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Can heavy whipping cream that's been heated be cooled and whipped?

s
SShabazz May 17, 2011 11:22 PM

One of my besties wants her birthday cupcakes with "a hint of lavender" flavor, so I want to infuse the heavy whipping cream using dried culinary lavender. Has anyone ever done this? I was thinking of cold infusing in the fridge for a day or so, but will this give it a noticeable lavender flavor? Then I thought to heat the cream and lavender gently to release the oils into the cream, but will the cream whip to stiff peaks after that (of course I will let it cool and then get it cold in the fridge before whipping)? Is there any reason why heavy cream that's been heated wont whip well after it is cold again? Thnx

  1. s
    SShabazz May 18, 2011 04:45 PM

    Thanks so much for the replies, all. I think I'll go with the safer bet and cold steep it. I'm picking up my lavender on Thurs and dont have to make the cupcakes until Sat morning, so I'll have plenty of time to let in sit in the fridge. I'll report back...

    1. m
      maxie May 18, 2011 09:31 AM

      It works. Let it refrigerate overnight before whipping it.

      4 Replies
      1. re: maxie
        chefj May 18, 2011 03:56 PM

        +1
        I Steep Ginger, Green Tea, Cardamom or other flavorings in scalded HC, often and it whips up fine after being cooled.

        1. re: maxie
          chowser May 19, 2011 08:36 AM

          Yes--I do it all the time when I melt chocolate and heat the cream, then refrigerate for chocolate whipped cream. Steeping it is no different.

          1. re: chowser
            MikeG May 19, 2011 10:04 AM

            Ditto, I've done the same thing with chocolate, too. Boiling the cream might have some sort of adverse effect but just heating it (below a simmer) has never had any effect that I've noticed.

          2. re: maxie
            Adrienne May 19, 2011 10:07 AM

            I've done exactly that, with lavendar. I put 1-2 TB of lavendar into a teaball in the cream, and simmered it for like 20 minutes without bringing to a boil. Then I let it cool to room temp, then refrigerated overnight, it whipped up completely normally.

          3. JungMann May 18, 2011 09:23 AM

            When I make flavored creams like this, I only infuse a portion of the cream on the stove. I let it sit and come back to room temperature, refrigerate and then add it to the rest of my whipping cream. 1/4 c. of formerly heated cream doesn't seem to have a detrimental affect on the other 1 3/4 c.

            1 Reply
            1. re: JungMann
              rabaja May 18, 2011 10:12 AM

              This is what I do as well.
              For the lavender cream I would advocate a cold steeping time overnight. Lavender can get funky when brewed too assertively.

            2. a
              andieb May 18, 2011 08:55 AM

              this link may help...
              http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/529023

              1. cowboyardee May 18, 2011 08:30 AM

                I've never tried this. But I think you have reason to be optimistic. Because
                1) evaporated milk can be whipped
                2) unheated cream with added extracts can be whipped
                3) any cream you buy is pasteurized and thus has been heated already once (usually to an above-boiling temperature very briefly).

                Your other, even safer option if you have time is infusing the cream with lavender cold - just leave it sitting in the fridge for maybe 24 hours. You can compensate for the lack of heat with longer infusion time. Just like cold brewing coffee.

                1. sunshine842 May 17, 2011 11:35 PM

                  I'd be afraid of the heat forming protein chains, which I think would change the way it holds the air.

                  Maybe you could find a lavender syrup, which would give you flavor and sweet all at the same time.

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