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Brisket

  • j
  • jlix Mar 19, 2011 02:25 PM
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I want to make a brisket for passover and I need a killer recipe--I made one a few years ago with moroccan flavors but have no clue where I found that recipe! And I'm ready to try something new--

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  1. http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/386117
    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/275332
    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/281981
    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/505715
    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/553984
    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/697234
    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/559920
    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/314308
    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/275130
    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/658606
    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/607072
    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/713735
    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/509667
    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/724492

    there are also numerous threads about smoked and BBQ preparations.

    1. If you have Molly Stevens' All About Braising, try the rhubarb brisket. It is perfect for Passover, as it is really a spring recipe.
      If you don't have the book, I'll paraphrase for you if you are interested. She has about five brisket recipes, all really good, but this one screams PASSOVER!

      1. Do you have a smoker? Smoked brisket is just downright awesome.

        1 Reply
        1. re: jdmfish

          no smoker

        2. This is too late for you to use for Passover this year, but might be helpful for next year. Could this be the recipe you used for Moroccan Brisket?

          Serves 10 to 12

          5-to-6-lb. brisket of beef

          Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

          2 cloves garlic, peeled and halved

          1/4 cup olive oil

          1/4 tsp. turmeric or a few strands of saffron

          1 tsp. freshly grated ginger

          2 large Spanish onions, diced

          1/4 cup chopped celery with leaves

          1 small carrot, peeled and sliced in paper-thin rounds

          2 large fresh tomatoes, peeled and diced, or a 1 lb. can of stewed tomatoes

          1 lb. green olives

          1/2 cup water, if needed

          Juice of 1 lemon

          Sprinkle the brisket with salt and pepper and rub in the garlic. Sear the meat on all sides in a little bit of the olive oil in a heavy roasting pan with a cover. Remove.

          To the same pan, add the remaining olive oil, turmeric or saffron, and ginger and sauté a few minutes more. Sauté the onions until limp. Then add celery and carrots and sauté a few minutes more. Add the tomatoes and mix. Remove a third of the onion mixture and place the brisket in the onions in the pan. Cover with the remaining onions and bake, covered, in a preheated, 350-degree oven for about 3 hours or until the fork goes in and out easily. Remove and refrigerate overnight.

          The next day, pit the olives. Put them in a pot, cover with water and boil a minute or two. Drain the olives and cover again with water. Drain again. (This is done to remove some of the saltiness.)

          Take the brisket out of the refrigerator, remove any fat that has congealed, and slice against the grain. Return to the heavy pan with the reserved onion mixture. Add the olives and sprinkle over the sliced brisket. Add water (if necessary) and lemon. Reheat in a 350-degree oven for 45 -- 60 minutes and serve.

          Note: I like to slice the brisket the morning of the day I'll be serving it. When I lay the slices in the pan, I put some of the goodies like the onion and olives between each piece of meat to create small gaps. This lets the cooking liquid come in direct contact with more of each slice while it continues to refrigerate until the final heating in the evening. I think this adds flavor.