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Cheese making course in or around Los Angeles?

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beezer33 Mar 20, 2011 11:17 PM

Does anyone know of a cheese making class or course in or around Los Angeles? I am specifically interested in goat cheese but any organic cheese making course would be helpful. Thanks.

  1. lil mikey Mar 21, 2011 06:39 AM

    Not sure exactly who does a course, but we get our cheesemaking supplies from the Home Wine, Beer and Cheesemaking shop in Woodland Hills. You may want to stop by or call and talk to them as they seem quite knowledgeable and might be able to steer you to a good place.

    http://homebeerwinecheese.com/

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      badmeow Mar 21, 2011 11:19 AM

      Hipcooks has a basic cheese making class, which I know includes goat cheese, mozzarella, ricotta, and maybe one or two others.

      4 Replies
      1. re: badmeow
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        beezer33 Mar 21, 2011 07:38 PM

        Thanks for the Hipcooks recommendation. I signed up for their fresh cheese class covering ricotta, mozzarella, chevre. But if anyone knows of an aged cheese class I would love to try making hard cheeses also. Thanks.

        1. re: beezer33
          mnosyne Mar 21, 2011 07:53 PM

          Where is Hipcooks?

          1. re: mnosyne
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            beezer33 Mar 22, 2011 02:42 PM

            http://www.hipcooks.com/

          2. re: beezer33
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            torchsong Aug 2, 2012 03:48 PM

            http://instituteofdomestictechnology....

            1 goat cheese in each of these classes. The gouda in 103 is a hard goats milk cheese.

        2. Das Ubergeek Jul 19, 2011 06:18 AM

          There are occasional cheesemaking courses at The Road Less Traveled in Santa Ana.

          1. Mr Taster Aug 2, 2012 05:11 PM

            The problem with a cheesemaking class is that it's not an instant process with results in 3 hours, like a pasta making class would be. Even for a quick paneer-like cheese, milk coagulation with lemon juice and subsequent cheesecloth straining takes at least a few hours, and the tastiest cheeses require time for the bacteria to poop out all that delicious flavor. A fresh cheese made in this way, while delicious, will have none of the complexity of a really well-aged cheese.

            My best recommendation would be to buy a good book, such as "Homemade Cheese: Recipes for 50 Cheeses from Artisan Cheesemakers", which walks you through all the steps and supplies you'll need to make a variety of cheeses at home.

            Mr Taster

            1. perk Aug 2, 2012 05:57 PM

              A fun mozarella making class at Andrew's Cheese Shop in Santa Monica.

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