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Turkey Breast Suggestions?

r
rchlst Jun 20, 2011 09:44 AM

I've got a giant boneless turkey breast in my fridge and would love some recipe suggestions! I usually just put some spices and olive oil on it and cook it but that's kind fo boring.

Any suggestions? I'm thinking that a glaze would be nice but would love to hear your thoughts (or suggestions for how to glaze it!)

Thanks!
Rachel

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    escondido123 Jun 20, 2011 10:15 AM

    I would slice/pound it into paillards, then salt and pepper, dip in flour, egg, fresh bread crumbs and fry until crispy. Serve with lemon and/or chutney of your choice.

    1. monavano Jun 20, 2011 10:22 AM

      I agree with slicing and pounding. You can make turkey tetrazini or turkey parmagina.
      I also like grilling it and slathering bbq sauce on at the end.

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        Bigley9 Jun 20, 2011 10:31 AM

        I marinate mine in soy sauce, seasame oil, lemon juice and thyme and then raost (broil first to crisp the skin if you like) and then serve it sliced at room temp with a cilantro-lime mayonaise

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          valerie Jun 20, 2011 11:06 AM

          I have made a boneless skinless turkey breast using Barefoot Contessa's Indonesian Ginger Chicken recipe. It works well.

          http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/in...

          1. greygarious Jun 20, 2011 11:48 AM

            If the bone is too hard to cut through, slice down along the breastbone on one side to remove half of the whole breast. Roast the boneless piece or slice it into cutlets to bread and sautee.
            Slice some of the raw meat off the bone side, cube, and use for turkey stew, chili, or a la king.
            With the remaining meat-on-bone, make stock. Once that meat has poached to done-ness, you can remove some or all of it and freeze, using later for sandwiches or salads.

            1 Reply
            1. re: greygarious
              v
              valerie Jun 20, 2011 02:13 PM

              Just fyi...the OP has a boneless breast.

            2. RealMenJulienne Jun 20, 2011 01:28 PM

              I would cut it into two or three equally sized pieces and generously season with salt, pepper, cumin, and a heavy dose of lime juice. After an overnight chill in the fridge, sear all exposed surfaces with vegetable oil in a heavy pan. Remove the meat and saute a couple sliced onions in the same pan until slightly caramelized. Deglaze the pan with a little orange juice, then roast turkey, sliced onions, and deglazed fluid in a covered vessel on low heat. When it's done, let the meat cool a bit before pulling it apart and mixing with the caramelized onion/reduced liquid in the bottom of the roasting pan. Finish with a generous squeeze of lime juice and chopped cilantro. This makes a good filling for tacos and sandwiches.

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                brooklynkoshereater Jun 20, 2011 07:17 PM

                I chop it into cubes and marinate with lots of olive oil, minced garlic, and a bunch of shwarma-spice (turmeric, curry, cumin, etc.). Then I saute some minced shallots, and toss the cubed meat, spices, and olive oil in. I used the cooked shwarma with pita, rice, salad, whatever-

                1. roxlet Jun 21, 2011 04:50 AM

                  Mario Batali has a porchetta style turkey breast stuffed with sausage and cooked on the charcoal rotisserie that looks amazing. We were going to make it this past weekend, but all we could find at the last minute were frozen turkey breasts.

                  1. monavano Jun 21, 2011 05:37 AM

                    Regarding your glaze thought- a balsamic and molasses glaze would be lovely.

                    1. r
                      rchlst Jun 28, 2011 08:52 AM

                      Thanks everyone for your great suggestions!! I can't wait to try them all :-)

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                        TomMeg1970 Jun 28, 2011 12:18 PM

                        First I would probably brine it for an hour per pound in 1/4 cup kosher salt and 2 tbs of sugar for every quart of water needed to cover the meat.

                        Then I might:

                        --Butterfly it and pound it into as large and rectangular piece as you can. Smear it with something tasty: some combination of olives, roasted pepper, salty cheese, cured pork, sundried tomatoes, nuts, capers, parsley. Roll it up and tie it. Roast it at 350 or so until it's done.

                        --Same as above but use porchetta seasonings (garlic, rosemary, sage, capers, lemon zest, salt and pepper--go easy on the herbs)

                        --Same as above but use a paste made out of equal parts white peppercorns, garlic and cilantro roots (or stems), thinned with a little fish sauce and lime juice.

                        1. BernalKC Nov 21, 2011 09:51 AM

                          Time to bump this topic. I plan to roast a 5-6# full, skin-on turkey breast to augment my Thanksgiving bird. So I'm looking for a tasty way to roast the breast in a slow oven (325) alongside the big bird.

                          I'm looking at a stuffed, rolled breast wrapped in bacon. I'll have plenty of stuffing to use in the roll. Not sure if the bacon wrapping will crisp up in a slow oven, if I'll need to use the time when the main bird rests to raise the temp to crisp it up? Wondering if I use a thin cut pancetta instead of bacon, can I skip the pan sear step?

                          I'm also interested in an 'en croute' recipe where i would cover the breast with a puff pastry layer. Surprised that I can't find such a recipe, thinking it might be an easier alternative to the stuff-roll-tie-sear plan.

                          1. ChristinaMason Nov 21, 2011 10:06 AM

                            To the OP: turkey breast roulade is delicious and a nice way to fancy up a rather boring piece of meat. You can cut it open like a book, then pound thin and cover in your favorite stuffing/pesto, roll up and secure with toothpicks or twine, then roast. It's delicious and very pretty, too. Lots of recipes online. It's nice if you brine the meat a bit first if you have time, too.

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