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What's Growing in Your Herb Garden?

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Even though it was cold and foggy today I could not stay out of the herb garden. I plan on growing calendula, borage, sage, rosemary and chives. The sorrel is returning ( that stuff is tough! ) along with the oregano and mint. Just wondering what other people are growing?

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  1. The perennials that are up so far are lavender (english and red kew), sage (bergarten, variegated, lemon, and common), tarragon, thyme (english, lemon, varigated), oregano (greek, mexican), winter savory, mints (pepper, spear, ginger, lemon balm), and chives (onion, garlic). The rosemary and italian parsley are still hiding out. Chammomile, although an annual, reseeds itself freely and there's seedlings of it everywhere. The annuals are seeded but not up yet. Cilantro, marjoram, basils (genovese, lemon, lime, cinnamon), fennel, dill. I started foraging wild garlic (not ramps) this week to hold us over until our domesticated garlic is mature. I haven't checked on the wild sorrel yet (thanks for the reminder!) but we've had a few meals with dandelion greens and jerusalem artichokes (sunchokes). We're broadcast sowing borage up in the orchard this year because it's a good companion cover crop for the fruit trees and the chickens like it but also because I want to crystallize the pretty little flowers it puts out. Not so fond of eating it. Too fuzzy.

    1 Reply
    1. re: morwen

      Didnt know that tidbit about borage. I'll have to spread some around under the fruit trees.

    2. this year i will have dill, fennel, chives, thyme, lemon thyme, cilantro, sage, pineapple sage, rosemary, tarragon, basil, thai basil, chervil, catnip (for tea), mint, flat leaf parsley and oregano.

      1. We STILL have a lot of snow on the ground so won't be planting anything for about 6 more weeks. I am having fun planning all the herbs I will plant, though! The only perennial herb here is chives - all else we must treat as annuals including mint, rosemary and so on.

        2 Replies
        1. re: chefathome

          Too cold for perennial mint! Wow.

          1. re: CCSPRINGS

            Yes. Our winters are long and cold (i.e. -40 or colder). Our prairie winds are atrocious (most days of the week are usually at least 40-70 km/hour). I'm a Master Gardener who feels misplaced! We do, however, own a house in Croatia where we escape to and where we will be living. So, we'll go from a Zone 1a to Zone 9. YAY!

        2. Being in southern CA, my perennials include rosemary, lavendar, chives, thyme, sage and oregano. Just planted some basil, dill and marjoram. Planning to add some curry leaf, cilantro and chocolate mint.

          1. Here in NH, chives are tall enough for a light harvest. Lovage is just poking out of the ground. Sage (common) and salad burnet stayed "green" under the snow. Sorrel is up. No sign of the variegated sages, they are iffy in our zone. Thyme is growing. Last weekend was my first time outside in the garden. Still have to clean up the herb garden. Garlic is just poking out in the vegetable garden. I put scented geraniums and a lemon verbena in the north window of our semi-heated garage. These were hardly watered all winter. Lemon verbena likes a dormant period. All are showing good growth so it's time to start hardening them off and re-potting. We won't talk about the rosemary who might have survived if I watered more than once a month.

            Parsley is starting up again.I usually get some before it puts up a seed head. I'm debating when to start my basils which I usually grow in pots along the kitchen walkway. The recent warm temps have me thinking "summer" but we can still get some very cold weather. Last frost date is May 20.

            1. Our chives,oregano and mint are back. So nice to have fresh herbs. We will have to plant the rest. While we get extremely humid and hot temps in southwest MO,we also get too cold to have any other herbs come back.