardens.

                      At Alki, I would eat at the Spud's for fish n chips. Yes, it used to be better, but that's what I always want at Alki. They're not the bestest or anything, just right for the surroundings. I also really like the fish n chips at the Lockspot by the Locks, which I always try to include on a trip to the Locks. plus, if you like Deadly Catch, the attached bar is where they shoot.

                      Dinner - Book Bindery or Mistral Kitchen or Joule??
                      CMT: Mistral is my first choice and I have been to all of them.

                      1. Thanks to everyone for all of their great advice. I've been back a few days from my excellent trip out to the Pacific Northwest and just now have the time to report back on my thoughts.

                        Aside from loving the locals and their hospitality, the Pike Place Market's energy, and the views of the bay and the mountains, we ate very, very well. We sampled restaurants in and explored a great cross-section of neigborhoods: Fremont, Queen Anne, Capitol Hill, Downtown, the Waterfront, Ballard, and up north--all with great results. We ate dinners at Staple & Fancy, Poppy, and Book Bindery, with the final dinner up on Lummi Island at the WIllows Inn. All were great in their own way, but it turned out that each seemed better than the last.

                        At Staple & Fancy, the "Fancy" menu was abundant and fresh. The garbanzo beans served like edamame is something I've never seen back East. I wasn't as much of a fan of the dish of egg and anchovies dish as I had expected. Smoked fish crostini, marinated olives, and a corn bisque rounded out the seemingly never-ending first course. We were next served well- prepared housemade linguine with squid ink and cuddlefish and a tasty and simply-sauced chicken (perhaps cooked sous vide?). Dessert was unremarkable, though maybe because I was so stuffed: mint ice cream and chocolate macaroons. All in all, it was a refreshing atmosphere and meal.

                        Next was Poppy, which my girlfriend and I dined at with 2 other couples. We each started cocktails, oysters and two orders of eggplant honey fries. Assorted thalis followed. The flavors popped and the variety proved to be a great conversation piece. We all enjoyed ourself, and it was perfect for such a group., but I wouldn't necessarily want to return for a more normal, quiet night on the town. The most unique, but probably not the most memorable dinner on the trip.

                        Perhaps it was because it was most akin to the techniques I'm used to seeing in New York, but Book Bindery was my favorite dinner in Seattle. The fois appetizer was decadent and so well-composed. At the suggestion of Luciano, our jovial and sage waiter, I was wow'ed by the cavatelli and my girlfriend by her plump scallops with sweet and smoky bacon jam. The dessert, which escapes me at the moment, was also sublime. I left perfectly sated, and with a huge smile on my face. It was a home run.

                        Our last dinner was up on Lummi Island at the Willows Inn. It was more of an experience than dinner. A sort of pilgrimage. After the long drive up, check-in in Bellingham, the ferry, and my timid drive around the unfamiliar island, the Willows Inn could be any other beach cottage. But it is instead a real oasis of sights, scents, and tastes, none could possibly taste crisper or fresher. It's almost like a 5-course cleanse. The oysters, clams, salmon and spot prawns still tasted of the sea. We ate raw radishes, countless types of flowers, and the most magnificent peas I've ever had. With every dish, the dining room gasped and oohed. The chefs, who brought out many dishes, explained to us the fishing, foraging, and farming techniques behind the plates. They were eager yet almost zen-like about their mission of sustantability, freshness, and pushing the boundaries. The sun set outside of our tableside window for what seemed like two hours. It was a night I won't soon forget.

                        For lunches we dined at Pike Place more often than not. Pieroshky Pieroshky, The Crumpet Shop, Beechers, and Mee Sum were so so good. We had brunch at Lola's (loved Tom's Big Breakfast), pho and a brunch dish at Monsoon, and oysters and beers at Elliot's for happy hour. On our last day we managed to make it to Revel, where we indulged in pot stickers, pork belly pancakes, and a rice bowl dish (similar to a bibimbap). All of them were excellent.

                        Thanks to all of you, I was able to feast on a great variety of amazing local flavors and innovative dishes. I will absolutely be back.

                        -----
                        Pike Place Market
                        1501 Pike Pl, Seattle, WA 98101

                        Queen Anne Cafe
                        2121 Queen Anne Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109

                        Book Bindery
                        198 Nickerson Street, Seattle, WA 98109

                        4 Replies
                        1. re: Rich D.

                          I live here and am still jealous of your trip! Thank you for the fantastic report. Glad you had a wonderful time.

                          1. re: Rich D.

                            Than you for your thoughtful report.
                            So glad you got into the grazing spirit at the Pile Place Market,

                            1. re: Rich D.

                              WOW!! That's so epic. Thanks for posting this!

                              1. re: Rich D.

                                Great report of your trip. I also just returned from Seattle, having been born and raised there, and I always stay in The Market when visiting. I've always been blown away by Beecher's. Their tomato soup and their killer grilled cheese are outstanding. I've been a huge fan of Pieroshky Pieroshky for many decades and would never think of not eating there when visiting. I am very partial to Metropolitan Grill. Their rib eyes are beyond comparison and their raw oysters are killer. I will only eat oysters in Washington...no place else I've found is worth the bother. They're like taking a bite of Puget Sound. You've named all the right places and so glad you found them :).

                              2. You really made good ground and it sounds like you had a great trip. Willows has been one of my top US dining experiences and Revel is a regular for me. I do enjoy Staple and Fancy a lot but more often I hit Walrus and the Carpenter. I have enjoyed eating eating at Poppy once. I liked the concept and the space but not enough to do it regularly. Hey you can do a whole different slate on your next visit!

                                1. This is such a lovely thread with so very many thoughtful, helpful responses.