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ISO - Your favorite chili powder?

  • j

Hi - I want to cook up a batch, ( a couple of gallons) of chili, but I find the McCormick's supermarket chili powder to be less than flavorful. And I can't seem to find Wick Fowler's here. Anybody got some good suggestions on the West Side? Thanks.

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  1. There's a Penzey's in Santa Monica. http://www.penzeys.com/scstore/stores...

    I use their ground anchos most frequently, and a little cumin, but you have a lot of choices:

    http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penzey...

    http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penzey...

    1. Go to Penzeys in santa monica, do not pass go.
      1347 4th St (310) 917-5577. Mon.-Sat.: 10:00AM - 6:00PM

      1. Gebhardts is a good chili powder but Penzey's has some really good mixes. I would google award winning chili and see what blends of chiles they use in their recipes.

        2 Replies
          1. I like the kind from Indian markets. They are actually hot and flavorful.

            3 Replies
            1. re: apple7blue

              Ditto to that ... I just wish I could find a store that sold Indian-style chili powder in smaller quantities. I don't cook chili that often, and even after transferring the sack to an opaque container, by the time I finish it the heat - and most of the flavor - is long gone. And no, I don't have enough freezer space.

            2. Short of making your own chili powder, Red Lion makes some wonderful product I have enjoyed a great deal:

              www.betterthanhot.com

              1. Ditto folks here recommending Penzeys. I like their Chili 9000 personally.

                2 Replies
                1. re: Boston_Otter

                  Me too! That's the one I currently have in my cupboard!

                  1. re: Boston_Otter

                    I agree with the suggestion to visit Penzeys and blend your own or use one of their blends. In descending order a combo of chile ancho, guajillo, New Mexico, cumin, and garlic is a good place to start. There are some previous topics on this if the Search engine works for you.
                    Here is a pretty good one from the Chow database:
                    http://www.chow.com/recipes/10569-chi...

                    The cost of a commercial 'chili powder' (like Gebhardt) for gallons of chili will be needlessly expensive. You also don't know how long it has been in the supply chain 'pipeline'.
                    The chili powders available from IndoPak markets are usually of undefined content; to me they seem to be a fairly pure kind of very hot chile, but they could contain a lot of salt or filler.

                    For pure chile, don't overlook the little cel packets available everywhere but be very critical of the appearance. If it looks old, pass on it.

                  2. I like the blends that Surfas sells. They have a light and a dark chili powder, both of which are good. They sell it in 1 pound plastic containers with the shaky-lids.