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Lipton's Noodle Soup noodles, what kind are they?

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Okay, so I had some of my slave chlidren do some Google searching and they still haven't been able to uncover this mystery. (It would probably help if I taught them to read and write, but there just aren't enough hours in the day.) Honestly, this is even harder to unearth than the lost Sankara stones.

Anyway, I've made a few attempts at making homemade chicken noodle soup. I've got the homemade stock part down just fine. However, I'm still never pleased with the soup I end up with. Why? Because the traditional Pennsylvania Dutch style egg noodles from the grocery store just don't do it for me. I don't like their sort of blubbery non-descript texture.

What is my ideal chicken noodle soup noodle? If you can't already tell from the message topic, it's the noodles in Lipton's instant noodle soup packets. Yes, they're way to small--ideally I would like somehing a bit longer and wider--but overall, I really like the texture. I'm talking about noodles as found in their Spring Vegetable product. (I remember once many years ago, they also had a product called "Garden Vegetable." The broth was less overtly beefy/tomato, and the noodles were wider. Those noodles also had a great texture; very flat.)

I checked out a few web pages listing all kinds of different Asian noodles (some made from things besides flour, some pre-fried) and while some of them sound like they *may* be similar, I can't really be sure.

Is there anyone here "in the know" about what exact kind of noodles Lipton's uses for their soup mixes? Are such noodles available to buy or order anywhere?

Thank you very much in advance. Also, praise Kali.

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  1. Which "Pensylvania Dutch" brand noodles have you tried? I only ask because they do make one that's the same size/thinness, etc., of the Lipton soup noodles. Another good brand to look for is "Goodman's", who put out a dry noodle soup mix comparable to Lipton's. Goodman's also produces boxes of small varieties of egg pasta especially suitable for homemade soups.

    4 Replies
    1. re: Breezychow

      I have used both the traditional Pennsylvania Dutch wide noodles, but also the thinner ones. The thinner ones are closer in "shape" to the Lipton noodles, but the texture is the same "plain" (and kind of blubbery) texture as the wider PennDutch noodles, which is kind of what I wanted to get away from. Honestly, I think what I like best about the Lipton's noodles is that they are very thin (practically two-dimensional), and the texture. I do think it's possible that the texture is due to the type of "pre-frying" that Ramen type noodles go through. However, the noodles in traditional Ramen blocks aren't what I'm looking for either--maybe if they weren't in long roundish strands and closer to flat noodles, they might be closer to what I'm looking for, I don't know.

      Thank you for the Goodman's suggestion. I will check out their egg pasta to add to my homemade stock.

      1. re: Mola Ram

        Yeah, give Goodman's a try. I haven't tried their "Lipton-size" noodles, but have tried a type they put out that's itsy bitsy tiny squares - like 1/4" or less. They worked pretty well.

        1. re: Mola Ram

          have you tried these? i think it's been 20 years since i last had Lipton Noodle Soup, but from what i can recall they look like the thin noodles in the instant Cup-O-Soup.

          http://www.pennsylvaniadutchnoodles.c...

          1. re: goodhealthgourmet

            Thanks for the response. Yes, I have tried the PennDutch "fine" egg noodles. While they are definitely closer in size to the Lipton's, they still don't have the same texture.

            If I could describe the texture issue a bit more, it's almost like the Penn 'Dutch noodles (all sizes) are a little "too hearty." I mean, they're probably what most people would want in an egg noodle--honest and straightforward. However, I find that the noodles in Lipton's almost have a "sleazier" texture. They're not as "wheaty" as the Pennsylvania Dutch ones. I get the feeling that Lipton's are less healthy somehow. Again, I think it's possible that they have gone through a pre-frying process similar to what I have read that Ramen noodles go through. (But again, when I eat those very long stringy Ramen noodles in those brick packages, they seem way more rubbery than what I'm after. Maybe if they used that exact same noodle but shaped it into small paper-flat noodles, then I'd recognize the texture as Lipton's, but that's just pure speculation.)

      2. Check out the Hispanic/Latino aisle in supermarket. You can buy small bags of them(fideos)
        for about 50 cents a bag! I use them all the time in homemade chicken soup.

        2 Replies
        1. re: grangie angie

          I second this, fideos sounds like what you're looking for!

          1. re: sarahcooks

            I third this -- fideos are what you want.

        2. The first ingredient on the two packets of Lipton Instant Soup that I have in my pantry is: Enriched Egg Noodles.

          That said this linguine egg pasta could do the trick if you trimmed them to the correct length -
          http://www.amazon.com/Campofilone-Lin...

          Good luck. Post your results.

          2 Replies
          1. re: CDouglas

            That's approx. $6.50 per pound.....pretty pricey. I'd still try the fideos and see if that fits the bill!

            1. re: grangie angie

              True. These are a somewhat more reasonable replacement:
              http://www.amazon.com/Bechtle-German-...

          2. Thanks for the responses, you guys. I will definitely check out Goodman's and fideos. If I hit paydirt I'll let people know, just on the slim chance there are any other weirdos out there who also fetishize Lipton's noodles.

            1 Reply
            1. re: Mola Ram

              Well, geez - I've been eating Lipton's Noodle Soup all my life (especially when I don't feel good). There's this taste to the soup that I can't come close to duplicating, but the noodles, well, I buy the cheapest egg noodle angel hair pasta I can find, break it into small bits and throw it in the broth. Works for me.

            2. PLEASE let me know if you ever found these Lipton type noodles, I have been searching for years. You know what, I think they are the same little noodles also used in Rice a Roni maybe?

              1. I used to eat the Lipton soup chicken noodle mix as a kid and I feel that breaking up vermicelli noodles replicates them about as good as it gets.
                Not capellini. Not Angel hair.
                Vermicelli.

                4 Replies
                1. re: monavano

                  Monavano do you mean the Asian Vermicelli Rice noodles or are they with italian noodles such as spaghetti

                  1. re: darkmoondreamer

                    Italian dry pasta. It really did bring me back to the day!
                    Slurp.

                  2. re: monavano

                    To avoid a mess, work with your hands deep inside a clear plastic bag or brown paper bag while breaking the dry strands or cutting with scissors.

                    1. re: greygarious

                      Good ideas. I just take small handfuls at a time and twist and break in a couple places as I drop into water.

                  3. I found noodles that look just like the Lipton ones at Hmart. I can't remember what they were called, but if you have an Hmart near you, you could check.

                    1 Reply
                    1. re: jvanderh

                      Here they are: http://www.buyarabic.com/storeItem.as...

                    2. Barilla makes a product called "cut spaghetti". I love it in chicken soup.

                      http://www.barillaus.com/Products/66/...

                      1. I know this is a relatively old post, but I wanted to post this for anyone still interested:

                        I think that Lipton's noodles are probably pre-cooked and freeze-dried, which is why it's possible to just add hot water to the mix and soak for a couple minutes. Ramen, which is quickly fried (to give it its delicious flavor and cool boxy shape!), must be boiled for 2-3 minutes to soften the noodles. So you might want to take that in to consideration.

                        I don't know how you'd freeze-dry cooked noodles. I assume you'd need some sort of dehumidifier in a freezer or something because the noodles contain so much water (compared to, say, freeze drying onions). Btw, the cappellini corti that jvanderh recommends looks very much like the Lipton noodles.

                        1 Reply
                        1. re: Moochoux

                          Thanks for this response. I figured it was some special "non-normal" process like this. It occurred to me after I made my original post that the shapes in all the Lipton noodle packets are slightly different. (The one I was specifically craving was the one found in their now-defunct "Garden Vegetable" line which were relatively broad and flat; you could read a paper through them though.) But the one unifying factor in all these packets was you just add hot water and they were basically "cooked."

                          I guess I'll just reiterate the original request. Does anyone know of a line of noodles that have been pre-cooked (not necessary fried like Ramen) and dried again for the home cook?