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May 2011 COTM, PLENTY: Tomatoes, Leaves Cooked and Raw

PLENTY

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  1. This is the reporting thread for this Month's Cookbook of the Month, Plenty by Yotam Ottolenghi. The chapter is: Tomatoes, Leaves Cooked and Raw

    1. Am I right in thinking "Tomatoes" and "Leaves Cooked and Raw" are separate chapters? AFAIK tomato leaves are poisonous. (If this is obvious to some of you, please excuse my ignorance.)

      2 Replies
      1. re: al b. darned

        Indeed. Aren't tomatoes in the deadly nightshade family? This may be taking the shoots to roots trend a bit far!

        1. re: al b. darned

          Tomato leaves are definitely poisonous, but it's toxic only in large quantities: http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/co...

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          1. The original comment has been removed
            1. Baked Eggs with Yogurt and Chile (US. pg. 140)

              This recipe immediately caught my eye. In the US version, the picture of this dish is on the back cover and I had to find and cook asap.

              And, we loved it. It was a great breakfast dish. I did make some slight changes.

              Saute 3/4 lb of arugula in a large saute pan (I used a one lb). Then, make 4 holes in the wilted arugula and crack an egg in each hole. Place it in the oven for 10-15 minutes at 300 degrees.

              Meanwhile, melt 4 T butter and add kirmizi biber (I used Ottolenghi's suggestion of chile flakes and paprika) until the butter browns. then add chopped sage leaves. Also, on the side, mix 3/4 cup greek yogurt with a chopped garlic clove.

              When the eggs are finished, spoon the yogurt over the dish and then the butter sauce.

              So, the changes, I started the oven at the required 300 degrees. But, it was too low so after 10 minutes, I went to 325. That's what I would start at next time. Also, I moved the wilted arugula into a smaller dish and then cracked the eggs in it. That was a mistake bc the skillet was hot and the dish was not. Next time, I would leave it in the same skillet, despite the bigger size. I also used less yogurt and butter overall.

              Like I said, we loved this. It was so flavorful and a nice way to start the weekend.

               
               
              8 Replies
              1. re: beetlebug

                Thanks so much for that review beetlebug! I went through the book cover-to-cover today and so many dishes caught my eye but like you, I thought this was a stand-out. We'll definitely have this for breakfast this month. I was thinking of doing this w basil instead of sage...how do you think that would be?

                1. re: Breadcrumbs

                  Not sure about the basil substitution. I love fried sage in butter but am not sure how basil would work with butter. It does kill me to buy these herbs right now but it's still to early to plant things in the Northeast.

                  1. re: beetlebug

                    Hi beetlebug, I didn't remember that the sage was fried. I agree, that just wouldn't work w the basil. I love fried sage as well but I thought mr bc would say this reminded him too much of "Christmas Turkey" . . . maybe I could still go w basil but just not fry it first. A little more "Thai"

                2. re: beetlebug

                  Baked Eggs with Yoghurt and Chilli - p. 140

                  Made a loose version of this a couple nights ago and loved it. I thought I had everything on hand, but when I opened the fridge, I realized I had only a handful of arugula left and was out of Greek yoghurt. So I supplemented the arugula with some kale and sorrel, and instead of yoghurt, I dotted some fresh goat cheese on top. I also decided I wanted some bread with this, but instead of having it on the side, I tore it up and sprinkled it on top before the dish went in the oven. So I took some liberties with the recipe, that's for sure. What really made this dish, though, was the fried sage and chile butter over the top. I really loved the sage in this dish. Made a nice quick and easy supper.

                  1. re: beetlebug

                    Baked Eggs with Yogurt and Chile

                    Woke up this morning wanting to do something atypical for breakfast. I was happy to see in MelMM's review that the arugula substitution was successful, so I made this with spinach and sorrel. While the spinach turned bright green in the pan, the sorrel immediately turned brown.

                    I agree with beetlebug that a 300 degree oven is too slow, at least when you turn the eggs into a cold dish for baking. But I had difficulty with the eggs anyway, by the time the whites had solidified, the yolks were a bit overdone. But still delicious. I used piment d'espelette with chile flakes and sage in the butter. Very tasty. I'll be happy to try this again with arugula (if my market ever again decides to carry it).

                     
                    1. re: L.Nightshade

                      I baked mine in the same dish I used on the stove, and didn't have any issues. The recipe says to transfer to another dish, but it seems that this may not be the best solution, based on the reports so far. The key then, would be to have a short-handled skillet to start with that fits well in the oven.

                    2. re: beetlebug

                      I've made this a few times since this report. I used the same skillet to crack the eggs and to cook in the oven with much better results. Also, I've set the oven temperature a bit higher, somewhere between 325 - 350.

                      I had a huge amount of greens from the CSA. So, today, instead of the arugula, I used a head of kale, chard and beet greens. There were a lot of greens, probably a bit over a lb. These were just as delicious as the arugula and we felt extra virtuous in eating all these vegetables.

                      Next time, I may also stir fry some garlic before I wilt the greens.

                      This has been a delicious brunchy type of dish for us.

                      1. re: beetlebug

                        I'm so glad you posted this beetlebug! I had shied away from repeating it, but you've confirmed that my problem was probably the cold pan and the slow oven. I, too, have greens from the CSA, so your post is a great reminder of something tasty to do with them!