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Roasting Garlic- Best ways/experiences?

  • Quine Jun 8, 2011 03:39 PM
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I want to roast a bunch of garlic. I have a small glass dish that will fit in a toaster oven (why use big for such a small job?) I think the pan will hold maybe a dozen of the garlic heads I have, got some Spanish EV Olive Oil and want to also save the oil from the roasting.

Give me ideas please!

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  1. 1. Peel the white outer layer away but leave the coverings n the individual cloves.
    2. Cut about 1/8 - 1/4 inch off the top of the nested cloves, exposing the meat in the cloves.
    3. Drizzle a light coating of oil (olive oil or whatever oil you like) over the entire head. Rub the garlic to ensure the oil invades all crevices.
    3. Place the garlic on a parchment covered baking sheet and load into a preheated 400 degree oven for about 30 - 35 minutes or until the garlic is tender (soft to the touch).
    You can wrap the garlic in aluminum foil if you like. It helps to preserve some of the moisture but it's a matter of individual taste whether one method is superior to the other.
    4. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool. The garlic should be soft and easily squeezed from the cloves by squeezing at their base.

    2 Replies
    1. re: todao

      TY! Do you think a light coat of oil on the bottom of the dish will do instead of parchment?

      1. re: Quine

        I would think that wouldn't be a big deal.

        I use sea salt, and usually, just being lazy since it's only me, only roast 1-2 heads at a time, in heavy duty tin foil. Those fancy roasters aren't necessary. 400 for 30 min.-til the garlic is soft when pushed with a fork tine.

        I've also spaced out through the timer going off and have over roasted it. But guess what, it turns into a hard candy like version of crunchy garlic, which I eat anyway, lol.

    2. I do it very simply and I don't think that quantity would be an issue. I just the top off of the bulb to expose the cloves. Drizzle with evoo and salt. wrap in foil and toss in the toaster oven for 35 min or until caramelized on the outside and soft on the inside. Could do a big pan load in the oven.

      1. I tried a new-to-me method of roasting garlic (found in Epicurious's roasted garlic soup recipe) a year or two ago that I just love: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/foo...

        And while I thought the soup made for a nice gravy, that method of roasting was a keeper. The timing is, of course, subject to monitoring, as all cloves are not equal, but the separating of the cloves means that I can pull the pan out and test the smaller ones, pulling them out as needed, and then continue to roast the larger ones. I use a SS frying pan with a nicely fitted lid, instead of a glass baking dish. I do have to use more oil than the sheared bulb method, but it's worth it to me. And the garlic pops out of the clove just as easily as it does with the trimmed bulb.

        1. I have a Vidalia onion that I was thinking of slicing for the bottom of the pan, get a tad roasted onion, good idea?

          1. I just toss a whole head into the oven and take it out when it seems done...hasn't failed me yet. :)

            1. If doing whole bulbs, I cut the bottom slightly flat (if necessary), cut the top flat to expose the cloves and drizzle in olive oil, add salt and pepper and roast in either my lidded William Sonoma terra cotta garlic roaster or wrap in foil and place on a small cookie sheet.

              If doing individual cloves, I separate bulb but keep skins on each clove. Toss with olive oil and throw in a pyrex pie pan or pyrex loaf pan and toss in the oven. Cloves are done when a sharp knife easily pierces clove.

              It's all an easy process aside from making sure not to over roast the heads or cloves.

              As for the vadalia onion, I don't see a down side to roasing, but it may get a little soft if wrapped for entire time. if you desire a crust or browned outside, I'd unwrap at some point to get the dry air on the outer peel. Or toss under a broiler when cooked thru. Paul Prudohmme has a recipe for stuffed vadalias where you scoop out insides with melon baller prior to cooking and fill with sausage, sauted onions (the guts that you melon balled) among other items and then pan roast in oven. Decadent and yummy.

              http://www.chefpaul.com/site.php?page...

              BTW-I don;t use his pacakged/spice jar seasoning but make it fresh from scratch per his print recipe.