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Vegetable slicer recommendations

e
E_M Mar 9, 2011 02:03 PM

Scalloped potatoes, cucumber salads, massive amounts of onions for soups...my knife skills just aren't there yet. Mandolins scare the crap out of me. (I know I am going to slice my fingers right off.) I saw somewhere a grinder type instrument that you turned and that sliced the veggies for you.

Anyway, does anyone have any slicing recommendations?

Thanks.

  1. m
    mateo21 Mar 9, 2011 05:28 PM

    Yar! Another BIG Benriner fan here. It's essentially a single bevel knife, very sharp, and very good at cutting... well everything including fingers! It's a snap to use and a mesh glove is a must have, I just picked up the Microplane one and it's fantastic fits well and doesn't get in the way of any dexterity (at least to use a mandoline). I find actually that I cut myself more often when sharpening the blade then when operating it *blush*...

    1 Reply
    1. re: mateo21
      paulj Mar 9, 2011 05:32 PM

      I've supplemented by Benriner with a food gripper from a simpler slicer that I bought from Daiso (the Japanese dime store found in some malls).

    2. Chemicalkinetics Mar 9, 2011 05:05 PM

      Hi E_M,

      In case you are going to get a mandolin and worry about getting cut, You may consider getting a pair of cut resistance gloves. For examples:

      http://www.amazon.com/BladeX5-Classic-Resistant-Gloves-Approved/dp/B003DZ02MU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1299722715&sr=8-1

      http://www.amazon.com/Microplane-34007-Cut-Resistant-Glove/dp/B001QXZORE/ref=sr_1_cc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1299722638&sr=1-1-catcorr

      http://www.amazon.com/Bud-K-Chainmail...

      1 Reply
      1. re: Chemicalkinetics
        Quine Mar 9, 2011 06:59 PM

        I do must *chortle* at one size fits all gloves like this. Having had to use one of these by mandate in a kitchen, I found massive amounts of duct tape was required to make that huge glove stay on my hand and not have floppy fingers as well.

        Just part of the glass ceiling small hand folks have to deal with.

      2. marthasway Mar 9, 2011 04:54 PM

        I use my non-dominant hand when using the mandoline so that I pay extra attention to the task at hand.

        1. h
          herring Mar 9, 2011 04:01 PM

          I assume the slicing disk on your food processor doesn't slice thin enough? I like this little kyocera slicer. Adjustable for three settings, and comes with a hand guard that's pretty easy to use. And if it turns out you're still nervous using it, it's not a big investment.

          http://www.google.com/products/catalo...

          Lots of people recommend using some sort of glove when using a mandolin; if you go that route you might want to do a search on what types people recommend.

          1 Reply
          1. re: herring
            b
            Breezychow Mar 9, 2011 04:26 PM

            Oh yes - I forgot to mention that! You can now get lightweight gloves that are almost like chain mail in that they can protect you from possible slip-ups.

            But I still think that being careful (no distractions!) & using the handguard is still good enough.

          2. b
            Breezychow Mar 9, 2011 02:19 PM

            Sorry - BIG mandoline fan here. In fact, my husband bought me a lovely fancy/expensive one for Xmas that I haven't even opened yet because I still use & am in love with the cheapo plastic-based one he bought me 14 years ago - lol!!

            There's no reason to fear them if you RESPECT them! USE the handguard & proceed slowly. People get hurt when they don't respect the machine, get cocky & don't use the handguard, & feel that they have to slice at the speed of light because "that's what they do on tv". You're not in a race, & you can proceed as slowly as you wish.

            Really - I honestly suggest you give one a try. Even slicing slowly you can do wonderful paper-thin onions that caramlize beautifully for soup, perfectly uniform cucumber for fabulous salads, & a mandoline simply CANNOT be beat for turning out potatoes for gratins that are pure poetry.

            If you're still nervous about taking the leap, see if you can try using a friend's or family member's for a bit before buying one yourself.

            And while I'm not personally fond of them, there are also the slicing blades for food processors & slicing attachments for Kitchen Aid mixers, assuming you already own the base machine.

            2 Replies
            1. re: Breezychow
              petek Mar 9, 2011 02:53 PM

              I love my Benriner Japanese mandolin.Picked mine up at the local Chinese restaurant supply store for $30.00 CAN.Small,easy to use and clean.Watch your fingers though,those blades are super sharp.

               
              1. re: petek
                Quine Mar 9, 2011 04:41 PM

                Definably agree on the Benriner Japanese mandolin. I've had mine well over 20 years works like new. My knife skills are excellent but I sure have cut myself WAY more times with a knife that this (only once) . It's very addictive, easy to whisk out, use even if just for a radish and super easy to clean.

                It does have a decent and usable slicing/hand guard. Folks who cut themselves tend to be ones like me who *have* to slice that last 1/8in left.
                Cheap enough to give a try, go for it, you will amaze your friends.

                http://www.amazon.com/Harold-Import-C...

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