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[Newark, Delaware] Good Food, High and Low

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michelleats May 31, 2011 10:53 AM

Hi Delaware 'Hounds! Business brings me to Newark in a few days and I haven't found many reviews about local restaurants, except a few enthusiastic posts about Border Cafe, Home Grown Cafe and one interesting blurb about an Indian (north? south?) restaurant called Chingaari: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/750799

So a few questions:

- Are Border Cafe / Home Grown Cafe / Chingaari really all that?

- What cuisines does Newark, DE do well, generally? (I am coming from NYC.)

- Is Rasa Sayang Malaysian Cuisine worth a visit for someone who likes authentic Malaysian?

- What's new and interesting?

Any / all suggestions welcome, including places for takeout. I can sit down for a few nice meals, probably, but time may be limited.

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  1. CindyJ RE: michelleats May 31, 2011 03:59 PM

    Sad to say, if you're coming from NYC, you're going to find Newark, DE a culinary wasteland. If it was during the regular school year, I'd suggest Vita Nova which is upstairs at the Trebant Center at the U of DE. It's run by the students in the Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional Management program and it's quite good. But this is summer and I don't think the restaurant is open. Sorry I can't be more helpful -- or encouraging.

    11 Replies
    1. re: CindyJ
      m
      michelleats RE: CindyJ May 31, 2011 09:03 PM

      Actually, that is very helpful: It sounds like it may behoove me to just find a good market and make my own dinners in my (extended stay-type) hotel kitchen, if the restaurant situation is really so lackluster. I found an interesting reference (I think on Yelp) for Apna Bazaar, an Indian market, which might be fun to poke around in. And evidently Newark, DE has the world's best Shop Rite!

      All that said, there are a few restaurants that came up on Yelp that sounded like places I'd like to try, including D & H Jamaican and a Filipino barbecue place run out of a parking lot that I worry might now be defunct, since the location seems to be ungoogleable.

      If I do find anything good, I'll try to report back.

      Thanks, CindyJ!

      1. re: michelleats
        g
        genevapics RE: michelleats Jun 1, 2011 07:34 AM

        I have eaten at D&H Jamaican on a few occasions many years ago. The jerk chicken was very good as were the sides that I tried. They have plenty of room to dine in also. It's a nice little restaurant.

        As far as Filipino, I would recommend Balan Produce... (http://www.yelp.com/biz/balan-produce...) . They serve Filipino food (take out only) on the weekends. Their food is authentic and very good, just like it was made by your lola. Chicken BBQ, pansit and other specialties. Stay away from the Philippine Bread House & Restaurant! Their food is average at that's being kind. More importantly, they do not appreciate their customer base!!!

        If you have time, check out Woodside Farm Creamery for ice cream. It's a small farm not far from downtown Newark. They have their own cows that produce fresh milk for the ice cream. Some 30+ flavors including bacon. Great ice cream! They are open until 9:00 pm every night. (http://www.woodsidefarmcreamery.com/i... option=com_content&view=article&id=26&Itemid=15

        )

        Good luck.

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        Woodside Farm Creamery
        1310 Little Baltimore Rd, Hockessin, DE 19707

        1. re: genevapics
          m
          michelleats RE: genevapics Jun 1, 2011 02:49 PM

          Balan Produce was the Pinoy place I was thinking about, thanks! It's good to know they're still open and doing business, even if only on the weekend. I actually have some meetings during the day on Saturday, but if it doesn't close early, maybe I can catch the tail end.

          Oh wow, the Woodside Farm Creamery suggestion has me VERY excited. (Ice cream from cows on site?!) Thanks for the lead!

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          Woodside Farm Creamery
          1310 Little Baltimore Rd, Hockessin, DE 19707

          1. re: michelleats
            t
            travelmad478 RE: michelleats Jun 1, 2011 11:59 PM

            Woodside is great--the lines can get huge on hot summer weekends, so plan accordingly, but even if you have to wait on line for a while it is a great place to hang out and eat your ice cream afterwards. A very congenial spot, and definitely something you will not get in NY. I live nearby and visit frequently (again, this one is not in Newark, but it's about 20 minutes away).

            1. re: travelmad478
              m
              michelleats RE: travelmad478 Jun 2, 2011 02:42 PM

              Closes at 8 p.m., too... Might be just enough time for me to get there!

              1. re: michelleats
                bluehensfan RE: michelleats Jun 3, 2011 06:37 AM

                Woodside is great...

                if you have time you may want to try El Diablo Burritos in Wilmington. For what it is (burritos, soft tacos, quesadillas) it's on par with what you'd get in a much bigger city like Philly or NYC. Unfortunately I can't say that about much else in DE...

        2. re: michelleats
          CindyJ RE: michelleats Jun 1, 2011 08:07 AM

          If you're interested in take-out, there's a place called The Chicken House on the Kirkwood Highway (Rt. 2) that does a respectable job with Peruvian chicken. It's a hole-in-the-wall type of place in a strip mall, but I've taken out from there twice and I've been pleasantly surprised. There are a few tables and you can eat there, but it's pretty lackluster.

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          The Chicken House
          1224 Capitol Trl, Newark, DE 19711

          1. re: CindyJ
            m
            michelleats RE: CindyJ Jun 1, 2011 02:50 PM

            Sometimes the best food comes from the most hole-in-the-wall places. Thanks for the Chicken House lead, Cindy. I'll add that to my map of possible places to try.

            -----
            The Chicken House
            1224 Capitol Trl, Newark, DE 19711

            1. re: CindyJ
              scoopG RE: CindyJ Jun 2, 2011 02:47 PM

              Cindy, how does TCH compare to Juliana's?

              1. re: scoopG
                CindyJ RE: scoopG Jun 2, 2011 04:05 PM

                I've never been to Juliana's, so I can't say. But what led me to TCH in the first place was a conversation with a friend about Juliana's (she liked it a lot), and she told me about TCH.

                1. re: CindyJ
                  scoopG RE: CindyJ Jun 2, 2011 05:54 PM

                  Thanks! Juliana's was not bad. They are trying hard and I hope they succeed. My only complaint was that the fare was starch heavy - perhaps old style, down home Peruvian food to fill you up. Yuca fries but no vegetable dishes.

        3. m
          MrRuffles RE: michelleats Jun 1, 2011 08:59 AM

          As much as I liked it (and there's a rumor that it has closed), Chingaari wouldn't do much for someone from NYC - you could easily find comparable food in Curry Hill. Unfortunately, the pickings are a bit slim in Delaware.

          I like Rasa Sayang but I don't know how authenticly Malaysian it is.

          I'd recommend Szechuan on Kirkwood Highway for interesting Northern Chinese - make sure to ask for the Chinese menu. (But coming from NYC, Chinese might not be your first choice).

          There's also the Fair Hill Inn in Elkton, MD about 15 mins from Newark for a seasonal semi-"farm to table" experience.

          -----
          Fair Hill Inn
          3370 Singerly Rd, Elkton, MD 21921

          Chingaari
          270 University Dr, Newark, DE 19702

          8 Replies
          1. re: MrRuffles
            m
            michelleats RE: MrRuffles Jun 1, 2011 02:58 PM

            Ah, thanks for the honest opinions. NYC doesn't really have the best Chinese, either, but we do have pretty fair Sichuan, interestingly. I was reading about Fair Hill Inn on other Chowhound and possibly Yelp threads, I think. For some reason, I walked away with the impression that it was okay, but not amazing. Is that your take or do you think it's amazing?

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            Fair Hill Inn
            3370 Singerly Rd, Elkton, MD 21921

            1. re: michelleats
              m
              MrRuffles RE: michelleats Jun 2, 2011 07:51 AM

              Despite its name, Szechuan's specialties are not its Sichuan dishes (new owners took over last year but kept the same name so as not to confuse the local yokels who come for the buffet and Americanized Chinese) but its northern Chinese and Shanghainese dishes.

              I would be more inclined to call the Fair Hill Inn wonderful rather than amazing. It's a lovely place with excellent food, warm service, and an interesting wine list. They also have a nice selection of local cheeses, make their own salumi and cured meats, and use their own garden for fresh seasonal vegetables. We're always very happy after a meal there.

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              Fair Hill Inn
              3370 Singerly Rd, Elkton, MD 21921

              1. re: MrRuffles
                m
                michelleats RE: MrRuffles Jun 2, 2011 02:35 PM

                That sounds like a fair assessment. Thanks very much, MrRuffles!

              2. re: michelleats
                scoopG RE: michelleats Jun 2, 2011 02:16 PM

                You've been eating in the wrong NYC Chinese restaurants then!

              3. re: MrRuffles
                scoopG RE: MrRuffles Jun 2, 2011 02:14 PM

                Rasa Sayang is far from my authentic Malaysian. Szechuan on Kirkwood Highway has far too many American-ized Chinese dishes and is a major step down from what NYC has to offer in Chinese. Plus it serves up the dreaded buffet - always a bad sign.

                Yi Palace on 202 is a much better Chinese option.

                1. re: scoopG
                  m
                  MrRuffles RE: scoopG Jun 3, 2011 08:07 AM

                  The owners of Szechuan would probably agree with your assessment about the Chinese-American dishes and the buffet - in a conversation at their old restaurant Shang Hai, the owner's wife dismissively referred to theses dishes as "fast food". Unfortunately, it woulld be very difficult to stay in business without catering to clueless Delaweenians. (Though I have noticed an increasing number of native Chinese eating at Szechuan.)

                  I'm willing to overlook the buffet and the regular menu items to support them and keep sampling the cuisine from their Chinese menu.

                  1. re: MrRuffles
                    scoopG RE: MrRuffles Jun 3, 2011 10:48 AM

                    Try Yi Palace then - no buffet and no American-Chinese dishes either. Perhaps General Tso's but that is it. Also it is a question of location, perhaps you are closer to Szechuan/Kirkwood Highway. When I am in Wilmington (north) Kirkwood Highway is a bit of a stretch.

                2. re: MrRuffles
                  m
                  michelleats RE: MrRuffles Jun 5, 2011 10:49 PM

                  Hi MrRuffles, I called Chingaari to see if they were still open. They are. Unfortunately I wasn't able to have dinner there, though, since meetings ran a bit too late. The woman I spoke with said the kitchen closes around 10 most nights.

                  If anyone's curious, the restaurant is for the most part north Indian (according to the same woman), despite the fact that it has section for dosa and other south Indian standards on the menu.

                  -----
                  Chingaari
                  270 University Dr, Newark, DE 19702

                3. t
                  travelmad478 RE: michelleats Jun 1, 2011 02:03 PM

                  Nothing that you list is "all that" but if you set your expectations appropriately, you will not be disappointed. Rasa Sayang is good, but it is not in Newark (it's in Wilmington, as are many other restaurants, not so far of a drive). If you do a search for Wilmington you should come up with some good options. None of them will be as high quality as you can get in NY, but there are plenty that are just fine.

                  Newark does college bar food pretty well. That's about it. Luckily, it is not term time so you will not have to fight your way through crowds of UD students to eat or drink.

                  1 Reply
                  1. re: travelmad478
                    m
                    michelleats RE: travelmad478 Jun 1, 2011 03:00 PM

                    Well... There is a time and place for college bar food, too, right? There are objectively terrible places at my alma mater I still eat at religiously every time I go back to visit.

                    Thanks for your take!

                  2. f
                    Fiona RE: michelleats Jun 2, 2011 07:46 AM

                    Well - compared to New York Newark is a culinary wasteland but for a little sleepy town i tis not all terrible - just don't expect to be blown away but authentic ethinic or other amazing food. Since the U is closed for the summer places on Main Street are not insanely crowded with semi to totally drunk students. If you ar ehere on June 4th that is Newark Night. this is a street fair for which Main Street is lcosed to traffic and it is fun just to wander the street and pick up food as you go along, stopping in to a restaurant if the spirit movee you. Places on Main Street that I enjoy are -
                    -the small plates at the Stone Balloon Winehouse. If you go there ask if the chef can make you something with bacon. The bacon is house made from local hogs and is delicious! I have been less impressed with the "large plates"
                    Santa Fe on the corner of Main & Chapel Streets - decent Mexican with a good variety and good prices. There is a sizable Mexican community nearby so , although the food is not completely authentic, it is decent.
                    Ali Baba - I go there frequently but only for the eggplant salad - which you can also get to take out if you want something yummy to have in your room. It is a fun place to go with a group but, except for the eggplant salad, the food is nothing to write home about.
                    Iron Hill Brewery - a brew pub with very good beers and quite decent bar food.

                    I do not recommend going to the Deer Park unless it is just for a beer so you can say you've been. The Deer Park is a legend in town which is why Rachel Maddow did a live broadcast from there during the 2008 elecetion campaign. Unfortunately new owners remodelled and cleaaned the place up years ago and the food is not nearly as good as when it was a urine smelling dive. Ah well.
                    Home Grown has okay food but it is not unusual in any way.
                    Cucina Di Napoli is your basic red gravy Italian place with big portions. I have always liked it but the last time I went the owner/chef was not in and the food was not up to par so I am a little hesitant to recommend it.
                    Gellatto I find pretentious and overpriced but it is popular - the gellato is good and you can get a cone to to eat on your after dinner walk.
                    All the above places are on Main Street.
                    So- you won't starve. I hope you have good time! Remember Newark Night on the 4th if you are here- it is fun! It is an annual event that is held the week after the U closes and it celebrates the townies taking back the town for the summer.
                    Oops - I forgot - Border Cafe is not in town, it is near Christiana Mall (welcome to tax free shopping). The food is very good but the place is always jammed and they don't do take out or take reservations. When I go it is always at an off hour - like 3pm.
                    Again - have agood time!

                    -----
                    Iron Hill Brewery & Restaurant
                    147 E Main St, Newark, DE 19711

                    Stone Balloon Winehouse
                    115 East Main Street, Newark, DE 19711

                    4 Replies
                    1. re: Fiona
                      m
                      michelleats RE: Fiona Jun 2, 2011 02:40 PM

                      What a fantastic list, Fiona! I very much appreciate it.

                      I never like to make assumptions about food in small towns because I've really encountered some wonderful things in out of the way places. Some of the best scrapple I've ever had was from a small truck stop / cafe in the middle of nowhere, PA.

                      I was actually reading about a traditional prep for pork in DE, possibly during colonial times, which involved smoking and then dry curing a pig. I think this was then shaved thin for serving. (Hopefully I'm not bastardizing too many facts, here.) This sounded wonderful to me, possibly like the kind of bacon Stone Balloon Winehouse produces in house.

                      Thanks for all the tips!

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                      Stone Balloon Winehouse
                      115 East Main Street, Newark, DE 19711

                      1. re: michelleats
                        sal_acid RE: michelleats Jun 3, 2011 06:40 AM

                        Nonna's for Italian. Probably the best restaurant in the Newark area.

                        Cafe Gelato is not that great. Its a local favorite, which tells you a lot about local taste. The menu looks much better than it is executed. Not horrible, just not great.

                        1. re: sal_acid
                          m
                          michelleats RE: sal_acid Jun 3, 2011 07:39 PM

                          Thanks for the rec. What do you like at Nonna's?

                          1. re: michelleats
                            sal_acid RE: michelleats Jun 4, 2011 08:24 PM

                            Nonna's does great veal dishes. Some of their appetizers are quite good too. I tend to get either whatever special app they are running or a scallop app. For entree I often do veal saltimbocca, which is made the classic way and is just perfect. I've had some nice fish and ravioli there too.

                            Fair Hill Inn is 15 minutes away in Fair Hill MD. A great place with monthly seasonal menus that are as local as possible, house-made charcuterie, nice cheeses, good wine list. I really like the place.

                            None of this is up to the highest NYC standards, but both places are as upscale as the area can support and would hold their own in faster company

                            -----
                            Fair Hill Inn
                            3370 Singerly Rd, Elkton, MD 21921

                    2. m
                      michelleats RE: michelleats Jun 3, 2011 05:52 PM

                      Just dropped by Apna Bazaar, tonight, since it was on the way to my hotel and I was feeling too tired and lazy to try to find other places. It's a basic, but clean, Desi market with a few Middle Eastern offerings, as well. I picked up a few prepared items and snacks (frozen dosa, frozen vada, boxed avial, sev) and made a meal of it along with some tomatoes and cucumbers. The grocery carries some fairly high quality produce. Selection is not huge compared to, say, Patel Brothers, but there are all the basics: the usual variety of dals and flours and tamarinds, curry leaves, little hot green peppers.

                      1. m
                        michelleats RE: michelleats Jun 5, 2011 10:28 PM

                        Fiona and other 'hounds who've recommended Ali Baba: Thanks for steering me to a good meal. I have a few places to write up, still, and haven't given this as thorough an edit as I ought. But here it is:

                        ccompanying pictures here: http://www.girleatscity.com/2011/06/a...

                        By the time I was able to begin grubbing about for dinner on Saturday, the town of Newark, Delaware was largely kicked. Earlier, Newark Night -- an annual event that began as a resident's celebration of University of Delaware students leaving town at the end of the school year, but has since degenerated into a drunken, rowdy festival that rivals the most inspired of college celebrations -- had whirled through downtown Newark like a hurricane. The celebration left in its wake paper plates, greasy napkins and empty plastic cups littering the streets, a bunch of drunk, giddy kids, and a hefty contingent of police officers eyeing them suspiciously.

                        My mission was to find a place to eat in all the ruckus. Newark doesn't seem to be a town that caters to late-night diners, even on Newark Night and a quick scan down East Main Street, the town's restaurant row, didn't seem promising. Other than Coldstone Creamery, a fast food chain restaurant the next street over (which seemed to be the scene of a drug bust), and a number of rowdy bars, there was just one establishment in sight that still appeared to be serving food: Ali Baba, a small Middle Eastern restaurant, whose narrow front patio housed several contingents of hookah smokers and diners digging into delicious-looking plates of kebabs and hummus.

                        The friendly staff -- first generation Lebanese Americans, I'm guessing -- graciously welcomed us, though their kitchen must have been closing. We didn't want to keep them open any longer than we had to, so we got down to business.

                        We started with a fairly good version of chickpea and fava bean falafel ($5), served with lettuce, tomato, pickled turnip & tahini sauce. The large, heart-shaped falafel had very crunchy, thick crusts -- probably double fried -- and commendably moist innards. Pickled turnips were excellent, crisp and strongly flavored. Tomatoes were ripe and juicy. Both offset the fried falafel beautifully. The thin, white tahini sauce was intensely garlicky and delicious.

                        My main course, the Moroccan chicken ($14), "a choice of chicken with lemon & olives or chicken with harisa cumin sauce... served with a side of two Moroccan salads", was fall-off-the-bone tender. The harisa cumin sauce I chose did not carry a lot of heat (at least not compared to, say, Zabb Elee's papaya salads), but it was chock full of flavor. I wanted some rice to soak up some of the sauce. It was a bit oversalted without a starch to offset it.

                        The two salads I chose with the chicken were the eggplant salad and the Moroccan green salad, made with "tomato, cucumber, sweet pepper, garlic, parsley, onion, vinegar, olive oil, & special spices", according to the menu. The Moroccan green salad was shockingly excellent -- the best dish of the meal and probably the best thing I ate all weekend. Vegetables had been marinated in the dressing for a good amount of time and flavors were thoroughly infused. The salad was mostly comprised of juicy cucumber, cut in large, one-inch pieces, and ripe, sweet, juicy tomatoes. There was very little sweet pepper. I'm guessing the ratio of vegetables changes with the seasons and availability.

                        The Morrocan eggplant salad, "eggplant slowly simmered in oil, special spices, tomato, onion, parsley, & garlic", was also very good, with rich, well-developed flavors. The dish is by nature oily, which may be off-putting to some. I probably could've eaten the two substantial servings of salad by themselves and called it a day.

                        My dining companion ordered the kofte kebab ($12), "charbroiled ground beef, parsley, onions, & spices, served on a bed of Middle Eastern rice, or with a side of hommus, tabouli salad, & tahini sauce". The bite I had of the kofte was well flavored and somewhat moist, but a little bit tougher than my favorite versions. The side of hommus was excellent, a lovely, slightly thinner version with a good amount of tahini mixed in. Tabouli was even better: Lebanese style with very little bulgur and a high ratio of delicious, tender, non-bitter, flat leaf parsley. Flavors were again well developed.

                        li Baba turned out to be the most delicious meal I had all weekend, a wonderful, unexpected find. Some dishes would hold their own anywhere in the U.S. The menu is not terribly adventurous -- there's no pomegranate molasses-glazed chicken livers or raw lamb kibbe to be found -- but all the standards are there and executed exceptionally well, based on what I tried.

                        -----
                        Ali Baba Middle Eastern Cuisine
                        175 E Main St, Newark, DE 19711

                        2 Replies
                        1. re: michelleats
                          f
                          Fiona RE: michelleats Jun 6, 2011 04:00 AM

                          Unfortunately last year was the first year that Newark Night had degenerated into a drunken brawl and there was so much community protest that one thought that would be an end to it - that the police would prevent it from happening again. Apparently that was not the case which is too bad.
                          I also reread my original post and saw all the typos - I amust have been more tired than I thought - I am sorry about that.
                          Fiona

                          1. re: Fiona
                            m
                            michelleats RE: Fiona Jun 6, 2011 08:52 PM

                            Oh goodness, what type-os?

                            Re: Newark Night, I don't really think the police would really be able to control who comes to the event, if it's held. Based on what a few residents told me, it seems that the event just began attracting a younger crowd from surrounding towns, where before, mostly only older residents came, with their children and families. I didn't actually think the crowds were so ill behaved (other than the apparent drug bust, the worst thing I saw was a group of inebriated kids practicing capoeira on the sidewalk). It was just young... and exceptionally excited about life. :)

                            I wasn't actually able to catch Newark Night while it was going on. Is it a food festival in part? Do restaurants have stands in front of their restaurants?

                        2. m
                          michelleats RE: michelleats Jun 6, 2011 06:42 PM

                          Accompanying pictures here: http://www.girleatscity.com/2011/06/d...

                          I have to admit I don't know a lot about Delaware. I know it's a good state to incorporate in. It was the first state to ratify the U.S. Constitution. And its city of Newark (pronounced "new ark" rather than "nuwerk" like the one in New Jersey) requires drivers to make more U-turns per capita than any other place I've ever been.

                          I made at least five U-ys getting to D & H Jamaican Cuisine. Admittedly, four were unnecessary, since my GPS was having a conniption and kept guiding me past the turn I was supposed to take. It was like being in an Austin Powers movie. By the time I finally turned into the small strip mall where the restaurant is located, I felt as though I'd really earned myself a good meal.

                          The space is dark, with very high ceilings, and it has the pleasant, rustic feel of a barn turned bar in Texas. To the right, when you walk in, there's an area with tables for eating. To the left, there's a bar for drinking. And straight ahead, there's a counter for takeout, where, as you wait, you can salivate in front of the case of meat patties (not homemade, the barmaid honestly disclosed). There's also a refrigerated case full of Jamaican drinks: ginger beer, June plum juice, sorrel.

                          My dining companion and I opted for takeout, since we didn't have much time to eat. Unfortunately, we waited a good long while for our food, though other takeout customers came and went, probably because of the side order of fries. (They were fried to order and the frier probably wasn't hot, before.) He broke down and ate a beef patty while we waited.

                          When I finally sat down to eat, my jerk chicken ($9.99), a "baked leg quarter served with two sides" was a huge disappointment. There was hardly any heat to the two chicken drumsticks I received -- certainly no Scotch bonnet and only a bit of red pepper flakes -- and very little else by way of flavor, except salt. I have to wonder if somehow the kitchen had given me stew chicken instead of jerk, there was so little heat. For my sides, I chose rice & beans and the vegetable of the day, which was a humble sautee of cabbage and carrots. The rice and beans were fair, the vegetables were bland. The bit of fried sweet plantain in the container was nicely caramelized.

                          My dining companion's curried goat roti ($9.99) included flakey, but brittle roti, indicating that the flatbread had not been freshly made. Goat in the dish had a nice level of spice and a bit of pleasant, characteristic gaminess. The flavor was, however, strangely two-dimensional, despite the heavy dose of "curry powder". Also, there were a lot of small bones and bone fragments in the goat, which would have made the roti impossible to eat as a wrap without breaking a few teeth.

                          His sides of French fries ($2.50), a very generous serving, were well fried: crisp, light and not too greasy. The chef had waited until the oil was good and hot before frying, to his credit. But they were unsalted and our takeout bag unfortunately did not include salt or ketchup. (Neither did the office we were working from.

                          )

                          The restaurant is a nice break from all the fast food chains. Based on what I tried, I don't think I could fairly call what it serves good Jamaican food.

                          -----
                          D & H Jamaican Cuisine
                          748 E Chestnut Hill Rd, Newark, DE 19713

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