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Food Network/Cooking Channel + Pyrex + Broiler = ?

MplsM ary Apr 26, 2011 09:35 AM

I keep seeing chefs on cable food shows using Pyrex under a broiler.

From the Pyrexware website:

Warnings
FAILURE TO FOLLOW THE WARNINGS BELOW MAY RESULT IN PERSONAL INJURY OR PROPERTY DAMAGE, OR MAY CAUSE YOUR GLASSWARE TO BREAK OR SHATTER IMMEDIATELY OR LATER.**

DO NOT use on or under a flame or other direct heat source, including on a stove top, under a broiler, on a grill or in a toaster oven.

So, when people do just like Alton Brown and put their Pyrex dish filled with cheesy cauliflower under the broiler, and it explodes, is Alton Brown to blame?

Thoughts?

I think you should know and understand your own kitchenware and therefore Scripps et al are blameless. I'm guessing others might feel differently, especially after following a recipe with disastrous results.

** It's the "or later" part that gets me. Kinda covers all eventualities, doesn't it.

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  1. chowser RE: MplsM ary Apr 26, 2011 10:10 AM

    The original recipe for no knead bread used pyrex as an option for the bread. I followed, had great results but it was brought up here on the boards that it might not be safe. I wrote to them and they said they didn't recommend it. If my Pyrex had exploded, I would have blamed myself. There have been threads about Pyrex exploding on regular use so it's probably something people should be aware of, especially with extreme heat.

    1. paulj RE: MplsM ary Apr 26, 2011 12:14 PM

      When browning the cauliflower, the contents nearly fill the pan, and are already hot. Only the rim is exposed to the radiant heat. Broiling a couple of fish fillets would expose a lot more of the pan to the heat, and create larger thermal stresses.

      2 Replies
      1. re: paulj
        MplsM ary RE: paulj Apr 27, 2011 03:08 PM

        I watched the episode last night and the dish was filled at most halfway and was broiled for 6 - 8 minutes.

        I'm kind of singling out Alton Brown (though this is but the latest example), because he is the 'How To' guy on Food Network. His is a top oven, almost eye high. I smell disaster in the offing.

        1. re: MplsM ary
          paulj RE: MplsM ary Apr 27, 2011 05:14 PM

          The dish had already spent 20 minutes in a 400 deg oven. The temperature change when placed under the broiler for 8 minutes will not be significant.

          For the 2nd recipe using the broiler he uses a metal sheet pan. This is the kind of application where a glass container would not be suitable.

      2. s
        sommrluv RE: MplsM ary Apr 27, 2011 09:56 AM

        I think about this as well. There is a popular dessert blog that advises making little layered cakes in small ball jelly jars, freezing them, and popping them into the oven frozen.

        I'm surprised in our litigious society that this issue hasn't cropped up yet. People watch these shows/read the blogs to learn things.

        1. ttoommyy RE: MplsM ary Apr 27, 2011 01:44 PM

          There are hundreds of things TV chefs have done wrong like this over the years starting with Julia Child. Everyone is responsible for their own actions in their own homes.

          1. c
            celfie RE: MplsM ary Apr 27, 2011 02:45 PM

            having had a pyrex explode in my face (im still pretty) i'd take no chances

            1 Reply
            1. re: celfie
              jmckee RE: celfie Apr 27, 2011 03:02 PM

              I would never use pyrex under the broiler. Period.

              but I'm glad celfie is still pretty.

            2. c
              calliope_nh RE: MplsM ary Apr 27, 2011 04:56 PM

              if you use your Mom's or grandma's Pyrex like I do, you might be ok. It is my understanding that the older items were made differently than newer lines.

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