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Glass Stove Top put in/ and I do nothing but burn everythiing on it

Help Please!!!!!! As stated in my title, I have had a glass stove top put in; however, now every time I cook something it burns no matter how low I set the dial. The pans I use are stanles steal with coper bottoms....and I am having to cook frozen meals. "YUCK" Please help or advise what i am doing wrong...

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  1. Either there is something wrong with the cooktop or you don't know how to use the burners. Have you tried working with them without actually having to cook a meal--just practicing. Try different pots and pans with just water in them and see if you can adjust the boil from rolling to simmer to quiet based upon how you set the knobs...they could be a lot more sensitive than what you've used before. If in fact you can control the water, then try frying some bread in oil--see if you can keep it from burning. If all that works without the stress of having to get a meal on the table, then you'll know it works and you just need to learn more.

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    1. Agree with escondido ( muy buen consejo, escondido) practice with water in various pots and pans. If you can't control the water, I'd suggest something not quite right with the cooktop. If you can control it, you will learn what setting represents low, simmer, medium, boil.... etc.

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      1. Two of my girls have had the glass cooktops and neither likes them. My guess is that you are on the steep part of the learning curve. As the others have said, practice.

        1. I truly do not know what nut case came up with the glass cooktop idea. The pans slide all over the place, they are horrible to clean, and the temperature regulation sucks. Mine was just tossed into the back of a truck this week and I was so happy to see it go.

          6 Replies
          1. re: JEN10

            Just in case this was not a retorical question: German manufacturer Schott introduced Zerodur in 1968. That's the first glass-ceramic cooktop.

            My girls are in your camp! My spouse has tried to cook on their glass tops and has ruled them out completely for the kitchen remodel. The overall opinion in our family is that whoever invented them, didn't intend to cook on them. They look so nice.

            1. re: mikie

              Oh don't just rule out all glass tops in the world already. Induction glass top = heaven IMO.

            2. re: JEN10

              The only pans that slide "all over the place" are pans that do not have flat bottoms. If you are using lightweight pans that change form when heated, or warped pans, they will wobble. If you use quality cookware, ranging from standard cast iron to Le Creuset to high end stainless steel, there is no wobbling. This is not a problem with the cooktop, it is a problem with your cookware. You would have the same problem with an induction burner, plus the issue of using the right materials.

              I cooked on gas for my whole life, and was horrified when I ended up in a house that had electric coils. THAT caused me to burn everything, probably because the burners were old and faulty. They even shot sparks at me at one point. I pulled the whole cooktop out and vowed to replace it with a great ceramic/glass cooktop. I tried to install the Dacor, but it required 1/2 inch more than my cabinets could accommodate, once the pop-up ventilation was considered, so I bought the GE Profile with a built in downdraft. It is a great cooktop, and after only a few months, I didn't miss gas at all. I cook a lot, and I cook for large groups and have a decent reputation as a private caterer. There is nothing wrong with these cooktops if they are good quality. You do need good quality pots and pans with very flat bottoms. For example, my Calphalon anodized skillets wobble versus any of my Demeyere or Cuisinart or Le Crueset pans, or even my Lodge cast iron. My only complaint is downdraft. I cook too many things that smoke and can easily produce more smoke than my downdraft can handle. A good batch of grilled veggies on a double sized cast iron grill is enough for me to have to turn on additonal house fans and open the back door. If you cook with a wok (I do) or cast iron grills (I do) or sear fish or meat (I do), the cooktop does its job, but you should investigate different ventilation options. I also use the cooktop as a spare counter when it is turned off and cool. It is nice to be able to put things on the surface in a pinch. They are very easy to keep clean if you clean up regularly and don't let stuff build up on them. BTW, I recommend that you only buy a dark color. Skip white unless you are masochistic.

              1. re: RGC1982

                +1 on having a little extra usable space when you need it.

                and +1 on not having white...it's hard enough to keep a black top presentable!

                1. re: RGC1982

                  I only have Le Crueset and Lodge pans, all slide when stirring on the glass cooktop. I would never ecommend a glass top to a client that really likes to cook. To each his own, I can not wait to get back to using gas in my latest kitchen remodel.

                  1. re: JEN10

                    there's a lot of us who really like to cook who really like our glass cooktops.

              2. Have they gotten worse in the last decade? Mine works fine. It cleans up nicely too. My burners hold their heat well, and I made a bechamel directly on the burner (In an All Clad saucier--very heavy bottom) and I boil water pretty fast. I am having a bit of trouble with the Lodgle grill pan; it gets too hot on med heat. I probably need to switch burners for it. I read these complaints and they don't sound like my cooktop at all.

                For the OP, you can call the service people or the dealer, and have a repair person come out to check the thermostat. If I was having that much trouble, that's what I would do. And, you've read the manual, right? Also, If you are used to cooking on high, then start using med as your default temp, except for boiling water.