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Me and my 11 yr old have a blast at Little Q

t
three of us Feb 23, 2011 11:55 AM

School break means lunch together for my son and me. This time it was at Little Q Hot Pot in East Arlington and what a great time we had!

Neither of us knew the protocol and our waiter was terrific in showing us how to cook our meats, noodles and veggies. I got steak with cellophane noodles, my son got shrimp with udon. Lunch special hot pot veggies were a mushroom, chunk of corn on the cob, piece of tofu, lots of spinach leaves, and scads of cilantro. We got the mongolian vegetable broth.

What fun for us to learn something new and enjoy fresh, delicious food. The broth was so fragrant and beautiful, I wanted to lean over it with my coat over my head and just inhale the goodness.

I love that my son is game for new things. His chopstick technique gets better and better and we just laughed when our ladles fell in the broth or broth slurped all over our chin as we tried to dig out the noodles in our cups. Good times.

Lunch for the two of us plus two mango juices and a pot of tea came to $26.00. A bargain for the quality of food, waitstaff, and company.

  1. StriperGuy Feb 23, 2011 12:36 PM

    Most excellent!

    1. Boston_Otter Feb 24, 2011 08:06 AM

      Most of the 11-year olds I know have a hard time thinking beyond chicken fingers and pizza bagels -- it makes me most happy that your son's getting a taste for exploring food and trying new things at that age. Congratulations!

      8 Replies
      1. re: Boston_Otter
        StriperGuy Feb 24, 2011 08:38 AM

        You just gotta get the chow pups going at an early age.

        I've got a half brother who was trolling NYC Chinatown with my pop as a 10 year old...

        1. re: StriperGuy
          Boston_Otter Feb 24, 2011 11:13 AM

          I grew up in small-town Ohio; the closest thing to Asian food we had was La Choy in a can. Mexican? Taco Bell. Italian? Boyardee. But the first time I saw frog legs and scallops on a menu, age 10 or so, I jumped at the chance to try it, because my parents never made it seem weird or strange and pointed out all the unusual things on menus for me to try. Now I'm a foodie, so thanks, mom & dad.

          1. re: Boston_Otter
            Johnresa Feb 25, 2011 10:52 AM

            What does the Mongolian broth taste like? I have only tried the spicy, the miso, and the black bone chicken at Little Q.

            Boston_Otter-- You make me wish there was a Facebook like button for your post :-)

            1. re: Johnresa
              s
              Spike Feb 25, 2011 10:59 AM

              The Mongolian has pretty complex flavors because it has a lot of interesting spices in it. My favs are the Mongolian and the spicy broths. Both have complex flavors in different ways...

              1. re: Spike
                C. Hamster Feb 25, 2011 12:57 PM

                We had the spicy broth at Q chinatown and they way overdid it on the herbs/spices/root/bark, particularly camphor root. It was not nearly as good as we had remembered in Quincy.

                We tried the tom yum and kimchi on Monday and both were very good (though the kimchi one didn't taste anything like kimchi).

                I take it the mongolian broth has all the "stuff" in it, too?

                1. re: C. Hamster
                  t
                  three of us Feb 25, 2011 02:50 PM

                  The mongolian broth had herbs, barks, berries, and maybe a root or two. It was sublime! Not overdone at all. I found everything to blend beautifully. Nothing over seasoned or dominating in taste.

                  I used to see a chinese herbalist who would take a little of this, a little of that and give me a bag of herbs, barks, etc. with which to make a tea. This is what the broth reminded me of, except it tasted millions better.

              2. re: Johnresa
                t
                three of us Feb 25, 2011 12:42 PM

                The mongolian broth is sublime and to call it complex is a great description. It is definitely not spicy. Full-bodied, fragrant, fascinating, textured . . . the goodness just seems to call out to a genetic imprint of what constitutes a savory broth.

                If you are into shapes, colors, and textures of foods, you will enjoy looking at the many herbs, roots, and barks simmering in the broth.

                1. re: three of us
                  t
                  three of us Feb 25, 2011 05:23 PM

                  Uh, sorry for the overpost. I posted one entry long before the other and it didn't come up on this link so I did another reply.

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