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Two nights in Plymouth--where to eat?

We (three food lovers and the Pickiest Eater in the World) are staying at the John Carver Inn for a little break tomorrow thru Wednesday (2/23). Where can we eat? The Pickiest Eater has a peanut/tree nut allergy so Thai is out, but he loves Japanese (tamago maki and shumai only, of course). No one wants to drive very far, since this is really just a mental health break. Everyone eats seafood (Pickiest Eater's must be fried). We all enjoy Italian and French as well.

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  1. My favorite by far is the Blue-Eyed Crab. Nice fresh seafood, creatively prepared. They incorporate lots of tropical flavors instead of just doing standard New England fried or breaded/baked preparations.

      1. re: smtucker

        Some of the restaurants in those links have since closed or are seasonal. I agree on the Blue Eyed Crab rec. Simple place with little atmosphere but priced accordingly and good food. New Tokyo is a Hibachi place that is fun but the food is meh. Sushi Joy has decent sushi and Asian entrees. Patrizia's is a fairly new Italian place that is tiny. The food is decent enough to recommend, but tiny. East Bay Grill is a very large restaurant on the waterfront with standard American fare. Reliable steaks and seafood, a little pricy for the quality but lively atmosphere and very large bar. Solstice in Kingston is a 10 minute drive and is really the only choice for higher end food. The Waterfront Grill is fairly new and has a youngish vibe. Always has live music (twenty something stuff usually) but a good view and standard pub grub. Persey's for breakfast is decent and Kiskadee for coffee. The original British Beer Company is in Plymouth center and is a pretty cool rendition of a little English pub, beer only, no food to speak of.

        1. re: T.Clark

          I haven't been to Plymouth in quite awhile. Is the Run of the Mill Tavern still open?

          1. re: Pegmeister

            Still open Pegmeister, tho it has changed hands a few times in recent years. The bar can be a bit too local sometimes. I think pub grub is their forte and they serve huge glasses of white zin. Not a bad spot in the summer out on their deck overlooking the Jenny Grist Mill and Nelson Park. I think they have an Irish Trio on Saturday nights, at least they did over the summer.

            1. re: T.Clark

              Thanks for the response. I always liked that deck by the Grist Mill and the people that owned the place when I was there last, were quite accomodating. I do recall many locals at the bar, but they were quite social as well. One of the best dishes I had there was some seared scallops on top of a Southwestern rice that had quite a bite.

          2. re: T.Clark

            I find Sushi Joy lacking in quality but maybe I'm just spoiled from the several terrific choices over the bridge on the Cape. Solstice is the clear winner in the area.

            1. re: CapeCodGuy

              I'm with you on Sushi Joy and have used the Southern New England board recs for cape cod sushi with great results. Given the OP's desire to stay local with a Japanese option I thought Sushi Joy would be a marginally serviceable option. That said I'd take Solstice's tuna nachos any day over their stuff. I'm on the cape a lot CapeCodGuy and have found your suggestions and posts quite valuable so thanks!

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              Sushi Joy
              124 Colony Place Rd, Plymouth, MA 02360

            2. re: T.Clark

              Kiskadee has excellent coffee. That's where I got my afternoon fix and we're going there for bagels and coffee tomorrow morning.

              1. re: Isolda

                where is Kiskadee? I'm in that area occasionally (Kingston), but never found great coffee....would love to know where it is.

                1. re: qianning

                  Technically it's at 18 Main St. But Main St. is just an extension of Court St which is also rt.3A. Unfortunately it's not convient to park anywhere near there unless you luck out with street parking. It's more conducive to walking. Also it's not exactly close to Kingston. Off season it's much easier to get to but once the tourists show up it's not really worth the effort.

                  1. re: T.Clark

                    thanks for the response. Actually I often get to downtown plymouth on my trips to Kingston....but have yet to find good coffee in Plymouth....is Kiskadee new? Or is it the one near/in the block/building with Pilgrims Progress? Drawing a blank on that name & my memory of cafes/coffee shops on 3A/Main/Court St.

                    1. re: qianning

                      Fairly new.Maybe a couple years old. It's on the same block as the old M&M sporting goods.

          3. I agree w/ TClark, Solstice would be my choice. Best dining in the area by a long shot. Great food, wine and service.
            Enjoy,
            CocoDan

            1. Thanks, everyone. We will try to get a res at Solstice tonight. I am sure it will be better than the too-sweet pastry breakfast we got from Blue Blinds bakery this morning!

              2 Replies
              1. re: Isolda

                Blue Blinds is a bakery owned by the religious group (some say cult?) known as The 12 Tribes. They also own Common Ground around the corner on Court St. The group has been the subject of curiosity and controversy to Plymouth locals since 2000 when they set up their community.

                1. re: T.Clark

                  My husband went to pick up the pastries and said he was served by "moonies," so I figured it was something like that. He said they were very nice. They just can't make pastries. Everything was greasy and had double the sugar you'd expect. We didn't get high from eating them, so sugar must be their drug of choice.

              2. Okay, we're back from Plymouth and have concluded that it is a town best known for its pilgrims. We loved Solstice, but that is actually in Kingston. We also enjoyed the bagels (very good, properly boiled and baked) and coffee (outstanding, worth buying a bag of their house-roasted beans) at Kiskadee. We wanted to try Guru (Indian) because we were told it was good, but it was closed the two nights we were there. Here is a list of places to avoid:
                Hearth and Kettle (French toast with "seasonal fruit" meant canned pie filling)
                Run of the Mill (very ambitiously named--they should hope to be so average--all our salads would make the CHOW hall of shame)
                Sam Diegos (New England-Mex--that says it all--son wanted to try it anyway)
                Blue Blinds Bakery (way too sweet and oily pastries, indifferent coffee)

                Next time, we'll try some of the seafood places you guys recommended.

                12 Replies
                1. re: Isolda

                  Sorry to hear that our knowlege is confirmed. Plymouth proper is a culinary wasteland. Glad you got to Solstice.

                  1. re: CapeCodGuy

                    I think it's safe to say Plymouth is a culinary black hole. Unsupportive locals and a bargain seeking tourist demographic just doesn't support fine dining restaurants. I see people recommend Issac's and that pretty much sums up the situation.

                    Isolda, I hope you still got the R&R you were seeking despite the poor food offerings. Somehow the summer crowds make it slightly more palatable. You didn't miss much at the Guru, which transforms into a nightclub after 9. Very odd actually.

                    I'm glad you liked two of my recs in Solstice (my local go to spot) and Kisskadee.

                    1. re: CapeCodGuy

                      A wasteland?

                      Sheesh, I wish my town had a Chez Ducrot or Martha's Stone Soup...

                      -----
                      Chez Ducrot
                      40 Russell Street, Plymouth, MA 02360

                      Martha's Stone Soup - CLOSED
                      517 Old Sandwich Rd, Plymouth, MA 02360

                      1. re: okra

                        Chez Ducrut is not a restaurant and Martha's is out of business.

                        1. re: T.Clark

                          "not a restaurant"
                          but
                          a place where $$ is exchanged for a chow-worthy meal, no? Shame about Martha's, I enjoyed it there...

                          1. re: okra

                            Wasteland it is. I would not be comfortable paying $$ to have a meal in someone's home, so no, that doesn't count.

                            1. re: CapeCodGuy

                              $$$ to be more accurate. Chez D is open 2 nights a week and sporadicly at that. I have not tried it but I understand it's very good. But I'm with CCG in that it's not something I'm interested in. A bit too B&B for my taste.

                              1. re: T.Clark

                                So, neither CapeCodGuy or T.Clark have enjoyed Phillipe and Linda's hospitality, yet see fit to dismiss them.... interesting... :)

                                What is it about "too B&B" that puts you off? We found that traveling through France and England that B&Bs gave us an in with the locals and a much richer experience than a hotel experience....

                                1. re: okra

                                  But it's not France or England, and I AM a local ;)

                                  I'm entitled to my own likes and dislikes and I attempted to temper that with a compliment in the statement; "I understand it's very good". That comes from friends who have dined there and gave me their opinion. But they also described their experience and from that I extracted, it's probably just not my bag.

                                  When I say the B&B experience I rely on my previous stays and what I took away from them. I don't like limited menu selections, being thrust together with strangers I really don't want to meet and I don't want quaint. Heck I'm just not that social. Actually It's the same thing I didn't like about Martha's, so I can see we have difference in what a dining experience means to us.

                                  1. re: okra

                                    I didn't say it wasn't good, but like T.Clark, the scene holds zero interest to me. It doesn't matter how good the food may be, I can't not imaging myself walking into someone's home and eating what ever is being served that evening and socializing with strangers. Call me anti-social if you want, but it's not for me. It's the same reason I avoid B&Bs, although I will dine at an Inn on occassion. Chez D is neither a B&B nor an Inn. It's a private home. As such, does it even get the benefit of a regular visit from the Plymouth health inspector?

                          2. re: okra

                            We were dying to try Chez Ducrot (restaurant or not, it sounds great) but he's only serving on weekend nights and we were there early in the week. I'm guessing Chez Ducrot is like the Crystal Quail in NH?

                            -----
                            Chez Ducrot
                            40 Russell Street, Plymouth, MA 02360

                        2. re: Isolda

                          Sorry that your choices didn't fare well, and I guess I'm really being selfish when I say that I'm sad to hear Run of the Mill isn't good. I had been thinking of taking a drive down, but this will save me a trip. As T.Clark had posted it has gone through a few new owners.