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Garlic peeling made easy!

Quine Apr 14, 2011 01:43 PM

I am making some stock and wanted to throw in a bunch of garlic cloves, the mess, the smell on the hands, that weightless garlic paper that gets into places you don't want, when laziness or genius struck.

Recently I was given a large box of latex gloves by the Excellent piercing shop I just found. I have earrings that are made in India and very valuable, but the posts are 16 gauge, so I use 16 gauge piercing studs for everyday wear. Those drat little balls are hard to screw on. But with a pair of latex gloves, all is possible. (yeah a 20 Y.O. taught this 58 Y.O. dog a new trick)

So I have been trying out different uses (makes my beading/jewelry making so easy) and so I donned a pair and started in on the garlic cloves. I was able to grab that paper right of the clove, easy, just a slight rub on the difficult small cloves and no smell on hands, no mess, and about 100 times faster!

A box of gloves will now live in my kitchen I am sure other uses are going to be found.

  1. twyst Sep 30, 2011 07:31 AM

    Saw this a few days ago. Not sure it really works, but if it does, o_0 !

    http://www.vimeo.com/29605182

    EDIT: Hmmm chow wont let me post this link ><

    1. blue room Sep 29, 2011 08:58 PM

      This method might be worth trying:
      http://boingboing.net/2011/09/29/perc...

      8 Replies
      1. re: blue room
        bushwickgirl Sep 29, 2011 09:16 PM

        blue room, I got a file not found message when clicked on your link, maybe a CH issue tonight, as I got the same when checking links in other posts this p.m. but I wonder if you linked the video technique I saw this week in my Saveur email: crush the entire head of garlic with your palm to break it up, place in large bowl, paper skins and all, top with another large bowl of the same size, get a good grip on the bowls and shake, and I mean shake, the hell out of it, like 20-30 seconds with some gusto. Most of, if not all, the cloves were completely devoid of their skins. Amazing. I wouldn't have believed it if I didn't seen the results. It's like the silly tube technique, but larger and faster.

        I must try this.

        No muss, no sticky garlic fingers, nada.

        1. re: bushwickgirl
          coll Sep 29, 2011 09:26 PM

          Garlic fingers, bad. Latex gloves, good. Lots of garlic in bowl, even better.

          1. re: coll
            bushwickgirl Sep 29, 2011 09:47 PM

            Yes, thanks, coll. I was really surprised by the success of this technique; only caveat I could imagine is how much shaking power one has; the video was made by a rather robust guy with some shakitude. I'm going to try this, I still got some shakitude left.

            1. re: bushwickgirl
              coll Sep 29, 2011 09:51 PM

              Good for a day when you can't get to the gym!

              1. re: coll
                bushwickgirl Sep 29, 2011 10:41 PM

                Yup, build up them biceps!

          2. re: bushwickgirl
            blue room Sep 30, 2011 05:47 AM

            Yes, the Saveur method -- I wonder if the bowls must be that large? Probably, to get the distance to build up the speed before the little collisions which do the peeling.

            Sorry about the link -- I found the post on the Sept. 29, 2011 Boing Boing page.

            1. re: blue room
              John E. Sep 30, 2011 07:26 AM

              Your link is probably fine. It's a site problem because it appears no links are working right now.

              1. re: blue room
                Quine Sep 30, 2011 08:09 AM

                Ah, I saw that video posted over on G+ this week. I was wondering is smaller would work as well. I love the idea. But one still has to rummage around in the bowl to pull out the peeled ones (smelly fingers still) and both bowls need washing. But looks like so much darn fun!

          3. e
            ediblover Apr 22, 2011 01:21 PM

            I'm a bit confused. Why isn't the garlic just being crushed with a knife (or any other tool)? I just place the garlic on some plastic wrap and crush. The clingy stuff will hold the wrapping.

            7 Replies
            1. re: ediblover
              scubadoo97 Apr 22, 2011 01:42 PM

              Sometimes you don't want crushed garlic. There are times I want see through thin slices or minced or whole.

              1. re: scubadoo97
                petek Apr 22, 2011 02:17 PM

                Another neat garlic peeling trick is to soak them in cold water for about 5 minutes. I don't know the science behind it but it works like magic.

                1. re: petek
                  scubadoo97 Apr 22, 2011 05:34 PM

                  Interesting, I usually just cut the root end off and a bit of the tip end and the peel just comes right off with little effort.

                  1. re: scubadoo97
                    petek Apr 22, 2011 05:41 PM

                    The water trick is pretty cool.If you let them soak longer the peel almost falls right off.

                    1. re: scubadoo97
                      w
                      will47 Apr 22, 2011 07:41 PM

                      I cut the root end only. Even if you don't want to whack it with the flat of the blade to crush it, you can roll the blade a bit more gently on the clove, and the peel should just come off.

                      1. re: scubadoo97
                        m
                        monopod Sep 30, 2011 08:25 AM

                        This really depends on the type of garlic. Supermarket garlic is bred to have peels that are easy to remove. Heirloom or hardneck garlic (usually from the farmer's market or a farm stand, or grown at home) is much harder to peel, but - in my opinion - has much better and more nuanced flavor. Not a big difference if you're simmering it in soup or something, but in a dish that really features garlic it can make a huge difference.

                        1. re: monopod
                          Quine Sep 30, 2011 08:55 AM

                          Thanks did not know that!

                2. HillJ Apr 21, 2011 03:58 PM

                  Quine, you might recall the simple plastic gadget (looked like a rubber manicotti pasta) that was sold to peel raw garlic. You inserted a piece or two of raw garlic and rubbed it inside the tube for a few seconds and what came out of the tube was perfectly peeled garlic. Your latex gloves did the same thing!

                  I use the gloves for all sorts of things: onion chopping, grinding meat, cutting chicken, dealing with hot peppers or strong spices, beets and produce that tends to bleed.

                  It's a great tip and a handy kitchen tool!

                  2 Replies
                  1. re: HillJ
                    Quine Apr 22, 2011 07:11 AM

                    HillJ That silly tube is what made me think to try th gloves, the glove worked WAY better! Thanks.

                    1. re: Quine
                      John E. Apr 22, 2011 03:04 PM

                      I always thought the tube was silly too and used a rubber jar lid remover to peel large quantities of garlic. Then I got one of the tubular garlic peeler things at Goodwill for .49¢ and now I am a convert. The thing works much better than the pice of rubber jar opener and rinses clean. I wouldn't pay $8.99 for a new one, but will certainly use the one I found.

                  2. DeborahL Apr 21, 2011 03:52 PM

                    Apparently latex gloves are good for handling chile peppers too. CHOW food editor Jill Santopietro talked about it in her CHOW Cooks from Books video where she made carne adovada (aka pulled pork):

                    http://www.chow.com/food-news/70375/c...

                    1. mtngirlnv Apr 14, 2011 01:46 PM

                      Thanks for the tip!!

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