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Ginseng Root?

l
loganhunt Apr 8, 2011 12:33 PM

Hi everyone!

So I'm looking for ginseng root to make some ginseng tea, but I'm not sure where to find it. I've looked at local markets but I can't seem to find it. I'm interested in either the root itself to make the tea or already made ginseng tea (as long as it's the real stuff; sometimes it's only partially ginseng). Does anyone know where I can buy the root or the 100% ginseng tea in Culver City or near that area? Thanks!

  1. r
    rnp0123 Apr 8, 2011 01:37 PM

    Any Korean herbal market, such as Har Bin Deer Antler Trading Company on Western, will sell you all types of whole ginseng. Also can find it in pharmacies in China Town.

    -----
    China Town
    10935 Magnolia Ave, Riverside, CA 92505

    1. Baron Apr 8, 2011 04:31 PM

      The Ten Ren tea company has great teas. They also sell ginseng roots and powders. They have outlets downtown and in Monterey Park. You can also order from their website and save the drive.

      try: tentea.com

      1. ipsedixit Apr 8, 2011 10:05 PM

        Costco. You can get premium American Wisconsin Ginseng Root at Costco, often at 1/3 off most retail and mail order prices. Hard to beat the value and quality.

        But if those quantities at Costco are too much for you, try TS Emporium -- either in Chinatown or Monterey Park or Rowland Heights.

        1. d
          dgr123 Apr 11, 2011 01:38 PM

          You might try HERB PRODUCT CO., Magnolia Blvd. North Hollywood. They have been there for years. They are very careful about advising people who might want a diagnosis. Good Luck

          1. raytamsgv Apr 11, 2011 04:04 PM

            Do you have any particular type of ginseng in mind? It comes in different varieties.

            6 Replies
            1. re: raytamsgv
              l
              loganhunt Apr 12, 2011 08:37 AM

              Oh I didn't know there were different types of ginseng. I'm new to tea (recently converted from coffee, now I'm addicted to tea!) and I heard you can drink ginseng. Any recommendations?

              1. re: loganhunt
                raytamsgv Apr 12, 2011 12:21 PM

                Sorry, I don't have that expertise. I just know that my relatives have frequently discussed the merits of various types of ginseng.

                1. re: loganhunt
                  PeterL Apr 12, 2011 12:31 PM

                  The two different kinds I know of are American (Wisconsin, or "flower flag" ginseng. Flower flag refers to the flag of the United States) and Korean ginseng. One is hot and the other is cool. Hot and cool are Chinese medicinal concepts. So depending on your body type (either hot or cool) you can only drink ginseng that complements it. You need to have a Chinese medical doctor check out your body type so you'll know which kind of ginseng to take.

                  1. re: PeterL
                    PeterL Apr 12, 2011 07:03 PM

                    According to my wife US ginseng is cool, and Korean ginseng is hot.

                    1. re: PeterL
                      ipsedixit Apr 12, 2011 08:11 PM

                      That's not exactly right.

                      There are generally two different types of ginseng, Chinese Ginseng (Renshen) and Panax red ginseng. The former is generally "cooling" and the latter "warming", so for example people with high blood pressure should not take Panax red ginseng.

                      Korean ginseng is similar to Chinese ginseng in its relative cooling effects.

                      American ginseng (e.g. Wisconsin or even Canadian) is similar to Panax red ginseng, but less potent, but not always the case.

                      The cooling and warming effects of different types of ginseng is all relative because all ginseng is warming, as it is suppose to be "yang" in nature and thus works to increase the qi in the body.

                      All that said, I should add that if you are just going to be using ginseng in tea form (i.e. steeping in hot water), then just find a good quality ginseng root or slices and don't worry too much about provenance.

                      1. re: ipsedixit
                        l
                        loganhunt Apr 12, 2011 09:21 PM

                        Wow thanks! This was an incredible amount of helpful information. Thank you everyone!

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