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How to make the perfect "6-Minute Egg" in 10 minutes

ipsedixit Feb 18, 2011 10:19 AM

If you have an electric water heater, either from Zojirushi or Panasonic, or whatever brand, then this is how to do it.

Get your water heater to bring the water to 208F (it should be one of the settings on the water heater).

Dispense the 208F water into a bowl, drop a room temp egg into the bowl, and just let it sit there, uncovered, for 10 minutes.

Then remove the egg and turn on the faucet and run some cold tap water over the egg for about 30 seconds to stop the cooking and allow for easier peeling.

The result?

The perfect 6-minute egg in 10 minutes!

And what, you might ask, is the "perfect" 6-minute egg? Well, in my mind it is where the egg whites nearest the shell are firm but not rubbery, and the whites nearest the yolk are soft, sort of like cottage cheese in texture if you will. And the yolk holds together but is still soft and runny, like thick stirred custard. In other words, it's like an over-easy basted egg that still looks like an egg.

Cheers and enjoy!

Picture below for illustrative purposes (and pic is not mine).

 
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    small h RE: ipsedixit Feb 18, 2011 03:00 PM

    208 degrees is awfully close to 212 degrees. So it seems to me that you may as well just bring a pot of water to a boil, then take it off the heat and put the egg in. Does that four degrees make a discernible difference?

    4 Replies
    1. re: small h
      goodhealthgourmet RE: small h Feb 18, 2011 03:31 PM

      shouldn't if you just take the egg out about 30 seconds earlier. the white closest to the shell might get a teeny bit firmer, but i imagine you could achieve the same texture/doneness in the middle that ipse got.

      1. re: small h
        ipsedixit RE: small h Feb 18, 2011 04:19 PM

        The problem with using a "pot of [boiling] water" is that (1) the boiling water is hotter than 208F as you correctly note and (2) the pot conserves the heat of the water more than a regular bowl does.

        You take a pot of boiling water off the heat, and if you have a thermometer in there, it maintains 212 (or higher) for quite a while.

        1. re: ipsedixit
          s
          small h RE: ipsedixit Feb 18, 2011 04:52 PM

          Ok! New plan. Boil water. Pour water into bowl. Place egg in bowl. Except that I imagine the amount of water and the make of the bowl are also variables.

          I can't remember where I read this, but I was fascinated for a while by one woman's quest to make her husband's half-boiled egg as well as his mother did. It involved spinning the egg in the hot water with a spoon, so as to keep the yolk exactly in the center. I tried it a couple of times, but it was kind of exhausting. And not really worth the effort.

          1. re: small h
            ipsedixit RE: small h Feb 19, 2011 11:05 AM

            It involved spinning the egg in the hot water with a spoon, so as to keep the yolk exactly in the center. I tried it a couple of times, but it was kind of exhausting. And not really worth the effort.
            ________________

            Yeah, that's a bit too anal.

      2. a
        anndillman RE: ipsedixit Feb 18, 2011 03:37 PM

        Won't the egg break/crack as soon as you place it in the water?

        2 Replies
        1. re: anndillman
          Quine RE: anndillman Feb 18, 2011 03:40 PM

          the OP said room temp egg, so no.

          1. re: anndillman
            greygarious RE: anndillman Feb 18, 2011 04:10 PM

            A cold egg can go into boiling water as long as you first prick the large end with a thumbtack or needle. Unless the shell is already compromised, the egg won't crack or leak.

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