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Indonesian Lapis Legit Cake (aka Dutch Spekkoek)?

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  • Lucki Mar 26, 2011 03:01 PM
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Lapis Legit is one treat that I miss from my travels in Indonesia.

Has anyone out there tried making this at home? Any tips, tricks or foolproof recipes that you could recommend would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!

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  1. Hrm, I have a recipe for Fatcake/Fatkoek from South Africa that is more or less the same as spekkoek though with more sugar. Not familiar with the Indonesian version- what's the texture like? Spongey, dense? How sweet? Can post recipe if you think it'll be close!

    3 Replies
    1. re: Words and Nosh

      I remember it being very dense. I also remember several different spices. I'm thinking nutmeg and cinnamon amongst others. More spicy than sweet I think. It also has lots of layers. I'd guess that a 2" thick cake has at least a dozen layers.

      I hope that I have the right Dutch name for the cake!

      1. re: Words and Nosh

        Fatcake (which is yeast-based) is not like spekkoek, which is a cake made of many, many layers, each baked separately with one added at a time. Sometimes it's called "Thousand Layer Cake". I keep asking my SO's mother for the family recipe, and she keeps turning me down, saying "Oh, it's so much effort that you'd never make it." Argh! Good spekkoek should be very spicy, more than sweet. Very dense and rich, so that a tiny sliver makes a good serving. (I think WandN might be thinking ollebollen, instead of spekkoek.)

        One of these days, I'm really going to have to demand the family secret. Otherwise, we purchase some from Indonesian stores in Los Angeles when we visit. Good luck to the OP!

        1. re: dustchick

          dustchick, you're right about difference between fatcake and spekkoek- i had a momentary brain fart there. Fatcake is v. similar to another sweet I had recently (and can't remember the name of that now as well) and isn't like spoekkoek. Sorry to the OP!

      2. Hello I got hooked on Spekkoek when I lived in Holland. I make it all the time, it is relatively easy just time consuming. Here is my tried an true recipie..when my friends find out that I am making the cake they want to come over and watch the process :) I am now inspired to make it today! The real fun is to see just how many layers you can make with the batter! My top was 18..

        Good luck and happy eating!

        Spekkoek (Thousand Layer Spice Cake) Recipe

        4 hours 115 min prep 1 cake

        1/2 Ib butter, softened
        i cup sugar
        10 large eggs, separated
        i pinch salt
        1 cup all-purpose flour
        2 teaspoons cinnamon
        1 teaspoon ginger
        1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
        1/2 teaspoon cardamom
        1/4 teaspoon cloves
        2 tablespoons confectioners' sugar
        1. Cream butter and sugar together with an electric mixer. Beat in egg
        yolks. In another bowl, using clean beaters, beat egg whites with salt
        until stiff. Fold into yolk mixture. Fold in flour.
        2. Divide batter between two bowls. Add combined spices to one bowl;
        stir well.
        3. Line the bottom of a buttered 9" round cake pan (or springform pan)
        with wax paper and butter the wax paper. Pour about 1/2 cup of the
        spice batter into the pan, spreading to form a thin layer. Place pan
        under a preheated broiler for 2 minutes, or until the layer is firm and
        very lightly browned. Spread 1/2 cup of the plain batter over the top
        and broil until firm. Repeat layering and broiling until all batter is
        used.
        4. Let cake cool, then remove from pan.

        Sprinkle top with confectioners' sugar.

        A good Spekkoek will have at least 12 layers or more. The heat of the broiler browns the top of each layer, giving the cut cake its neat horizontal striped look. It can also be frozen if wrapped Because of the richness of the cake, it tends to be served in very small pieces, usually thin
        slices.