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I inaugurated my copper Mauviel saute pan...

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by cooking up some filet mignons in a wine reduction sauce.

First, I heated up some OO in the pan. It came to temperature very quickly, which is something, because all we have is a crappy electric cooktop. I sat back and whistled a happy tune for about 7 minutes, until the filets released themselves. Then I flipped them and waited some more.

I couldn't figure out how long to put them in the oven, so I just reduced the heat and finished them in the pan, turning them occasionally so they'd cook evenly.

When I was done, they were beautifully cooked, with no gray in the middle, and so tender you could eat them with a spoon. Or, almost.

My observations: quick heating, absolutely even heating, tasty fond, and easy clean-up.

I'd say it was the most superior pan I own, if not for the fact that every single one of our other pans are either yucky non-stick or totally warped from years on a gas stove.

I will be using this pan in my next kitchen, on a gas hob to supplement the induction cooktop I want. While not instantaneous, the time it took to come to and return to temperature was under 5 minutes. I can live with that.

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  1. That sounds lovely. What are the specs on your pan?

    What did you serve on the side?

    1. Congrats on the Cu pan!

      If you get a chance, check out the E.Dehillerin website. They'll ship to the US & it comes out cheaper than Mauviel for the 2.5 mm inox lined version.

      BTW, I've had my pots for almost 15 years & they're the best for what they do.

      They can't do what a Chinese sand pot or a cast iron pan or a Dutch oven can do, but they put to shame the other pots for sauteeing, cooking with liquid etc.

      Nice to have a pot you will never have to replace again.

      1. Good to hear. Congratulation.

        1. I couldn't figure out what you're doing with a copper pan when you were thinking about getting that AEG. Are you going to getting a combo unit then? ;-)

          1 Reply
          1. re: cutipie721

            They won't sell me the unit. Can you believe it. Something about it not being UL certified.

            So now I am waiting for Bosch, Neff, or Siemens to release their flexInduction, which is not limited by shape, size, or even the number of pans you can use at once.

            I'm looking for a reasonably priced single gas hob to supplement, because I like s'mores and also because power outages are not uncommon here. Plus, now I have this swanky copper pan.

          2. E_M:

            Hallelujah and Amen. Choir practice is every Thursday night from 7 to 9.

            But seriously, cooking on copper is such a joy (and such a relative bargain, all things considered) that everyone should experience it at least once. Ineffable, really, though Lord knows I try...

            Happy Cooking.

            5 Replies
            1. re: kaleokahu

              somewhat off topic but I just went crazy today and bought a Mauviel saute pan ( clad, not copper) as I am in Paris and the price was irresistible. I am sure it will be NO FUN trekking home with it, esp as I have a vist to Dehillerin planned this week but it's so beautiful I can't wait to get home and start cooking with it.

              1. re: knet

                Hi, knet:

                Congratulations. What line is your new Mauviel saute? M'Cook? Or Induc'Inox?

                Enjoy the rest of your trip, and remember my turbotier. If it won't fit in your suitcase, I'll take a Pommes Anna.

                Kaleo

                1. re: kaleokahu

                  It is m'cook. Dehillerin coming up. NOthing fits in my suitcase so I am debating shipping options!

                    1. re: knet

                      Careful packing it in your suitcase or bring it carry-on. Last time i came back with two sauce pots packed in the centre of my suitcase surrounded by layers upon layers of clothes. Somehow KLM still managed to dent one!

              2. What size did you buy?

                1. It's 9.5 inches wide with a brass handle. Upon closer inspection, I think the thickness might be closer to 1.5 mm. Oh, well, it's still the only flat bottomed pan I have an besides...it was only $10. Can't do better than that.

                  Sides were mashed potatoes and butter green beans. And wine. Lots of wine. I would have had more if I hadn't used half the bottle in the sauce.

                  4 Replies
                  1. re: E_M

                    E_M: Fantastic bargain! And it sounds like a wonderful meal.

                    I have but one criticism, along the lines of "...if I hadn't used half the bottle in the sauce." To wit, a *whole* bottle for the sauce--and another bottle for you. You owe it to yourself and loved ones to fully explore the French Paradox--red meat, red wine, duck fat, cheese. You can skip the Gauloises. :)

                    1. re: kaleokahu

                      I know, Kaleo, how you prefer the thicker copper. My thought is that since the time it took for the pan to come to temperature + recovery time = less than 5 minutes, I am OK. How would a thicker pan change this cooking experience?

                      1. re: E_M

                        As reported in another thread, I just returned from Paris with a 45 cm 22 1/2 qt Mauviel m'tradition saute pan that I picked up at Dehillerin. I'm thrilled!

                        Here it is next to a 7 1/2 qt Le Creuset Dutch Oven

                         
                        1. re: E_M

                          Hi, E_M:

                          How would extra thickness help? If you have *very* even hob heat, a pan that is perfectly sized for that hob, and you are only sauteing, maybe not a lot from a cooking standpoint.

                          But if you need even heat conducted out beyond the perimeter of the hob, if your hob delivers uneven heat to start with, and/or you want to cook something that fills the pan and makes even heat from the sidewalls desirable, then the thicker copper has a higher conductive capacity (think of it as a bigger hose).

                          It is actually a bit of a tradeoff because, as you have noted, the heat and recovery times (at least for the bottom of the saute pan) are going to be a little bit faster with thinner metal. Not so much with cooling full saucepans and other vessels, because of the thermal mass of their liquid contents is the big factor.

                          Enjoy your new pan for many, many years. I hope it brings you a lot of enjoyment and great food.

                          Kaleo