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Nom Wah Tea Parlor – Surprisingly Good Dim Sum at One of Chinatown’s Oldest Restaurants

l
Lau Feb 26, 2011 12:28 PM

**For full post and pics**: http://www.lauhound.com/2011/02/nom-w...

Nom Wah is one of Chinatown’s oldest restaurants; in fact it may be the oldest restaurant in Chinatown as it opened in 1920 (91 years old!!). This was the first time I’ve eaten here as I’d always heard it was more of a nostalgia type of place and the food was just so so. I’m not much for nostalgia if the food isn’t good, but I recently read this article (http://articles.nydailynews.com/2011-...) that discusses how the nephew of the owner had taken over the restaurant and revamped it. A friend had also recently told me that the food is now good, so I decided it was time to try it out.

The décor is literally a throwback to a different time. It’s got old school red booths, red and white checkered table clothes, really old school looking counters and pictures on the wall from ages ago. It doesn’t look like a Chinatown place at all, but I liked the décor and it is nice and clean. It also happens to be on Doyers Street, which is one of the cooler looking streets in Chinatown. The service was very good and the owner was a nice guy. They do speak English very well here and it’s probably among the most English friendly places in Chinatown.

One thing that I really liked about the place is that everything is cooked to order as opposed to having carts. Very few good dim sum places in Hong Kong have carts anymore as the dim sum is just so much fresher when you cook to order. They also kept their menu pretty short, which I think is great because the downfall of so many restaurants in Chinatown is that they try to offer everything under the sun, which is something you rarely see in Asia, but for some reason is very prevalent in NY.

Here’s what we got:
- Tea: They’ve got an interesting tea list, we got the chrysanthemum tea and it was standard, but good.
- Parsley and Scallion Rice Roll: This was regular cheung fan (steamed Chinese rice crepe) with chopped parsley and scallions then covered in a lighter sweet soy sauce. The rice crepe was fresh and had good texture. The flavor of the parsley (tastes like cilantro, I think they’re basically the same thing) and scallion with the soy sauce were great. Overall, this was quite good. 7.5/10
- Steamed Pork Bun (Cha Siu Bao): There are four items on the menu that are circled in red and these are the house specialties. The cha siu bao is one of those specialties. The bun was excellent, very fluffy with a nice slightly sweet flavor, definitely among the best buns in Chinatown. The filling was pretty decent as it wasn’t too sweet and I don’t like the really sweet filling that is common among Chinatown places. However, the bun to filling ratio was way off as there was way too much bun and barely any filling. If they changed that this could be one of the better cha siu bao in the city. 7.25/10
- Shrimp and Snow Pea Dumplings: These were steamed dumplings with chopped shrimp and snow pea leaves. The skins were nice as they weren’t too thick, were freshly steamed and had good texture. The shrimp was very fresh and the snow pea leaves were a nice addition. Overall, these were surprisingly good. 7.5/10
- Stuffed Green Peppers: These were green bell peppers stuffed with a minced shrimp cake and covered in a black bean sauce. The shrimp cake was quite good, nice fresh minced shrimp. The green bell pepper was good, but the slight downfall of the dish was the black bean sauce while not gloppy was quite bland flavor-wise. I also prefer it in the spicy green peppers. Decent, but not amazing. 6.75/10
- Chinese Broccoli in Oyster Sauce: This was a very standard, but well prepared version of this dish. Simple boiled Chinese broccoli in oyster sauce, not much more to it than that. The vegetables were cooked well, so they retained their crunch without being over cooked. 7.5/10

Overall, I was pleasantly surprised at Nom Wah, it probably has some of the better dim sum in Chinatown right now and the environment is definitely very unique in Chinatown. I’d recommend checking it out.

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Nom Wah Tea Parlor
13 Doyers St, New York, NY 10013

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  1. scoopG RE: Lau Feb 26, 2011 12:43 PM

    Thanks Lau! I think they got a mention in the NY Times recently too which mentioned an upgrade. Another reason to visit Chinatown.

    1 Reply
    1. re: scoopG
      l
      Lau RE: scoopG Feb 26, 2011 02:03 PM

      yah it was a fun place, glad they upgraded it

    2. r
      rouxdauphine RE: Lau Feb 26, 2011 01:22 PM

      Thanks! BTW, how are they on MSG?

      1 Reply
      1. re: rouxdauphine
        l
        Lau RE: rouxdauphine Feb 26, 2011 02:04 PM

        i didn't notice it, MSG doesn't do much to me, so i'm not hyper sensitive to it, but i dont think they used alot here

      2. s
        small h RE: Lau Feb 26, 2011 02:05 PM

        That was the first place I ever had dim sum, probably around 1975. I don't know how I feel about the upgrade, but I'm glad the place has survived.

        5 Replies
        1. re: small h
          l
          Lau RE: small h Feb 26, 2011 02:07 PM

          well according the article they haven't changed anything decor wise and it is still the same family's ownership, but it seems that the food is what got an upgrade

          how was it back then?

          1. re: Lau
            s
            small h RE: Lau Feb 26, 2011 02:37 PM

            It was definitely a cart place back then. The clientele was mostly Chinese, but Jewish families like mine ate there as well. The waiters were about a thousand years old and wore black vests. The other Chinese restaurants I'd been to were in NJ and pretty Americanized, so I can't say if what I ate at Nom Wah's then was any good by my standards now (at the time, my favorite Chinese dishes were Shrimp Almond Ding and Wor Shu Op). But I remember various kinds of steamed dumplings, clams in black bean sauce, spare ribs, and sticky rice in lotus leaves.

            1. re: small h
              l
              Lau RE: small h Feb 26, 2011 04:21 PM

              ah sounds quite a bit different, the waitresses are all women and aren't that old and there are no carts. the clientele though definitely has a significant non-chinese population far more than most ctown restaurants although i guess its likely b/c of the media coverage as well as being very english friendly

              1. re: small h
                Windy RE: small h Jun 12, 2011 08:46 PM

                I also had dim sum at Nom Wah in 1981 or so with cousins who were regulars. It was the first time I'd ever had dim sum, and I remember being amazed when they tallied the bill by counting the plates. A curry puff was the defining bite, along with the famous almond cookies.

                1. re: Windy
                  l
                  Lau RE: Windy Jun 13, 2011 01:25 PM

                  you should try it out again, id be curious to how the dim sum stacks up to way back then

          2. d
            diprey11 RE: Lau Feb 26, 2011 03:55 PM

            Thanks Lau!
            What was interesting on their tea list? Do they offer good aged teas, as some HK establishments?

            1 Reply
            1. re: diprey11
              l
              Lau RE: diprey11 Feb 26, 2011 04:23 PM

              well actually if you go to my blog and look at the pics, i actually took pics of the tea menu so u can read to see what they offer

              most chinese places in NY tend to offer just hong cha (black tea) and occasionally will have something more like ju hua cha (chrysanthemum), so its just more that they offer alot more in the tea arena, i'd have to try them to see how they are

            2. Polecat RE: Lau Feb 26, 2011 08:15 PM

              "...everything is cooked to order as opposed to having carts"

              Wow. They've definitely changed. Have long stopped in here, at all times of day, weekends and weekdays, for the almond cookies, maybe a cup of tea. Loved the old school atmosphere and especially the tea tins lining the high shelves. Time definitely seems to slow down at this place, so, overall, I like it. Our few dim sum experiences, albeit several years ago by now, were, number one, of the cart variety and, number two, of the extremely greasy, almost stomach churning variety. I'm in Chinatown quite a bit, and never, ever see anyone in there either. That's not the sort of thing that bothers me - just makes me wonder how they survive.

              Thanks, as always, for your report.

              P.

              3 Replies
              1. re: Polecat
                l
                Lau RE: Polecat Feb 26, 2011 09:11 PM

                yah i've heard similar things about the old food at this place and i also never saw anyone in there either....seems like things have changed quite a bit, nothing was greasy at all actually

                btw i asked them if they have almond cookies and they said they are getting the equipment set up and they should have it in a couple weeks

                1. re: Lau
                  Polecat RE: Lau Feb 27, 2011 03:31 AM

                  The almond cookies and tea became their thing. Whenever I walked in, I'd see the cookies stacked in boxes, several of them. I figured all this time they did a brisk business selling a bunch of those to go, all while no one was looking. But anytime I read comments from other customers, it was almost always about the cookies. It's actually great that they've changed things up again. If the photo on your website pictures, say, 15 or so customers, that would be 15 customers more than I'd usually notice on a Saturday afternoon at 1pm. Looks like I'll be headed back for more than tea and cookies.

                  Nice work.
                  P.

                  1. re: Polecat
                    l
                    Lau RE: Polecat Feb 27, 2011 05:02 AM

                    actually the place was basically full the whole time i was there except when we first walked in and it was about half full....its very rare to see these types of places continue on let alone improve the quality of their food, so its certainly nice to see

              2. K K RE: Lau Feb 27, 2011 10:23 AM

                Nice writeup! I noticed that the steamers used are not the traditional bamboo kind. Is this the norm in Chinatown or other communities (e.g. Flushing) like in Southern California?

                1 Reply
                1. re: K K
                  l
                  Lau RE: K K Feb 27, 2011 12:24 PM

                  you mean the metal steamers? well u see them sometimes, actually sometimes the bamboo steamers are lined with metal, so basically the same thing, i think they're just around for aesthetics....i dont know if they make a difference, i think its unlikely it makes a difference flavor / texture wise

                2. Chandavkl RE: Lau Feb 27, 2011 03:39 PM

                  Thanks for the update. I would never have thought about going back. But you can get almond cookies anywhere--what I'm wondering about is whether they'll still have those big walnut cookies!

                  1 Reply
                  1. re: Chandavkl
                    l
                    Lau RE: Chandavkl Feb 27, 2011 04:14 PM

                    well i wouldve never gone if they hadn't changed mgmt and i hadn't heard the food had gotten good. they don't actually have the cookies yet, bu supposedly they are good. the almond cookies do have a walnut on them, so maybe you're talking about the same thing? (they are called almond cookies in chinese though)

                  2. asiansupper RE: Lau Mar 15, 2011 09:56 AM

                    Thanks to this review I went there for dim sum the other weekend. It was quite nice not have to jostle with crowds for a table (we were able to sit down immediately) and I liked almost everything we ordered. I never went to the old Nom Wah but I thought the old diner decor was cute.

                    Among the things we ate:

                    - Shrimp & Snow Pea Leaf Dumpling
                    - Bean Curd Skin w/ pork & oyster sauce
                    - Steamed Spare Ribs
                    - Turnip Cake
                    - Turnip Cake w/ xo sauce
                    - Chicken & Mushroom Rice Wrap

                    The only two things that we didn't like were:
                    - Shanghainese Style Soup Bun - not bad, just nothing special. Lacked flavor.
                    - Crispy Taro Turnover - this was actually not good. Cold and tasteless.

                    3 Replies
                    1. re: asiansupper
                      l
                      Lau RE: asiansupper Mar 15, 2011 10:43 AM

                      glad you enjoyed!

                      fyi, my advice to ordering in chinese restaurants is to avoid ordering dishes from other regional cuisines other than the region the restaurants specializes in. A lot of people expect the soup dumplings to be good at a dim sum place b/c its a chinese restaurant even though the dim sum place is specializing in food from guangdong not shanghai (very different cuisines). there are always exceptions, but i think its a general good rule of thumb

                      crispy taro turnover is a cantonese dish, so sounds like it was just not good

                      1. re: Lau
                        i8NYC RE: Lau Mar 15, 2011 11:38 AM

                        AVOID the fried stuff. stick to the steamed. I did a writeup as well but left indifferent.

                        1. re: Lau
                          asiansupper RE: Lau Mar 16, 2011 12:27 PM

                          thanks for the tip!

                      2. s
                        sugartoof RE: Lau Mar 16, 2011 01:12 PM

                        Either you're an excellent food photographer or those are some beautiful dim sum. Those aren't all dishes I would ever order for myself (I lean towards the fried, and buns) but I'm impressed with the freshness of the greens in those pictures.

                        Your rating points seem conservative though.... who is your first pick for dim sum?

                        7 Replies
                        1. re: sugartoof
                          l
                          Lau RE: sugartoof Mar 16, 2011 03:44 PM

                          haha sometimes my photos come out good, sometimes not....my gf also has a better camera than me, so usually when the pics look really good its her camera (and her taking the photo b/c she takes better photos than me)

                          re: my ratings - i try to rate places on an absolute basis not on a relative basis, which can be hard sometimes. So i rate things based on how i think they should taste, i wouldn't for example give a dish a high rating b/c it's "good for new york" etc. the problem with chinese food in NY is that alot of it is just okay (to down right bad) and the "best" places are merely good (not bashing NY by any means as NY is better than most of the US except LA and SF). So these are the ratings I think are about right (don't get me wrong btw i liked nom wah).

                          re: what would i rate "first" - In the city, i generally like dim sum go go the best, but nom wah and chinatown brasserie are contenders as well. In flushing, i prefer jade asian and guangdong. All this said, i think the dim sum scene is NY is somewhat weak. one of the things i liked about nom wah was the dim sum was cooked to order and therefore was quite fresh, this is uncommon in NY, but the norm in HK. I think few people in the US have actually had good dim sum (not their fault obviously). I think dim sum in HK vs NY is hugely different in terms of quality, so i think people's knowledge of what it should taste like is somewhat flawed (not to say that it still can't be tasty here).

                          Now look i totally understand that we're not in HK and i dont expect that level of quality ever, but i still do look at it on an absolute basis as i think thats the way to judge food. If you went to HK and tried alot of american food (a burger for example) you'd be like this is crap and im not going to say its good just b/c its better than the other crappy places, so i kind of think of it the same way (although i generally just don't review places i don't like unless they really turn out something awful as people are trying to make a living and i don't want to quash their livelihood)

                          1. re: Lau
                            s
                            sugartoof RE: Lau Mar 16, 2011 05:23 PM

                            Interesting read. I find the Chinese food in NY to be far superior to the West Coast though, but just not in the case of Dim Sum. I'm surprised Chinatown Brasserie ranks high for you. I guess their freshness helps. Most NY Dim Sum really tastes like it's been sitting too long.

                            1. re: sugartoof
                              l
                              Lau RE: sugartoof Mar 16, 2011 06:07 PM

                              where exactly have u eaten on the west coast? LA is sort of weird in that historic chinatown is not very good at all b/c most of the chinese people moved out a long time ago, so everything is in the san gabriel valley (SGV) which is not close at all to where most people stay in LA (west LA). To a lesser degree there is some quite good chinese food in orange county as well (but you have to know where to go)

                              SF is the same way although not to the same degree (there are still some chinese people living in their chinatown), but alot of their good restaurants like koi palace are in the suburbs although im less knowledgable about the SF scene than i am about LA (i'm from socal, so i know the LA scene pretty well)

                              1. re: sugartoof
                                Chandavkl RE: sugartoof Apr 13, 2011 08:42 AM

                                What? New York Chinese food is way behind the Los Angeles and San Francisco areas, as long as you stay out of the respective Chinatowns. Obviously there are Chinese restaurants in New York that are better than some Chinese restaurants in the LA and SF area. But as a group there is no comparison.

                                1. re: Chandavkl
                                  l
                                  Lau RE: Chandavkl Apr 13, 2011 08:50 AM

                                  agreed

                                  1. re: Chandavkl
                                    Windy RE: Chandavkl Jun 12, 2011 08:48 PM

                                    I couldn't agree more. I threw a Cantonese banquet for my mom in Flushing last year, after a lot of research, and while my family enjoyed it, I thought the food wasn't nearly as good as the Hong Kong style restaurants in the SF Bay Area.

                                    1. re: Windy
                                      l
                                      Lau RE: Windy Jun 13, 2011 01:24 PM

                                      yah unfortunately NY doesn't really have high end cantonese food that uses really good ingredients

                            2. scoopG RE: Lau Apr 13, 2011 06:55 AM

                              Featured in today's NYT, under $25 column:

                              http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/13/din...

                              3 Replies
                              1. re: scoopG
                                buttertart RE: scoopG Apr 13, 2011 09:00 AM

                                Good, they deserve to be better known. We had some very good steamed sumplings (the assortment), salt and pepper shrimp, and the gai lan in oyster sauce there recently. The old-timey thing (reminds me of the Jackson Café as was in SF) is fun too.

                                1. re: buttertart
                                  scoopG RE: buttertart Apr 13, 2011 02:25 PM

                                  I wished they would have shelled out a bit more dough to re-grout the floor!

                                  1. re: scoopG
                                    buttertart RE: scoopG Apr 13, 2011 06:17 PM

                                    Would have been a good idea, yes. I'm still thinking about the stuffed eggplant I saw on a table as we were leaving.

                              2. m
                                MahatmaKanejeeves RE: Lau Apr 13, 2011 02:59 PM

                                When I wanted to go to Nom Wah a few weeks ago, Doyers St. was closed for a camera crew. They were shooting inside Nam Wah. It wasn't possible to eat there after the shoot. Perhaps they will get some film or TV exposure.

                                1 Reply
                                1. re: MahatmaKanejeeves
                                  l
                                  Lau RE: MahatmaKanejeeves Apr 13, 2011 03:53 PM

                                  i think they're going to be on some relatively famous show, but i cant remember which one i think i read about it somewhere

                                2. Miss Needle RE: Lau Jun 12, 2011 07:28 PM

                                  Very cute decor. I think the dim sum is better at Dim Sum Go Go, but this was better than many other options in Chinatown. But one of my favorite dishes there is the turnip cake in XO sauce. A riff on home fries, the turnip cake is cut into cubes, seared til crisp on the outside, and stir-fried with XO sauce and green and red pepper. Must-order in my opinion.

                                  Bonus points for not having a huge wait. But that may change with all the press they've been receiving lately.

                                  4 Replies
                                  1. re: Miss Needle
                                    l
                                    Lau RE: Miss Needle Jun 12, 2011 07:40 PM

                                    glad you enjoyed!

                                    btw that turnip cake in XO sauce is an actual dim sum dish, but you don't see much modern dim sum in NY. i actually had it for the first time in LA at christmas, you can see it in my post about sea harbour in LA: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/758951

                                    i asked some HK friends and they said you can find this dish reasonably easily

                                    1. re: Lau
                                      Miss Needle RE: Lau Jun 12, 2011 08:08 PM

                                      Yeah, I've seen those turnip cakes on the West coast and they've looked like the ones on your blog -- scallions and bean sprouts or scallions only. I think the owner had a bit of a sense of whimsy when he concocted his version so they looked just like home fries -- except the XO turnip cakes taste better. And I love home fries. : )

                                      1. re: Miss Needle
                                        l
                                        Lau RE: Miss Needle Jun 13, 2011 12:29 PM

                                        haha both dishes are pretty genius inventions

                                        1. re: Lau
                                          m
                                          masterofceremonies RE: Lau Jun 13, 2011 06:12 PM

                                          love, love, love the turnips at Nom Wah, stuffed lotus leaf too.

                                  2. s
                                    small h RE: Lau Aug 24, 2011 05:11 PM

                                    I stopped into Nom Wah the other day for a late breakfast (or a very early lunch), right when they opened. I was the only customer for the duration of my visit, and I didn't feel especially welcome. I got my food in a timely fashion, but I had to chase down the lone server for tea and the check, although all she was doing was gabbing with some guy at the counter. I did get a nice greeting from Wilson Tang, at least, who was dealing with vendors.

                                    As to the food, I can't say I was overly impressed. I liked the dumplings with shrimp and snow pea leaf quite a lot; it had a very clean, fresh flavor. But the vegetable rice roll was a sticky, gluey mess. The filling had very little taste and reminded me of buddhist delight after a couple of days in the fridge. And the wrapper was a travesty. Dim Sum Go Go's rice rolls are far superior, in my opinion.

                                    That I couldn't enjoy my third dish was my own damn non-pork-eating fault. I got confused between the bean curd skin roll (which has pork) and the tofu skin roll (which has vegetables), and ordered the wrong one. So I pried the shrimp free from the pork and ate the bean curd skin, which wasn't bad. I would be most grateful if someone would explain the difference between bean curd and tofu to me, since I use the terms interchangeably and obviously Nom Wah does not. (Neither does South China Garden. They serve tofu with seafood and bean curd with seafood, and I love one and am lukewarm on the other - and I can't remember which is which.)

                                    7 Replies
                                    1. re: small h
                                      scoopG RE: small h Aug 24, 2011 06:03 PM

                                      I agree. I also question whether the food is really individually prepared. I went with a small group and we asked that items not all be brought out at the same time. That's exactly what they did. I wish the renovation job would have included re-grouting the tile floor.

                                      1. re: scoopG
                                        d
                                        diprey11 RE: scoopG Aug 24, 2011 06:10 PM

                                        Yeah, I agree. I think small H hit a batch carefully prepared well in advance for a group of a hundred starving tourists. Happened to us twice: well, this is a very thoughtful place. Nice decor, though.

                                        1. re: diprey11
                                          l
                                          Lau RE: diprey11 Aug 24, 2011 07:09 PM

                                          interesting, i didnt have the problem although i could see that happening...maybe re-try it when its more prime time. i think its on par with dim sum go go in general although the selection is more limited

                                          1. re: Lau
                                            MVNYC RE: Lau Aug 24, 2011 08:59 PM

                                            I went recently and enjoyed the food quite a bit but I don't think it equaled Go-Go. The Shrimp and Snow Pea Dumplings were excellent for the reasons described above. I had the Shrimp Rice Rolls and agree with small h that they were a bit too gluey. The Bacon and Shrimp Roll was very good though, Nicely fried with a very fresh shrimp taste and texture highlighted by the bacon. I liked the Char Siu Bao too which was freshly made and had a tasty filling. My only gripe was that I wish there had been more of that sweet porky goodness but I am picking hairs. All of our order took a while to come out and seemed to have been freshly made but I was there at 4:30 or so before the rush.

                                          2. re: diprey11
                                            s
                                            small h RE: diprey11 Aug 25, 2011 02:28 PM

                                            You may be correct, but I figured if I went first thing in the morning, I was bound to get freshly-made stuff - unless they prep the night before. I'd like to give them more credit than that.

                                            1. re: small h
                                              s
                                              sugartoof RE: small h Aug 25, 2011 02:48 PM

                                              Nobody is making 4 dumplings at a time. They're prepping batches and cooking them to order. The difference is if they're sitting in warmers all day long.

                                              1. re: sugartoof
                                                l
                                                Lau RE: sugartoof Aug 25, 2011 07:31 PM

                                                agreed when i went a few times it was all fresh to order, but you are right in that i bet it is made in batches and then steamed to order. however, its totally possible the initial batch is a big batch and therefore wouldnt be really made to order

                                      2. c
                                        citykid426 RE: Lau Aug 25, 2011 07:14 PM

                                        Lau I've been reading some of your posts on Chowhound and on Lauhaund and I have to say I absolutely love that you out ratings at the end of every dish description! Fabulous! I like knowing which dishes are seemingly better as compared to others (subjectively, of course). I wish all reviews, even in the newspapers, were like that.

                                        5 Replies
                                        1. re: citykid426
                                          l
                                          Lau RE: citykid426 Aug 25, 2011 07:32 PM

                                          haha thanks, i figured it'd be easier for people to figure out what dishes i really thought were good vs what i thought was just decent rather than a subjective description

                                          1. re: Lau
                                            s
                                            samjam101 RE: Lau Aug 30, 2011 01:31 PM

                                            Our parents used to take us to Nom Wah but we never ate there, only purchased boxes of delicious almond cookies. Years later, as an adult, I wonder if my parents avoided eating there because of the fast-paced mahjong tiles clacking nearby. Recently walked by and saw that it was still there and even asked my sister if it could have survived all these years just selling cookies? When she visits from Kansas next, we will definitely try it. I had lived in HK as an ex-pat and had an opportunity to try some incredible dim sum, both "local" and "high end"...so am looking forward to trying Nom Wah! Thank you, Lau! By any chance, has anyone tried the hand pulled noodles place located at 1 Doyers St?

                                            -----
                                            Tasty Hand-Pulled Noodles
                                            1 Doyers St, New York, NY 10013

                                            1. re: samjam101
                                              l
                                              Lau RE: samjam101 Aug 30, 2011 01:41 PM

                                              well i think the food has changed b/c as i wrote in the original post the food was supposed to be pretty bad prior to the new owner re-vamping it (well semi-new owner since still related).

                                              I believe they started selling the almond cookies again (they weren't selling them at the beginning)

                                              Also, if you're comparing this to HK then you'll be disappointed b/c NY does not have great dim sum even the "best" places in NY wouldn't even be average in HK. However, Nom Wah serves decent dim sum that is much better than alot of the other places in manhattan ctown which are serving garbage (i generally like dim sum go go and nom wah the best in manhattan ctown).

                                              i havent tried the one at 1 doyers since i usually go to super taste or lan zhou at 144 east bway, but i heard that one on doyers is pretty decent

                                              -----
                                              Super Taste
                                              26 Eldridge St, New York, NY 10002

                                              Lam Zhou Handmade Noodle
                                              144 E Broadway, New York, NY 10002

                                              1. re: Lau
                                                s
                                                sugartoof RE: Lau Aug 30, 2011 04:28 PM

                                                I did see photos from shortly after they opened where the cases appeared to be filled with the stacks of almond cookies. The difference being that it was the new brighter decor, and you could see they had customers. What did they have in the cases without the cookies? I've seen them empty, but only when the restaurant itself was empty.

                                                1. re: sugartoof
                                                  l
                                                  Lau RE: sugartoof Aug 30, 2011 09:24 PM

                                                  the owner told me they didn't actually have the machine to make them, but i believe they do now

                                        2. w
                                          Westminstress RE: Lau Mar 14, 2012 03:05 PM

                                          Had lunch here today and thought it was great! Loved the decor and was pleasantly surprised by the quality of the dim sum. My favorites were the shrimp and snow pea leaf dumplings, the turnip cakes (both kinds), also liked the salt and pepper shrimp and a vegetarian dish of fried dough in rice rolls. Scallion pancakes are to be avoided, however. We ordered chinese broccoli in oyster sauce but they never brought it out for some reason, though we saw it on lots of other tables and it looked good. We enjoyed the chrysanthemum tea as well, and thought it complemented the almond cookies nicely for dessert.

                                          -----
                                          Nom Wah Tea Parlor
                                          13 Doyers St, New York, NY 10013

                                          1 Reply
                                          1. re: Westminstress
                                            l
                                            Lau RE: Westminstress Mar 14, 2012 03:37 PM

                                            glad you enjoyed!

                                            i actually think they dim sum has gotten better, i ate here for the first time in a while recently and i think they actually may have taken mine (and others) recommendations into their food. im going to re-review it soon

                                            fyi, scallion pancakes aren't cantonese dish, so in general i wouldn't order them at a cantonese restaurant

                                          2. p
                                            Pan RE: Lau Mar 14, 2012 07:05 PM

                                            Thanks for the review! I just read through this thread. I remember playing with the owner's son at the restaurant when I was 4 in 1969. He was the same age as me. Like many New Yorkers, I had my first dim sum at Nom Wah, and I probably haven't been there since the 70s. I do look forward to going back. My girlfriend needs an experience of this historic interior.

                                            1. f
                                              foodwhisperer RE: Lau Jul 18, 2013 01:49 PM

                                              When it comes to Chinese restaurant reports I always rely on Lau for spot on info. However, on Nom Wah i can't totally agree. I haven't been to Nom Wah in ages . It used to be one of the only places in Chinatown to get a Cha Siu Bao, and those were the steamed ones.. The outside sign is still the original, the inside has changed somewhat but it still is a very nostalgic place.
                                              The service was excellent, the clientele was mostly Caucasian. We had Chinese speaking people at our table, so perhaps that helped our service.
                                              The fried turnip cake in XO sauce was my favorite dish. It was quite tasty, not greasy, and very fresh. I highly recommend that dish, but it is quite a large dish. The pieces are much thicker and softer than the typical grilled turnip cakes.
                                              The soup dumplings were terrible. Not fresh, most likely frozen and very thick skins. Not recommended, and maybe since Nom Wah is Cantonese, it was a bad ordering decision.
                                              The Shrimp and pea leave dumpling was good.
                                              The Salt and pepper spare rib, was really deep friend breaded pork chop. Thick breading , not wok fried. Unlike you would see in HK. A large portion and not recommended.
                                              The rest of the dim sum was OK, nothing special. My friends used a word in Chinese but I don't want to misquote or misspell the word , so basically it meant "common food". Nothing special.
                                              I recently was in queens at Lake Pavillion and found the dim sum way better there.

                                              19 Replies
                                              1. re: foodwhisperer
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                                                Lau RE: foodwhisperer Jul 18, 2013 03:04 PM

                                                interesting, i havent been in a while (probably 6-9 months), but the fried turnip cake in XO sauce is probably their best dish.

                                                i mean i can't vouch for the soup dumplings or salt and pepper ribs...i wouldnt order those things there

                                                what other dim sum did you order?

                                                1. re: Lau
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                                                  foodwhisperer RE: Lau Jul 18, 2013 04:43 PM

                                                  Ordered assorted dim sum ( accidentally), Lo may gai, fried shrimp wrapped in bean curd ( good dish), har gow, taro dumpling. Tried to get Congee ( Jo or Cho) haha don't know how to spell that. I want to try Triple 8 again, I hear it got good, i forget the actual name.

                                                  1. re: foodwhisperer
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                                                    Lau RE: foodwhisperer Jul 18, 2013 06:16 PM

                                                    juk is how is phonetically said in cantonese although i usually dont get it at dim sum places, find it usually kind of sub par

                                                    so im assuming you didnt like the lo mai gai, har gow and the taro dumpling?

                                                    1. re: Lau
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                                                      foodwhisperer RE: Lau Jul 19, 2013 04:27 PM

                                                      I've had good juk at dim sum places, but i'm curious as to where you would get it otherwise, unless you mean homemade. It's mostly a breakfast thing so I assume most restaurants don't have it. The Lo Mai gai was Ok not special, the had gow was fine, the shrimp quality was good. Unlike Jing Fong who uses inferior 'iodine" tasting shrimp, some of the thinner skinned dim sum was tough getting out of the tray without destroying them. The taro dumpling was thicker skinned and the filling was finely chopped, it was ok.
                                                      As far as juk I also like good Filipino arroz caldo or goto which is quite similar. The Juk at Lake Pavillion is pretty good.

                                                      1. re: foodwhisperer
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                                                        Lau RE: foodwhisperer Jul 19, 2013 09:51 PM

                                                        i usually get it places that specialize in it more, so in NY that tends to be BBQ places in chinese they usually say zhou mian fen fan or something like that in chinese on the outside which means congee noodle noodle rice. in HK they are a little more specialized than here, but its the same thing

                                                        cool, well it sounds like the duds were the non-dim sum dishes mainly although some of the dim sum was just whatever

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                                                          foodwhisperer RE: Lau Jul 20, 2013 08:56 PM

                                                          that is interesting that bbq places have the good congee. I've been going to bbq places for so many years, but always just get the pork or duck hacked up. I never even knew they have congee. I can't wait to try some. Thanks for the info.

                                                          1. re: foodwhisperer
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                                                            Lau RE: foodwhisperer Jul 21, 2013 03:40 AM

                                                            i usually get it at NY Noodletown or Hing Huang on Lafayette. i almost always get the pork and pidan (thousand year egg) although my GF prefers beef, also don't forget to add white pepper and maybe some chili oil. Also get a you tiao (fried crueller) to dip in it

                                                            1. re: Lau
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                                                              foodwhisperer RE: Lau Jul 21, 2013 10:33 PM

                                                              i'll try the you tiao. The white pepper I usually add, also scallions I like to add. the Pidan is usually in it already when I get it, but maybe at NY Noodletown i'll have to ask for it. I almost always get beef, but I'll try the pork. I'll report back.

                                                              1. re: foodwhisperer
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                                                                Lau RE: foodwhisperer Jul 22, 2013 06:47 AM

                                                                you can specify what you like to be in it, pork and pidan is my favorite, but beef is good as well (nice and silky). another one that i love, but i never get in NY bc i dont like the fish they use is fish congee (there are actually specialists of this in HK)

                                                                here's a specialist of fish congee back in CA that i go to (its very good): https://www.lauhound.com/2011/12/cant...

                                                                1. re: Lau
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                                                                  foodwhisperer RE: Lau Jul 22, 2013 09:26 PM

                                                                  I get too hungry when I check out your blog. I like fish congee but I don't think I've had a really good one like you had in Ca.
                                                                  Did you ever eat Filipino version of congee? i.e. arroz caldo or goto

                                                                  1. re: foodwhisperer
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                                                                    Lau RE: foodwhisperer Jul 22, 2013 11:16 PM

                                                                    haha thanks...if you ever happen to be in OC in CA you would love this place

                                                                    the fish should be very clean tasting (literally not even remotely fishy); ill find pics of this one really good spot in sheung wan in HK and post it back tomorrow when i have some time

                                                                    i have not tried the Filipino version although ive heard of it, i need to try more Filipino food...too many things to try and not enough time

                                                                    1. re: foodwhisperer
                                                                      Polecat RE: foodwhisperer Jul 23, 2013 02:55 PM

                                                                      Tried the Goto at Krystal's (Woodside) recently, with tripe. Thicker than Cantonese juk, with a side dish full of fried tofu squares immersed in a vinegary dark sauce. If you don't dig that sour, vinegar thing - I do - then this isn't for you. I liked the thickness of the porridge and the way the vinegar played off the savory and funk of the other flavors.
                                                                      P

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                                                                        Lau RE: Polecat Jul 23, 2013 05:57 PM

                                                                        cool sounds great

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                                                                          foodwhisperer RE: Polecat Jul 23, 2013 10:40 PM

                                                                          I haven't had goto at Krystal's but I'll try it. I tend to like it better than arroz caldo, which is made with chicken. Homemade versions tend to have more ginger than the restaurants put in.
                                                                          Thickness tends to vary with all of the porridges even the Cantonese juk is thicker in some places than others.
                                                                          Jeepney has "arroz caldo" but it really is goto, and a bit too thick.

                                                                        2. re: foodwhisperer
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                                                                          Lau RE: foodwhisperer Jul 24, 2013 04:28 AM

                                                                          here's the place im talking about in HK, they specialize in fish belly congee
                                                                          http://www.openrice.com/english/resta...

                                                                          1. re: Lau
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                                                                            foodwhisperer RE: Lau Jul 25, 2013 04:51 AM

                                                                            Wow, looks great

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                                                                              Lau RE: foodwhisperer Jul 25, 2013 06:57 AM

                                                                              yah its really nice although i will say that congee is one of NY's strong points, i think if u have a bowl of good congee here its not all that different than the standard bowl in HK, they don't have some of the stuff like great fish congee, but just your standard bowl at the better places like NY Noodletown is made pretty well here, XO kitchen has surprisingly good congee as well (and freshly fried you tiao!)

                                                                              1. re: Lau
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                                                                                fourunder RE: Lau Jul 25, 2013 07:06 AM

                                                                                Those are indeed nice appetizing pictures of Congee you have linked. They look like the consistency of the soup I get at Congee Village in the small earthenware pots.

                                                                                Admittedly, I have not had Congee at NY Noodletown is some time, but I always feel it's a little too thin....same with Big Wong(?) on Mott.

                                                                                1. re: fourunder
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                                                                                  Lau RE: fourunder Jul 25, 2013 07:19 AM

                                                                                  hmm i find it good consistency at first, but if u let sit around it starts to get thinner, so i always eat it straight away

                                                                                  Hing Huang on lafayette also does decent congee (they change their english name like every other day btw haha)
                                                                                  http://www.yelp.com/biz/hing-huang-ne...

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                                                      mrnyc RE: Lau Jul 28, 2013 02:43 PM

                                                      lau i see this is an old thread, but i am very surprised you had never eaten here before, at least randomly (although it is a nostalgia place). i miss the days when it was just me eating dim sum and a few older guys playing cards. my spouse likes it now but its too scrubbed clean for me. thats ok tho, im ok with it as it had to be done and the son i think who took over seems like a friendly and good guy. the food and tea offerings are pretty much the same thankfully. however, the egg rolls are a remarkable upgrade, its really the new signature order here. its in good hands to last another 100yrs i hope.

                                                      12 Replies
                                                      1. re: mrnyc
                                                        Chandavkl RE: mrnyc Jul 28, 2013 04:37 PM

                                                        With the continuous evolution of Chinese food, a good rule of thumb is that a Chinese restaurant that has been open more than 20 years probably should be avoided, or at least unless until you've tried everything newer. Consequently, nostalgia or curiosity aside, Chinese places open this long are usually not at the top of places to try.

                                                        1. re: mrnyc
                                                          scoopG RE: mrnyc Jul 28, 2013 05:17 PM

                                                          Scrubbed clean? Have you looked at the 90 year-old tile floor there recently?

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                                                            mrnyc RE: scoopG Jul 28, 2013 06:33 PM

                                                            ha were you in there before it was renovated?

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                                                            Lau RE: mrnyc Jul 28, 2013 05:19 PM

                                                            well i actually thought about it and i had eaten here once when i first moved to NY for college, but it was bad so i literally didn't eat here again for like 10 years...i dont care about nostalgia very much, so the fact that they upgraded the food is a major positive in my mind and i really don't like places that are built on reputations built a long time ago, but are not good now (i.e. veniero's etc). As you said this probably means the place will stay in business a lot longer than if they had been serving up bad food

                                                            1. re: Lau
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                                                              mrnyc RE: Lau Jul 28, 2013 06:45 PM

                                                              thats just it, outside of the terrific eggrolls i dont think the rest of the food is significantly better at all from the old days. i never found it to be good or bad, just ok. the tea choices, the turnip cakes, har gow, sui mai, tofu meatballs, greens and the other dumplings, desserts and other unabashedly standard dim sum items are all pretty much the same quality as i recall. i know because i made a point to go there like 3-4x/yr over 20yrs or so just because i found it so laid back and relaxing, a vibe it has definately lost now (although that is a fair tradeoff for it to continue to remain open). anyway it would not surprise me if some of the other same family members also continue to work there.

                                                              1. re: mrnyc
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                                                                sugartoof RE: mrnyc Jul 29, 2013 12:33 AM

                                                                What is it about the egg rolls that people are liking so much? They have to be in the top 5 greasiest items I've ever been served in NY.

                                                                1. re: sugartoof
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                                                                  mrnyc RE: sugartoof Jul 29, 2013 03:41 AM

                                                                  lol i know - i hate eggrolls. i never had them here in the old incarnation either. but thats how different and transporting these are in the new nom wah. someone knows their way around batter and a deep fryer. its promoted as the house specialty and definately get one here, they really are special.

                                                                  1. re: mrnyc
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                                                                    sugartoof RE: mrnyc Jul 29, 2013 11:39 PM

                                                                    I love egg rolls, and I'll eat my own shoe if it's fried, but I must have gone on a bad night, because the only thing really worthwhile was the nostalgia of the room. New York needs better dim sum.

                                                                    1. re: sugartoof
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                                                                      Lau RE: sugartoof Jul 30, 2013 06:37 AM

                                                                      well from my experience it improved alot and you're actually the only person who's told me it hasn't improved in a fairly drastically, maybe try it again and let me know? you ate the old place alot it sounds like so you have a better point of comparison than me

                                                                      it shouldn't make a difference, but I've also never eaten there at night (force of habit, i find dim sum at night bizarre since i grew up eating it in the morning as its traditionally eaten)

                                                                      1. re: Lau
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                                                                        foodwhisperer RE: Lau Jul 30, 2013 09:01 AM

                                                                        I'm with your force of habit or force of knowledge, dim sum is a morning/afternoon food, not something that is made fresh for the evening. I did make the mistake of going to DSGG at night, it was a big mistake. As far as Nom Wah, I ate there in the 60's, at that time they were only open for dim sum on Sunday morning and afternoon. It was one of the few places to have cha siu bao ( only the steam ones). They have added many dishes since the "old days". But again I was not overwhelmed by the dishes I had recently. I have to go back to 30 Pell formerly Hong Gung, and several names after that. They had the best dim sum years ago, I'm curious to see how good it is these days. Although it is under new ownership and management.

                                                                        1. re: Lau
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                                                                          sugartoof RE: Lau Jul 30, 2013 11:51 AM

                                                                          I think you meant to reply to mrnyc.

                                                                          I think the foods improved, but it's still not good quality dim sum. Even the steamed items are greasy.

                                                                        2. re: sugartoof
                                                                          Polecat RE: sugartoof Jul 30, 2013 08:06 AM

                                                                          Ate there a few times in the old days, and also in recent years following reports of improvement.

                                                                          The dim sum did improve. But it's also been inconsistent (never went @ night, only late morning/ trad dim sum times). So, while I've liked the egg roll a lot, I'm not surprised to hear that it's been overly greasy at times.

                                                                          P

                                                              2. p
                                                                Pan RE: Lau Aug 2, 2013 02:24 PM

                                                                I ate there several months ago and was impressed. Then I returned a few months later and had a decidedly mediocre meal with thick, sloppy wrappers and nothing-special taste. I haven't been back since then. Jade Asian in Flushing was much better, though in fairness I've been there only once so far (a couple of weeks ago).

                                                                1 Reply
                                                                1. re: Pan
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                                                                  Lau RE: Pan Aug 2, 2013 02:26 PM

                                                                  hmm maybe its possible its gone downhill? i havent been in quite a while, ill go back soon and see

                                                                2. foodmonk RE: Lau Nov 19, 2013 04:05 AM

                                                                  I hit Nom Wah over the weekend. I liked it. I can't say that the food was exceptional, but enjoyable. The steamed pork bun was really, really dough-y, but good. Steamed dumplings were fine. Rolls also fine, though a bit oily. The ambience is really quite nice, though. Staff was friendly and service was prompt.

                                                                  1 Reply
                                                                  1. re: foodmonk
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                                                                    Lau RE: foodmonk Nov 19, 2013 04:57 AM

                                                                    i need to go back, its been a while since ive gone back...it sounds like it mightve gone downhill a bit

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                                                                    chervil9 RE: Lau Nov 19, 2013 06:58 AM

                                                                    I think Nom Wah does certain things well and others badly. I always order the dumplings for which they make their own wrappers. Shrimp and snow pea, rice crepes, shrimp and chive. I tried the radish cakes and they were fried in old oil and served with nasty ground meat, inedible. I still love Nom Wah, the tea, dumplings and pleasant manager.

                                                                    2 Replies
                                                                    1. re: chervil9
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                                                                      Lau RE: chervil9 Nov 19, 2013 07:41 AM

                                                                      yah the owner guy is a really nice guy

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                                                                        sugartoof RE: chervil9 Nov 19, 2013 10:51 AM

                                                                        wrappers have a tendency to be pretty gummy and thick, with a starchy taste.

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                                                                        Simon RE: Lau May 30, 2014 02:21 PM

                                                                        Went there today, w/ someone from Guangdong...pretty awful food...thick-skinned hargow w/ gummy filling...ultra-greasy shrimp/snow-pea-leave fried dumpling w/ barely any shrimp...open shrimp dumplings bad too...eggplant w/ fish paste and the rice crepe w/ shrimp were edible but that's the best i can say...my Guangdong friend found it all very poor (substantially worse than even the so-so dimsum at 88 Palace)...will not be back...

                                                                        29 Replies
                                                                        1. re: Simon
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                                                                          Lau RE: Simon May 30, 2014 02:24 PM

                                                                          i havent been in a long time (maybe 2+ years) and there have been a lot of reports of pretty bad food, so its very possible that the restaurant has gone downhill, which tends to be pretty common in chinatown unfortunately

                                                                          1. re: Lau
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                                                                            fourunder RE: Lau May 30, 2014 02:31 PM

                                                                            it's all your fault with this original post....they got too busy and quality suffered.....

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                                                                              Lau RE: fourunder May 31, 2014 07:14 AM

                                                                              haha thx

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                                                                            tex.s.toast RE: Simon May 30, 2014 08:33 PM

                                                                            had a relatively recent weekday lunch here and felt like it was pretty mixed - the good things were mainly those praised in Lau's original post - i liked the steamed pork buns (large, great bun, good filling, and i did not think they were remotely stingy with the filling to bun ratio), rice noodle roll, and the shrimp and snow pea dumpling. can't particularly recommend the fried or pan-fried items but i distinctly remember thinking to myself as we left that id return again for only the three items we enjoyed most.

                                                                            would i make a special trip or wait in line for it? no probably not, though i do appreciate the english-friendly service and distinctive decor.

                                                                            youre definitely paying for the service and atmosphere (and, i suppose, the fact that they are cooking to order instead of letting things sit on carts), with the large char siu bao going for $1.95 and the other dumplings considerably higher priced than other chinatown dim sum spots.

                                                                            1. re: tex.s.toast
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                                                                              Lau RE: tex.s.toast May 31, 2014 07:15 AM

                                                                              ah ok well glad you had a decent experience

                                                                              this is kind of sad but ive become so disenchanted with dim sum in NY that I literally never go, maybe Hakkasan every now and then. I don't think I've had dim sum in almost 6 months (the last time I was at home in CA)

                                                                              1. re: Lau
                                                                                Chandavkl RE: Lau May 31, 2014 07:10 PM

                                                                                Interesting article by the owner of Nom Wah. If his top picks are Yee Li, Ping's, and Sing Kee, this supports the naysayers more than his rebuttal.

                                                                                http://www.thelodownny.com/leslog/201...

                                                                                I would say that Golden Unicorn's dim sum is comparable to second tier L.A. area (cart) places like Ocean Star and NBC, so if I lived in NY I'd hit it up once in a while.

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                                                                                  Simon RE: Chandavkl May 31, 2014 07:38 PM

                                                                                  yep, and despite his cautions about OTHER places, my friend ordered for us in Cantonese at his place and the food was still awful :)

                                                                                  1. re: Chandavkl
                                                                                    ipsedixit RE: Chandavkl May 31, 2014 07:49 PM

                                                                                    That's quite a list of top picks.

                                                                                    It's a bit like saying the best Italian in Manhattan are Carmine's, Tony's, and Olive Garden ...

                                                                                    1. re: ipsedixit
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                                                                                      Lau RE: ipsedixit Jun 1, 2014 05:39 AM

                                                                                      some enterprising entrepreneur should open a good dim sum places in the northern part of chinatown / southern part of chinatown, charge high prices, but have actual good dim sum in a nice setting. i bet that would do well

                                                                                      1. re: Lau
                                                                                        ipsedixit RE: Lau Jun 1, 2014 10:50 AM

                                                                                        People have looked into it and the demographics just would not support it.

                                                                                        Maybe when all those 20-something's paying $5 for boba at all those Taiwanese joints sprouting in/around Chinatown (and now Midtown), get high paying jobs, marry, have kids, then maybe.

                                                                                        But, alas, by then they'll all probably move to the other Boroughs like Brooklyn or Queens (Flushing).

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                                                                                          Lau RE: ipsedixit Jun 1, 2014 06:09 PM

                                                                                          haha your demographic would be me, i live in the area and would pay high prices for good dim sum...i think its become mainstream enough where non-asian people would go (i.e. momofuku pork buns), but ive never owned a restaurant so who knows

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                                                                                            Pookipichu RE: Lau Jun 1, 2014 07:30 PM

                                                                                            Places like momofuku noodle are such a ripoff but manage to be extremely popular due to stellar marketing and hitting the right tone, I think there's viability for expensive dim sum if marketed properly. Redfarm is packed and expensive, and a good example of competent marketing although not quite as skilled as David Chang's team.

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                                                                                              Lau RE: Pookipichu Jun 2, 2014 05:39 AM

                                                                                              red farm is what i was thinking of actually

                                                                                              most of my friends (who are not even remotely foodie-esk) love all dumplings, buns etc and they would love something like this as they love pretty poorly made dumplings, buns etc. if they had something good im sure it would blow them away

                                                                                              1. re: Lau
                                                                                                ipsedixit RE: Lau Jun 2, 2014 10:39 AM

                                                                                                I don't know if I am more saddened or shocked that RedFarm is the standard to which NYC dim sum aspires to be.

                                                                                                When I think of "good dim sum in a nice setting" there were images of Sea Harbour or Elite (LA), Koi Palace (SF), Fisherman's Terrace (Vancouver) or Casa-Victoria (Ontario) flashing through my head.

                                                                                                The last thing that would've occurred to me was fancified fusion dim sum that someplace like Buddakan puts out.

                                                                                                1. re: ipsedixit
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                                                                                                  Lau RE: ipsedixit Jun 2, 2014 11:02 AM

                                                                                                  you're misinterpreting what i said completely.

                                                                                                  My actual point is that if a place of redfarm's quality can prosper, why can't a place that serves good dim sum?

                                                                                                  also, when i said "nice setting" that's not what im meant either. if you're going to have a place in say northern ctown / soho hoping to attract the non-chinese clientele then you're probably going to need to be a little more trendy that than although this is sort of a side note

                                                                                                  buddakan is not what im talking about bc thats really the over the top meat packing thing that is really more of a scene

                                                                                                  1. re: Lau
                                                                                                    ipsedixit RE: Lau Jun 2, 2014 11:12 AM

                                                                                                    Do you think a place like RedFarm prospers b/c of it's dim sum offerings? Granted, I've only been to RF a couple of times (and not the new UWS location), but the times I've been the dim sum has been more of a "side dish" to the entrees that people were ordering. It's sort of the same deal at place like Hakkasan or Buddakan.

                                                                                                    Those places aren't really doing dim sum service at one particular meal (be it lunch, or some other time) as the only menu items.

                                                                                                    Would a place like that thrive? In other words, if RF only offered dim sum items for lunch, would it still be packed? I dunno.

                                                                                                    But I think we've digressed too far. Let's just say that I'll save my dim sum NYC dollars for Hakkasan, and the rest of my NYC dollars for other cuisines. :-)

                                                                                                    1. re: ipsedixit
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                                                                                                      Lau RE: ipsedixit Jun 2, 2014 11:17 AM

                                                                                                      that works for you bc you dont live here...i havent eaten dim sum in 6 months, so this is not working for me! haha

                                                                                                      1. re: Lau
                                                                                                        ipsedixit RE: Lau Jun 2, 2014 11:22 AM

                                                                                                        Suck it up and take the 7 to Asian Jewels in Flushing and have at it!

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                                                                                                          Lau RE: ipsedixit Jun 2, 2014 11:27 AM

                                                                                                          asian jewels is not that good, in fact i find it pretty bad...if it was just a matter of me trekking to flushing i'd be good

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                                                                                                            Pan RE: Lau Jun 13, 2014 01:31 AM

                                                                                                            Nothing good in Flushing or Brooklyn?

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                                                                                                              Lau RE: Pan Jun 13, 2014 05:49 AM

                                                                                                              flushing is better than manhattan, but still ive been a bit disappointed there too recently...like jade asian is alright, not bad, but not great by any means

                                                                                                              1. re: Lau
                                                                                                                Peter Cuce RE: Lau Jun 13, 2014 06:39 AM

                                                                                                                I agree about dim sum. Have you been to Grand?Better than average sometimes. Fresh durian puffs are some of the best in NYC.

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                                                                                                                  Lau RE: Peter Cuce Jun 13, 2014 08:13 AM

                                                                                                                  i have not, i heard sort of mixed things about it although i should try for myself

                                                                                                                  1. re: Lau
                                                                                                                    Chandavkl RE: Lau Jun 13, 2014 09:05 AM

                                                                                                                    Like all the big Cantonese places in Flushing it's OK, and clearly better than Manhattan Chinatown. But none of them would be destinations if you're looking for San Gabriel Valley quality stuff.

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                                                                                                        Pookipichu RE: ipsedixit Jun 2, 2014 11:18 AM

                                                                                                        The main dishes at RedFarm are awful, if that's why people are going there then, that's just a shame.

                                                                                                        You should try Decoy, the food is actually better than the sister restaurant.

                                                                                                    2. re: ipsedixit
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                                                                                                      Pookipichu RE: ipsedixit Jun 2, 2014 11:38 AM

                                                                                                      I personally don't mind "fusion", food is always evolving so much, every time I go to Shanghai, Taipei and Hong Kong, etc., that as long as the change makes sense, adds some value to the dish, I'm for it. Cream cheese in dim sum, not so much.

                                                                                                      If it sticks, eventually it won't be fusion. Tomatoes are non-native to Italy and were only popularized in the late 1700's, now they're practically synonymous with Italian cuisine. :)

                                                                                                2. re: Lau
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                                                                                                  Shirang RE: Lau Jun 2, 2014 06:41 AM

                                                                                                  I'm in that demographic too, I used to goto Chinatown Brasserie often because of the quality and could also bring my dog to the patio.

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                                                                                                    Pookipichu RE: Shirang Jun 2, 2014 07:10 AM

                                                                                                    There are fans of Chinese food who are willing to pay a premium for higher quality. I think the failing of restauranteurs attempting to bring higher priced Chinese food to the NY market is multifold.

                                                                                                    They try to be everything to everyone as opposed to being focused. For example, Le Bernadin or Marea have a focus on seafood while offering a more limited selection of alternative items. Keeping the menu tight and focused. Teach people not to expect every Chinese dish they've ever encountered, on one menu, same way I wouldn't automatically expect pizza at Marea.

                                                                                                    Hitting the right notes with the menu. E.g. seasonality, that's a buzz word right now. The trick to many successful restaurants in NYC seems to be that they pander to the egos of well-heeled people in non-obvious ways that suggest "you are so smart, you chose to eat here because you have excellent taste and are so wise". Memes change (foams, foie gras, smears, molten chocolate cake) but tasting menus and seasonality are consistently popular.

                                                                                                    Marketing.... Redfarm and Mission Chinese have been excellent in this respect, but I've yet to see a "high end" Chinese restaurant with a marketing team that is on point. Shang was a mess, Hakkasan's marketing and market study of NYC was abysmal, etc.

                                                                                                    1. re: Pookipichu
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                                                                                                      sugartoof RE: Pookipichu Jun 2, 2014 12:40 PM

                                                                                                      Why does it need to be high end or with some brand marketing nonsense?

                                                                                                      NY currently lacks good, fresh, dim sum on at any price point, but the idea that it can only be done as a premium product. How about we simply stop championing bad dim sum like what Nom Wah has been selling for a long time now. They're capable of making better dim sum if they want to, but they have no incentive to when they can serve crap, and win raves for it. The chefs aren't trained for it, and they're serving to people who either don't care, give them a pass, or don't know better. If someone made real dim sum, with good ingredients, sold fresh, they could open a walk up window, and would sell out of most items like they do in other cities.

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