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Cleaning glass oil/vinegar bottles

I have the tall glass oil/vinegar cruets. The ones that I fill with oil, I have a devil of a time cleaning them. I put Dawn in and fill with hot water, and let them soak for awhile. I also put my hand on the top and shake vigorously. I have long skinny brushes, but they can't reach the sides, because the top opening is so small. When I rinse them and let them dry, they never fully dry because it appears that the water is clinging to a small amount of oil residue left on the glass, even after repeating the cleaning process multiple times. I have put them in the dishwasher, but it doesn't do any better, probably because the water can't get into the small opening. Does anyone else have this problem, and more importantly, does anyone have a solution to this problem? Thank you in advance.

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  1. I use denture cleaning tablets for cleaning a lot of stuff that is otherwise problematical. Neck too long and skinny? Burned on food? Mineral deposits? Discoloration? Give denture tablets a try overnight.

    They're cheap. They don't take up a lot of storage space. They're perfectly safe for anything used in food prep.

    Sometimes, like with burned on food, I give them a soak over night, scrub the following morning and still have to give the container a second soak with new tablets. Still, not much investment in doing that. I hope they do the job for you.

    Another trick is to add raw rice to the mixture of hot soapy water and give that a shake. The rice kernels provide a little more abrasion than just the agitation of the water.

    1 Reply
    1. re: rainey

      I'm very glad to read this. I just unpacked a couple of narrow-mouthed vases that have been in storage for quite awhile. They have the mineral deposit or whatever on them. Dentur tablets sound like just the trick. Thanks.

    2. If you get the bottle brushes that have a twisted wire stem, you can usually bend them into an S shape to get into the hard-to-reach "shoulders" of small-mouthed bottles.

      1. I have this issue but I don't consider it a problem :) The minute amount of water compared to the amount of olive oil doesn't seem to have any effect. Regarding vinegar, same answer but even less of an issue. Diluting the vinegar that such a teensy bit couldn't possibly alter the flavor. All in IMNHO, of course :)

        1. I just cleaned my glass oil dispenser and had the same issues. After trying to clean it with dish detergent and water, I had the same problem with getting it to dry completely.

          I poured a little white vinegar into the bottle and shook it around to try to break down the oil residue and then rinsed with hot water. I also let it dry in direct sunlight and afterwards, there was no water inside.

          1 Reply
          1. re: Philly Ray

            I also let it dry in direct sunlight and afterwards, there was no water inside.
            ~~~~~~~~~~~
            and if direct sunlight isn't an option, i've discovered that a hairdryer does the trick :)

          2. Do the Dawn and hot water, but add a tablespoon or more of raw rice. It will act as a mild abrasive and scrub the insides of the bottles.

            1. A trick that I learned from homebrewing that must be the same concept but even cheaper than the denture tabs is oxyclean. Just be sure to buy the unscented stuff and rinse the heck out of it. I don't worry to worry about a little water in my oil bottle though.

              1 Reply
              1. re: LaureltQ

                This is good to know. I have OxyClean on hand so I could give it a try,

                Tell me, tho, is this something that's food safe? I suppose the residual amount that may cling to dry glass is minimal but, even still, if it isn't something that's rated for contact with mucous membranes and/or minimal consumption I'll stick with the modest expense of the denture tabs.

                In any event, there are things like glass vases that don't involve any human consumption that this could be ideal for. Does it take care of mineral deposits too?

              2. So I be a late comer here. I learned a trick. Works on things that have a calcium deposit as well.
                Sand
                You all heard me. Sand. nice fine grit sand. Add a spoon of that with your Dawn (but honest,dishwasher stuff works better) Shake, rest a bit, shake.. Save that sand. I got mine at a Pet live fish store. Really common.