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Baked Fish Recipes?

a
alliels Mar 13, 2011 04:21 PM

I'm trying to cut down on calories and was wondering what baked fish recipes you guys would recommend. I'm getting tired of breading or just adding butter and basil to tilapia/flounder.

I do not eat shrimp but otherwise I'm open to other seafood options that are healthy and can be prepared easily.

Thanks

  1. operagirl Mar 13, 2011 04:38 PM

    I've posted my miso-glazed halibut recipe on CH before -- I think it definitely qualifies for your request. Works great on salmon too.

    Miso-Glazed Halibut for Two

    two 6-8 ounce halibut fillets

    1/4 C. light miso paste
    2 1/2 Tbsp. rice wine vinegar
    2 Tbsp. agave syrup
    2 Tbsp. canola oil
    1 Tbsp. soy sauce
    pinch cayenne pepper

    1/2 tsp. sesame seeds

    1 lime, cut into wedges
    pickled ginger

    1. Preheat oven or toaster oven to 450F.

    2. In a quart-sized ziplock bag, combine miso, vinegar, agave syrup, oil, soy sauce, and cayenne pepper. Smoosh the bag around to mix the ingredients together, then add the halibut fillets to the bag and let marinate for 20 minutes or so.

    3. Place the fillets on a foil-lined pan, then pour about half the marinade over the fillets. Discard the rest of the marinade in the bag. (To avoid wasting a plastic bag, you could do all of this in a mixing bowl. I just liked the convenience and lack of clean up!)

    4. Sprinkle the fillets with the sesame seeds, then bake for about 15 minutes, or until miso has turned a shade browner and sesame seeds are beginning to toast.

    5. Serve over rice, quinoa, or whatever you like. Garnish with lime wedges and pickled ginger.

    2 Replies
    1. re: operagirl
      a
      alliels Mar 13, 2011 06:00 PM

      Curiously I've never used miso. Is the miso glaze sweet? My only experience with asian glazes involve teriyaki or just soy sauce/honey.

      1. re: alliels
        operagirl Mar 13, 2011 07:20 PM

        It is salty/sweet, always a good combo in my book! Definitely worth a try if you've never made it before.

    2. BigSal Mar 13, 2011 04:39 PM

      Nina Simonds's Broiled Halibut With Miso Glaze. I discovered this recipe with last month's COTM. Delicious and simple to prepare. http://tinyurl.com/6dyl6k9

      1. L.Nightshade Mar 13, 2011 04:50 PM

        This is not baked, but an easy and healthy dish I found in the Essential New York Times Cookbook during February on COTM. It is fish steamed over a ratatouille and herbs. If this works, here is a link to the original publication in the NYT:

        http://dinersjournal.blogs.nytimes.co...

        1. chefathome Mar 13, 2011 05:13 PM

          Doing fish en papillote is wonderfully delicious and can be very healthy. Just add some fresh lemon or orange juice (heck, grapefruit or lime!) , veg cut small so they cook quickly (i.e. julienne), parboiled baby potatoes, fresh herbs, a touch of butter and season. Fun opening up at the table, too!

          1 Reply
          1. re: chefathome
            Emme Mar 19, 2011 08:58 PM

            love en papillote... anther great combo is mahi mahi or halibut, chopped tomatoes, diced onions, lemon juice, cilantro, and a dash of tequila if you're feeling splendiferous.

          2. v
            Val Mar 13, 2011 05:23 PM

            Dijon mustard is your friend...here's a pretty good recipe from Epiciurious...Fish Fillets Dijon...you can easily sub olive oil for the butter and I've used this on mahi-mahi and cod with great results:
            http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/foo...

            Alternatively: I've been using USA Frozen Sockeye Salmon spread with turmeric powder, fresh crushed garlic, black pepper, olive oil and white vinegar....let it sit for 30 minutes and then bake it at 375...very good and very good for you with the turmeric and black pepper. No bread crumbs but has lots of flavor IF you like turmeric.

            1. greygarious Mar 13, 2011 05:25 PM

              I use my toaster oven to bake 2-3 portions of tilapia or flounder. I usually do this on a bed of storebought Ritz cracker style seafood stuffing but if I'm being more virtuous, over plain cooked brown rice. Lay the fillets over the starch. Stir teriyaki sauce (I like Mr. Yoshida's Marinade and Cooking Sauce) into shredded or julienned vegetables. I typically use carrot, zucchini, yellow summer squash, scallions, and red bell pepper. Pour this over the fish and spread to cover. Baket at 375 about 20 min. Using the toaster oven, the proximity of the heating element creates a caramelized edge to the topping and stuffing/rice. A favorite meal.

              1. a
                amyamelia Mar 13, 2011 05:47 PM

                hi there
                one favorite way of mine to prepare any white fish fillet:
                thaw and sqeeze out water from 2-3 pkg of frozen spinach (or steam and drain equivalent amount of fresh spinach) spread out spinach on bottom of casserole dish large enough to hold single layer of 1 lb of fish fillets. sprinkle 4-16 oz grated sharp cheddar cheese over spinach (depending on how decadent you wish the fish to be) then layer fish on top of cheese. Dot fish with bits of butter or drizzle olive oil on top. Sprinkle with paprika for color. Bake, covereed with foil for about 20 mins, then uncover for 10 mins. serve with plenty of lemon slices and rice pilaf or couscous. Yummy, healthy, and easy!
                aa

                1. f
                  foreverhungry Mar 13, 2011 05:49 PM

                  If you've got a crowd, a whole fish (like a striped bass) baked in a salt crust is excellent. The flavor is fantastic, the fish is moist, and it makes for a heck of a presentation.

                  Otherwise, when it comes to fish, I usually try to do things simply, because the fish's flavor is delicate (with a few exceptions). Unless it's salmon, bluefish, mackeral, tuna, or something else that's strong flavored, I usually just rub some olive oil, simply season with S&P, and bake. If I'm feeling adventurous, maybe I'll make a fruit chutney type deal, using fine diced mango, a little shallot, maybe a shot of rum, maybe a little parsely or cilantro.

                  1. m
                    margib Mar 13, 2011 06:11 PM

                    We make this with many types of fish (salmon, halibut, cod, etc) and different seasonings. We like to add capers-and for a Greek flavor, top with feta. Easy, light and delish.

                    http://www.recipezaar.com/recipe/Roas...

                    1. JungMann Mar 14, 2011 09:28 AM

                      Make a spice paste with garlic, cilantro, lemon juice, olive oil, cumin, coriander, cayenne pepper, cinnamon and allspice. Rub onto your fillets. Bake on a bed of sliced onion and lemon. Serve with a sauce made from garlic olive oil, tahini, lemon juice, salt and a little bit of your spice mixture.

                      1. TwoTarts Mar 14, 2011 12:44 PM

                        Recipe #1 - Salmon with Lemon & Capers:
                        Take a salmon fillet and set it on a piece of parchment paper (big enough to fold over & roll up at the top, thus making a pouch of parchment for the salmon)
                        Drizzle the salmon with a little olive oil (you dont need much), some big shavings of lemon zest taken off with a vegetable peeler, some salt, and a little pile of capers.Bake at 350 for 20 minutes or so. So good!

                        Recipe #2 Salmon with Spicy Asian Mustard Glaze:
                        Make a glaze with equal amount squirts (about 2 Tbsp each):
                        Mustard
                        Brown Sugar
                        Soy Sauce
                        then add a generous dash of hot sauce.

                        Smear the glaze over the salmon, let sit for an hour if you have time & have planned ahead (but this is not critical) then broil for 10 minutes.

                        1. Bada Bing Mar 14, 2011 03:19 PM

                          Good thread idea. If you find them palatable, then I'd suggest you also consider sea scallops (dry pack), which can be seared and used in lots of ways.

                          And then also squid. If the legs are not your thing, you can do still something like marinate the bodies in a sweet soy mixture and then grill or broil them quickly. If you sear and lightly blacken the bodies, you can then cut them into rings for a very tasty and dramatic-looking dish (the dark outside contrasts with the white interiors).

                          Good scallops cost half what halibut costs around here, and squid is even cheaper.

                          1. Jay F Mar 14, 2011 04:27 PM

                            I roast some vegetables (onions, carrots, potatoes) with EVOO, s&p, and rosemary or thyme for about 25 minutes. About five or ten minutes before they're done, I take the roasting pan out of the oven and slide in a piece of salmon or snapper or whatever you want to eat, and which you've already prepped w/EVOO, S&P, etc. Cook it until the fish is done, under 10 minutes. Serve w/lemon wedges.

                            1. c
                              czyha Mar 18, 2011 09:24 AM

                              Quick and easy baked frozen fillets of white fish, e.g., tilapia, basa, for one with some leftover.

                              Slice a couple of shallots into the bottom of a glass loaf pan. Top with slices of lemon. I sometimes add chopped fresh dill, parsley or tarragon. Lay frozen or partially thawed fillet on top. I usually fold the skinny tail section over so the fillet is of more even thickness. Dot fillet with butter, salt, pepper and white wine, usually Sauvignon Blanc, sometimes Pinot Grigio. Cover with foil and bake in preheated 400F. oven for about 20 minutes. Serve with whatever you fancy.

                              The next day I stir the leftovers into cooked pasta and add a bit of cream. Serve topped with freshly grated Parmesan. Yum!

                              1. a
                                alliels Mar 19, 2011 03:52 PM

                                Question for you guys.... Would you use Teriyaki sauce on fish (I have a bottle laying around that I only use on chicken)? If you do, do you put the sauce right when you start baking the fish or close to the end of the baking time?

                                2 Replies
                                1. re: alliels
                                  f
                                  foreverhungry Mar 19, 2011 07:34 PM

                                  Personally, I would not use Teriyaki on fish. Fish has a delicate taste that simply can't handle heavy flavored sauces. I like the taste of fish, so tend to not bury it under heavy sauce. I use S&P, sometimes with lemon. Occasionally I've done fish Veracruzano style, or with a light leek sauce. Salmon I'll sometimes glaze. Tuna sometimes sesame oil. Bluefish always with an orange juice & soy sauce marinade. But that's usually it. Cod, halibut, catfish, turbot, etc. I tend to do fairly simply so I can taste the fish, and not just use the fish as a vehicle for sauce.

                                  1. re: alliels
                                    a
                                    Atochabsh Mar 20, 2011 12:56 PM

                                    The only fish I use teriyaki sauce on is Salmon. Baked or even better grilled, simply with some toasted sesame seeds. Just seems right.

                                  2. toodie jane Mar 19, 2011 06:29 PM

                                    whole fish ala Vera Cruz

                                    saute onions and chunks of garlic
                                    add chunked tomato (1 large can)
                                    season with S&P, oregano, bay leaf
                                    toss in some capers and
                                    chopped pimento stuffed green olives
                                    add a glug of good olive oil--simmer 15 minutes, low heat

                                    spread half of tomato sauce in a baking dish
                                    place whole cleaned fish (head intact if you can find one) over the sauce, then top with balance of sauce
                                    drizzle a couple tablespoons of olive oil over and bake at 350, flip the fish once, carefully.

                                    serve over or with rice

                                    the bones and skin really impart a wonderful rich flavor to the sauce. Leftovers are marvelous.

                                    1 Reply
                                    1. re: toodie jane
                                      4
                                      4Snisl Jun 12, 2011 05:22 AM

                                      Great recipe! Sometimes I'll throw in a handful of golden raisins if I feel like a sweet-salty sauce.....

                                    2. Emme Mar 19, 2011 09:04 PM

                                      Baked Salmon Croquettes

                                      1 can skinless, boneless salmon, drained
                                      1 onion, diced and cooked (can even nuke in micro)

                                      handful of chopped fresh parsley
                                      1-2 eggs
                                      almond meal
                                      salt and pepper

                                      mix in a bowl, with just enough almond meal so that the patties will hold together but are still pretty wet and seem like it might not be enough :) form into patties 1/2 - 3/4 in thick, or make as smaller bite-sized croutony things to go in salad or soup, and bake at 375 til golden and cooked through.

                                      1. i
                                        Ima Foodie Mar 23, 2011 01:45 PM

                                        I love the honey soy glazed salmon on Serious Eats - no added fat at all. Ina's mustard roasted fish is also super easy and good.

                                        1. limonay Jun 11, 2011 10:16 PM

                                          If you like Thai spices, then try baking the fish with some unsweetened coconut milk with lime zest+juice, chili flakes, coriander and garlic. I've tried this mixture with both whole red snapper and black sea bass. It's a versatile mixture that can work on a whole fish or drizzled over a fillet.

                                          http://fortychestnuts.com/

                                           
                                           
                                          1. mcel215 Jun 12, 2011 06:17 AM

                                            I bake my fish simply, patting dry, adding a little salt and pepper. Place in a baking dish, turn oven on to 375 degrees, preheat. Thinly slice onion or shallots, sliced fresh tomato and a sprinkling of olive oil. Place onion and tomato slices on top of fish and sprinkle with the olive oil. Bake for about 10-15 minutes, depending on the fish thickness.

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