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In search of mild salmon

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My wife and I are discovering the joys of mild salmon, but when we realized our new delight was from China, we decided to shop elsewhere and find an alternative. Today, we tried a frozen sockeye salmon from Alaska which brought us back to a strong, fishy taste that has turned us off to a lot of fish for years.
So, I throw it out to my Chowhound experts... help us find a really mild tasting salmon! I checked past Chowhound boards and found an interesting comparison thread, re: king vs. sockeye, but it didn't have suggestions as to which is milder.
We don't care if the fish is farm raised or wild. We are avoiding products form China, as I stated. Help us find MILD!
Thanks in advance,
Florida Hound

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  1. If you're looking for salmon that doesn't taste like salmon, I can't help you. But if you want salmon that doesn't have a strong "fishy" taste, I might be able to. First, buy wild king salmon. Then, depending on how you're cooking the fish, remove the skin and scrape off the dark brown flesh -- this is where the oily fishiness resides. If you're grilling, you're probably going to want to leave the skin on while cooking. Peeling off the skin and scraping off the offending flesh after cooking works just fine. (I also discard the nasty brown section of swordfish steaks.)

    1. I think your freshest bet will be the farmed Atlantic salmon, since you're in Florida. Or maybe wild salmon from the north Atlantic, like Nova Scotia. Colder water is probably better, but I think wild salmon has a more 'salmoney' taste, richer and sweeter, not more fishy to me, but I think it may depend on whether you're thinking of the salmon taste as a fishy taste- lots of people do.

      3 Replies
      1. re: EWSflash

        I don't think that there is any commercially caught wild Atlantic salmon anymore. It's basically extinct.

        1. re: pikawicca

          Wow, that's a shame. Thanks for the info.

          1. re: pikawicca

            Not extinct.

            Wild Salmon Population, while extremely low, are still in existence.

            Commercial fishing of wild Atlantic Salmon is generally prohibited in the U.S., but not necessarily in other parts of the world.

        2. I suggest that you try American-farmed trout. It's a good product, as farmed fishes go, and it's like a mild salmon. I like to cook them whole on the grill, but there are lots of different filet and whole preparations.

          1. Hi, FH:

            Friends don't let friends eat farmed salmon. It's bad for you, bad for the wild runs, and bad for the environment in general. And it looks and tastes like what the aquaculture corporatists feed it. Blech.

            If you want to eat salmon that is mild, buy wild troll-caught fish that is fresh. In Florida markets, that will mean $$$, and unless you have friends at both airports, even then it still may not be fresh. There are left coast fishmongers who will overnight you whole salmon in coldpack for the cost of the fish +$50.

            If you can't get fresh, try to find whole fish or fillets that have been flash-frozen with a thick brine-ice coating. Frozen, brined, (whole fish--head on, guts in), properly wrapped lasts about a year in your freezer. This works fine for BBQs and large parties, less so when you're cooking for 2 and have to thaw and break down a 20-pound fish.

            Failing this, just as there are premium lines of canned tuna, there are lines of premium canned salmon.

            And if it's the Omega 3s you're after, buy the oil in enteric-coated gelcaps, and save your wallet and palate until you can get to AK/BC/WA/OR for fresh salmon.

            Aloha,
            Kaleo

            1. Try arctic char instead. It's a member of the freshwater trout family that is farmed in ponds in the subpolar regions (and thus is environmentally friendlier than farmed salmon) and it looks quite like salmon on the plate, but with a milder if richer flavor.

              http://media.knoxnews.com/kns/content...

              1. I find this very odd. I actually had sockeye salmon tonight for the first time in ages. I found it so much milder than other salmon varieties. No offense, but if sockeye has a strong fishy taste, maybe salmon isn't the way to go.

                1 Reply
                1. re: jhopp217

                  Those Chinese filets were perfect to our tastebuds, but we didn't like their point of origin. And I'm taking in all the comments, and maybe salmon won't be the way to go. We'll see. And it wouldn't be the first time that my take on the world is seen as "very odd."

                2. For mild, I'd probably just stick with locally caught mahi, and cobia and wahoo when in season for variety.

                  1 Reply
                  1. re: beachmouse

                    Good call. I lived in Florida for several months this past year and was blown away by the clean and mild taste of the local mahi mahi. It also hold up well to lots of different cooking methods.
                    JeremyEG
                    HomeCookLocavore.com

                  2. I prefer Atlantic salmon
                    didn't like the "organic"
                    rainbow trout is a good alternative
                    try not to buy anything farmed
                    salmon tastes like salmon (because it is salmon!)-maybe you want something else ?
                    not sure what you can buy locally
                    good luck in your search!

                    19 Replies
                    1. re: 001mum

                      As far as I know all "Atlantic" salmon currently sold is farmed salmon.

                      See:

                      "5.Wild Atlantic salmon are endangered, and therefore illegal to catch. So all Atlantic salmon sold in the U.S. is farm-raised."

                      http://www.edf.org/article.cfm?conten...

                      1. re: Caitlin McGrath

                        um, guess I haven't been paying attention to my fish sources.
                        i grew up with 'REAL' Atlantic salmon
                        will do some research.
                        what fish is safe to eat and is not farmed?

                        1. re: 001mum

                          I like Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch guide. You can download the chart, which has recommendations for best, good, and avoid varieties based on the health of wild fisheries and fish farming practices, and the site has very good explanations.

                          http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr...

                          1. re: Caitlin McGrath

                            Thanks! have passed this on to others.
                            a brief look indicates not all farmed fish is bad
                            in fact it seems a lot of farmed is good-i just have to do a little memory work
                            need to find a sub for my salmon choices.

                            1. re: 001mum

                              Farmed? American trout or Arctic Char are top choices, according to the sites, like Seafood Watch, that examine such issues.

                          2. re: 001mum

                            Yes, the Monteray Bay Aquarium also has an Iphone App that's easy to open while at the supermarket or restaurant. Cool design too. There are lots of sustainable fish that are safe to eat. Yum.
                            JeremyEG
                            HomeCookLocavore.com

                          3. re: Caitlin McGrath

                            Farmed Atlantic salmon is the fish kingdom's equivalent of the Red Delicious apple. Cultivated for the masses to look like attractive food, but failing to deliver anything substantial in the flavor department.
                            Except that the farmed salmon is only red because color is added to make it look that way.
                            However neither the farmed salmon _or_ the RD apple live up to deserving a "delicious" descriptor.

                            1. re: The Professor

                              More apt might be the comparison of farmed salmon with Soylent Green.

                              1. re: kaleokahu

                                Or the supermarket bagel?

                                1. re: kaleokahu

                                  Farmed salmon is people??

                                  1. re: ricepad

                                    It's actually Charleton Heston.

                                    1. re: kaleokahu

                                      Now, that's funny.

                                      1. re: kaleokahu

                                        That one just made me snarf my red wine.
                                        Ouch.
                                        LOL

                                  2. re: The Professor

                                    All salmon is pink or red because of coloring agents, whether occurring naturally in their diets in the wild or in their food supplements in farms. That alone is no indicator of quality (or lack thereof).

                                    1. re: ferret

                                      It is to me, at least in farm raised salmon, where it is added to the feed.
                                      Most folks don't seem to be bothered by it, and that's fine.

                                      Actually it's the flavor of most farm raised Atlantic salmon is the real issue for me (more accurately, the lack of flavor). The impact on the environment and the feed they are given are just extra things that seal the deal for me to just avoid it most of the time.
                                      No big deal...The industry won't fold because of me. LOL.

                                      1. re: The Professor

                                        You're really splitting hairs. People are used to the pink/red color which is a pigment that wild salmon get from eating krill. The exact same pigment is added to farmed salmon's feed (and also to the koi pellets that I feed my pond fish "to enhance color"). Regardless of how they get it, it's a coloration that all salmon acquire from external sources.

                                        1. re: ferret

                                          I don't think it's splitting hairs to suggest/opine that the natural color is also indicative of a diet and environment that produces a superior tasting fish without the environmental damage caused by farming insipid, grey salmon.

                                          1. re: ferret

                                            True, but much farmed salmon is literally eating (chicken) crap. Are you okay with that?

                                            1. re: pikawicca

                                              Most organic fertilizers today involve chicken crap, so the same is true of many organic vegetables. The particular feed of animals is not so much the issue as the environmental consequences of this particular form of aquaculture.

                                2. Halibut.

                                  5 Replies
                                  1. re: babette feasts

                                    My great friend, our colleague and scholar Alarash has a 1-meter turbotier in which he can cook a taste for all of us.......... just for the halibut.

                                    1. re: kaleokahu

                                      I'm bummed that some scholar uses the same handle as me.

                                      I am aware that farmed fish is not ideal, but I have to recommend trying farmed steelhead at Costco. I live in Baltimore, and perhaps stores elsewhere on the right (not correct) coast also have these fresh fillets available.

                                      It looks like salmon in that it has pink flesh. It tastes very mild (virtually no fishy odor when baked for 12 minutes at 400F).

                                      Now is this fish fed colorant to be pink? I don't know. Is it irresponsible to eat it based on the environmental effects? I don't know that either. Despite it's convenient availability and its taste, I'll give it up if its got colorant or if its farming is harming the environment.

                                      1. re: alarash

                                        I too like Steehead . my quick research shows that another name is Rainbow Trout.
                                        or to be more confusing salmon trout. I don't shop at Costco=too much food/too many
                                        lineups for me.
                                        or perhaps it's not a sustainable fish?
                                        does anyone know the best place in TORONTO to buy this fish? how about Diana's
                                        (Lawrence west of Birchmount)?

                                        1. re: alarash

                                          American farmed trout is consistently rated as a preferred farmed fish. I think it's "better" because they are wholly freshwater fish that can be contained more readily, and their feeding is less wasteful than with farmed salmon. But the following website suggests that "Steelhead" trout in markets is imported, and its production conditions more iffy:

                                          http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr...

                                          1. re: alarash

                                            Costco recently announced that they would only sell sustainable seafood. They have stopped selling several varieties of endangered fish including swordfish and Chilean sea bass.

                                            http://www.greenpeace.org/usa/en/news...

                                      2. Wild salmon, esp. King or Sockeye, will taste like, well, salmon -- or as you put it, "fishy"

                                        You want mild? Buy farmed salmon.

                                        18 Replies
                                        1. re: ipsedixit

                                          Hi, ipse:

                                          With respect, I disagree that wild salmon tastes fishy. IME, if it is caught in salt water, processed properly and cooked/served fresh, it smells and tastes almost entirely of the ocean (or what you're preparing it with/on).

                                          This bears repeating... Friends don't let friends eat farmed salmon. They're bad for you, the wild runs, and the environment in general.

                                          The OPs can probably find the Japanese canned "red salmon" that is 70% cod if mildness (read 'no flavor/mouthfeel') or blandness is the criterion. But I think those nice FL folks got a sockeye that sat in a dockside bin a little too long or was caught in fresh water.

                                          Aloha,
                                          Kaleo

                                          1. re: kaleokahu

                                            Kaleo,

                                            I totally agree with you.

                                            I never said what wild salmon tastes "fishy". I only used that term to describe what I assumed the OP was afflicted with when he tried the sockeye salmon.

                                            I love the taste of wild salmon.

                                            But if the OP wants "mild" than there is no fish more "mild" tasting than farmed salmon -- even though I wouldn't touch the stuff with a 10 foot pole

                                            1. re: ipsedixit

                                              Hi, ipse:

                                              The word "fishy" tripped us up. It is a pretty lousy descriptor, isn't it? Few would deprecate a cheese as "cheesy" if it was spoilt or too strong-flavored for them. I have to laugh inside whenever I hear someone complain that fish tastes fishy. It makes me want to ask: "What did you expect? You put fish in your mouth, and you already knew don't like the taste of fish? Maybe you were expecting your fish to taste like Chateaubriand?"

                                              Glad we agree, but I think the OPs will now generalize the taste of what they got with that of all wild sockeye, and now they think they need to find some other variety. Unless they're the rare folks who generally dislike all fish, this is probably a bad generalization. I doubt, if they were served a fresh Copper River sockeye, they would describe the taste as "fishy"

                                              Unfortunately, your well-meant response to them yesterday implies that all wild salmon will be the same as the piece of sockeye that disappointed (wild=salmoney=fishy). But if it was a freshness or processing issue, even aquaculture fish will taste fishy if it's not well taken care of. What are the OPs to conclude if the farmed Atlantic they try also is strong, that they can cross that off their list? Maybe they try a Yukon white king in a restaurant they DO like, and then they think overything else is "fishy"?

                                              Farmed fish are usually fed processed, pelletized food made from wastes. They would be even more colorless (thereby suggesting mildness) if they also didn't have dye added to their feed. They are far more prone to parasites, and the wild smolts that pass by the pens are more prone to get the parasites. From an ecological standpoint, salmon fed sh*t in a landlocked pond in China is better than US and Canadian pen-raised.

                                              Aloha,
                                              Kaleo

                                              1. re: kaleokahu

                                                Maybe they try a Yukon white king in a restaurant .........

                                                __________________________

                                                If anyone is lucky enough to actually try that fish, and still proclaim it "fishy" then they should be banished to a lifetime of white rice garnished with saltine crackers.

                                                1. re: ipsedixit

                                                  To me, the expression "fishy" means that the fish has either started going off, or has already gone off. Truly fresh fish just smells like the ocean.

                                                  1. re: Tripeler

                                                    But then I have trouble describing fuller flavored fish like Bluefish and Mackerel. They are rich fish that many describe as fishy even when they are right out of the water. I love them by the way, I just wonder if we need new terms in our food vocabulary!
                                                    JeremyEG
                                                    HomeCookLocavore.com

                                                    1. re: JeremyEG

                                                      Usually "fishy" is just convenient shorthand for folks who don't like fish generally.

                                                      It's like when someone gets a nice venison tenderloin or a lamb chop and takes one bite and says, "it's too gamey" when in fact there's nothing wrong with the meat except that it tastes like, well, deer and lamb, respectively.

                                                      1. re: ipsedixit

                                                        That's making want to cook venison tonight. : )
                                                        There is a different flavor though when fish is past it's prime and it's not the same taste as a full flavored fresh fish.
                                                        JeremyEG
                                                        HomeCookLocavore.com

                                          2. re: ipsedixit

                                            Agreed. Wild King and Sockeye are high in oils which salmon lovers like myself cherish but which give that stronger salmon flavor. These are darker, almost a deep red in color. Atlantic, farmed salmon are light pink, have little of that salmon flavor and to me are inferior but are much milder. Coho and Silverlight salmon are also lower in fat (and are cheaper like Atlantic) and are slightly less "fishy".

                                            1. re: LorenM

                                              Coho is what you want buy you'd have to order it from an Alaskan based online source.

                                              1. re: Sam Salmon

                                                Hi, Sam:

                                                Coho (silvers) are good, and just as likely to spoil as any other salmon. They may not fish them in Florida, but they run the West Coast all the way down to Monterrey. So Alaska isn't the only choice.

                                                Kaleo

                                                1. re: kaleokahu

                                                  They sell bags of frozen coho at Target if that's your thing. Never bought them but have definitely seen them there.

                                                  1. re: kaleokahu

                                                    Monterrey or Monterey?

                                                    1. re: ricepad

                                                      Hi, ricepad. That would be Monterey, CA. My bad.

                                                    2. re: kaleokahu

                                                      What's your point?

                                                      I live in BC and catch/kill/smoke my own Coho yearly but anyone from Florida is going to have to rely on Alaskan product for a quality meal since there is no commercial Coho fishery anywhere else in the USA.

                                                      Little BC Coho is sent south-we eat most of it ourselves.

                                                      1. re: Sam Salmon

                                                        Hi, Sam:

                                                        Good thing you're killing them before smoking. The sound they make when they cough! Auwe!

                                                        "[T]here is no commercial Coho fishery anywhere else in the USA." Not according to NOAA/NMFS. www.nmfs.noaa.gov/fishwatch/species/c...

                                                        And a lot of the "Alaskan" and "BC" coho are trying to get back to WA rivers.

                                                        Aloha,
                                                        Kaleo

                                                    3. re: Sam Salmon

                                                      You can order fresh coho from www.wildsalmonseafood.com. They are in Seattle, and ship overnight. Their fish is outstanding. (BTW, the coho season has just started.)

                                                      1. re: pikawicca

                                                        Vital Choice is good, too. I don't know how the prices compare.

                                                2. what about arctic char? i've always thought of it as a lighter milder salmon.

                                                  1. FWIW, and I could be wrong, but I don't think there's a wild or farmed salmon fishery in China...my guess is they're just processing them there (after growing or harvesting them elsewhere). If so, and it's wild salmon and not farmed, it may be a good choice...

                                                    8 Replies
                                                    1. re: xanadude

                                                      Hi, xana:

                                                      You'd think so, but any nation with boats afloat can have a fishery. They just fish outside (or in) somebody else's. Poland, for instance has an enormous fishing fleet, and they're basically landlocked.

                                                      The Chinese launder their adulterated honey, why not salmon?

                                                      Aloha,
                                                      Kaleo

                                                      1. re: kaleokahu

                                                        China has the world's largest aquaculture industry and Salmon is there in the mix somewhere-believe it.

                                                        1. re: Sam Salmon

                                                          So what are they feeding them or not feeding them to make them not taste like salmon? Or are they really trout dyed pink?

                                                          1. re: babette feasts

                                                            chicken litter.

                                                            1. re: babette feasts

                                                              Based on OP's comment I think the question should be what are they feeding them to make them NOT taste like salmon? It might be a pink-fleshed fish being sold as salmon that really isn't. Not necessarily dyed :)

                                                              1. re: hsk

                                                                What are some other normally pink-fleshed fish? Nothing comes to mind immediately.

                                                                1. re: babette feasts

                                                                  Arctic Char, and Steelhead Trout

                                                                  1. re: ipsedixit

                                                                    And pink salmon, which is one of the five varieties we grew up eating in BC (the others were Chinook, coho, sockeye and chum). I've never been a fan of sockeye, because I find it too "fishy" (there's that word again) and strong tasting. I prefer pink or coho, even Chinook, none of which are really red like sockeye. I think I got spoiled getting them so fresh and baking them whole on the barbeque :-). My favourite salmon alternative at the moment is arctic char as mentioned above.

                                                                    This link might just confuse the OP more but it made me chuckle and think, as I so often do about food, "to each, his own" : http://www.anglingbc.com/index.cfm/pa...

                                                      2. If you don't like fishy tasting fish stay away from red fleshed fish like salmon and trout.

                                                        I assume you live in Florida based on your handle. Why not get grouper? It's mild and tastes great. If you want omega 3 just take a pill.

                                                        BTW I thought Costco sourced their salmon from one of the Scandinavian countrys. Don't know if it is farm raised or not.

                                                        1 Reply
                                                        1. re: cajundave

                                                          Hi, Cajundave:

                                                          The Grouper I've had has been great, but fresh salmon and trout don't taste fishy. The OPs could just as easily been from AK, asking about "less-fishy" Grouper shipped from the right coast.

                                                          REALLY red fish like ahi aren't fishy, either.

                                                          Aloha,
                                                          Kaleo

                                                        2. Try arctic char; it's delicious, a cross between salmon and brook trout. I hate sockeye, it literally makes me retch, and I'm a salmon lover. I love king salmon, it's very rich and fatty unlike sockeye, but the flavor is mild. You'll both love the char, though.

                                                          16 Replies
                                                          1. re: mcf

                                                            I agree with the arctic char, absolutely delicious. That being said, I actually haven't seen it at my local fish monger in quite some time and I do shop there weekly. For dinner tonight I had a farm raised (from Idaho) trout, was delicious. I also hate sockeye, it seems dry and just nasty, there's a reason it's cheaper!

                                                            1. re: Rick

                                                              Char has been here but at $18 or more per lb this year. High as in season wild King salmon usually is. :-(

                                                              1. re: mcf

                                                                $18! I think it was right around $10/lb last time I bought it!

                                                            2. re: mcf

                                                              Just curious- why does sockeye make you wretch? I have a had it numerous times and it's fattier than Coho,Sliverlight and Atlantic but not as much as King (Chinook). Is King the only one you eat? To me sockeye seems to come in 2nd in the "fatty" category. Both King and Sockeye don't seem "mild" in the world of salmon I've experienced, though they are the best in my opinion. I could be wrong. Where is Sam Salmon when you need him?

                                                              1. re: LorenM

                                                                I don't know why it does, it's involuntary and I'm not prone to food aversions. I'm a salmon lover and no other food does that to me. The color is obnoxious, but I think it's the texture. I can't eat it smoked, either. The leanness, I think. (BTW, that's retch with an 'r' if it's not about being one. ;-)) I don't know how you could describe sockeye as fatty at all, but while I don't love the others, they don't make me retch... King is still best, IMO.

                                                                1. re: mcf

                                                                  Oh, no argument there! King is the best! Had some Copper River King salmon about a month ago. It was awesome! The sockeye is an almost ruby red, I have noticed but seems fatty, but maybe it's just because I have a fondness for olive oil or better yet- tarragon butter on my salmon!

                                                                  Oh, pardon the wretch/ retch thing, please. I am used to using barf and hurl!

                                                                  1. re: LorenM

                                                                    Sockeye is very lean, interesting that you perceive it as fatty.

                                                              2. re: mcf

                                                                Hi, mcf:

                                                                Nothing personal, but I'm getting a little tired of people claiming sockeye isn't fatty. It varies by run, of course (some sockeye being fattier than some kings), but the average % fat by weight is 11% for sockeye and 13.4 for kings--hardly a huge difference. See, http://www.scribd.com/doc/50330216/14.... No one would squawk over a 2.4% difference in fat content between two grinds of hamburger or sausage.

                                                                Kings have more EPA, but sockeye has just as much DHA. Ironically, farmed Atlantic has the best total total EPA+DHA number, and a 12.4% fat content.

                                                                From a culinary standpoint, IMO sockeye can be better than kings in some preparations. The latter are almost always thicker in cross-section, and the thinner sockeye fillets take the court boullion, smoke, brine or dry cure further into what will be your piece of poached, kippered or smoked fish. For the same reason, the pellicle that forms will be proportionately thicker with sockeye, and the cooked fish flakes thinner than it does with kings.

                                                                Kings are still my go-to for long, slow beach barbeques and grilling, though.

                                                                Aloha,
                                                                Kaleo

                                                                1. re: kaleokahu

                                                                  Curious, have you had the chance to try white King Salmon? Utterly outrageous. In a good way.

                                                                  And, in my opinion, is definitely milder than regular King Salmon. But not mild in a bad way, and certainly not mild in the sense it is bland or insipid; rather it just taste less like regular salmon with a unique taste all unto its own. Sweeter and more floral might be a good way to describe white King Salmon.

                                                                  1. re: ipsedixit

                                                                    Hi, ipse:

                                                                    Yes, I've had white kings, even one Yukon. Your description is apt. I would add "more buttery". I have no data to back it up, but I am told that they hold even more fat than the 13+% their colored cousins do. Maybe something to do with metabolizing the feed compounds rather than laying it down in the flesh.

                                                                    Used to be (before boards like CH and celebrity chef shows) that white kings were thought of as trash fish. The could be had for much less, or for the asking (so could halibut cheeks and oxtails, though).

                                                                    Sometime before I die I would like to try a fresh Yukon white king killed ike jima-style in my presence. That would be my salmon ne plus ultra.

                                                                    Aloha,
                                                                    Kaleo

                                                                  2. re: kaleokahu

                                                                    Sockeye is very distinctively leaner to me, at least what's in my markets, than King, which is so fatty that it's creamy in texture. I've noted that sockeye dries out much more easily when grilled for this reason. And yes, I do know that fat content varies depending upon source as well as variety. You can quote all the stats you want, but that's a big % less in fat content and it makes it completely unpalatable to me.

                                                                    1. re: mcf

                                                                      Hi, mcf:

                                                                      To each his own.

                                                                      Might it be possible that your grilled sockeye dries up easily because it's so much thinner in cross-section (i.e., you're putting a thin piece of fish on a hot grille)? IME, even steaked out pretty "tall", smaller fish don't tend to stay moist on the grille--if you want grille marks. Kings, being thicker, tend to yield "cube-ier" portions that cook more slowly, allowing grille marks. I think that has more to do with thicker portion (more thermal mass) than the small difference in fat content. If you want to run a test, try grilling a piece of the farmed Atlantic, which has even more fat per gram than kings.

                                                                      Do you buy your hamburger 80% lean or 77.6%? Is one unpalatable to you?

                                                                      Aloha,
                                                                      Kaleo

                                                                      1. re: kaleokahu

                                                                        When you cook/bake/grill/poach sockeye compared to king, it doesn't ooze fat, not ever in my experience. There's a notable visual, taste and textural difference. I dunneednosteenking percentages to know that, thanks.

                                                                        I've never overcooked fish because another variety is thicker. And again, no matter how you cook sockeye, it does not ooze nearly the fat or have it softened inside when cooked to med or med/rare, IME.

                                                                        I'm pretty sure I don't need instruction on how to grill or otherwise cook salmon, but thanks for assuming I didn't know.

                                                                        1. re: mcf

                                                                          Hi, mcf:

                                                                          No need to take offense when none was given.

                                                                          I kipper and smoke a lot of salmon, and I *frequently* have sockeye that ooze fat up through the pellicle.

                                                                          I'm unsure of your meaning when you say sockey doesn't "have it softened inside when cooked..." Is your experience with sockeye that it gets tougher as you cook it?

                                                                          Perhaps "med" isn't a good finish for thin fillets of tender fish? Oh, darn, there I go again. You enjoy however you're doing it, and definitely keep doing it, OK?

                                                                          Aloha,
                                                                          Kaleo

                                                                          1. re: kaleokahu

                                                                            My experience with sockeye is that it is leaner, dryer, has an appalling texture that makes me gag no matter how rare or cooked it is, or cold smoked only.

                                                                            I have never cooked fish til it was tough, a complaint of my dried out fish loving husband. Comparing the miniscule droplets of fat from sockeye to king should help you to distinguish between lean and fatty salmon.

                                                                            I hate the way it looks, tastes and it makes me gag. I have no reason to be cooking it to any degree of doneness at all, given those facts.

                                                                            1. re: mcf

                                                                              Hi, mcf:

                                                                              Well, OK then... You don't care for sockeye. Not one little bit. You hate it and it appalls you right back. Julia herself could rise to properly cook you a fat, fresh one and you'd retch and gag. I get it.

                                                                              I'm told "Hating the Chow" is OK. Personally, I hate, *hate* HATE honeydew melon (the rest of the muskmelons are divine)..

                                                                              But say, what if you accidentally swallowed something that could be poisonous? Which species of salmon would you choose as a mild emetic?

                                                                              Aloha,
                                                                              Kaleo