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Beef bones from grass-fed cows?

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Enso Feb 6, 2011 08:32 AM

Know of any sources? Do they cost an-arm-and-a-leg more than the "mainstream" ones?

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    churchka RE: Enso Feb 6, 2011 03:41 PM

    Seward Co-Op has them labeled as dog bones. I think they are like $3.50 a pound, or something. My dog loves them.

    3 Replies
    1. re: churchka
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      Enso RE: churchka Feb 11, 2011 10:29 AM

      And they're from grass-fed cows?

      1. re: Enso
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        churchka RE: Enso Feb 11, 2011 08:26 PM

        They are grass fed. And I'm sure they could be used for eating. I doubt the co-op would sell something to my dog. But the butcher would know.

      2. re: churchka
        The Dairy Queen RE: churchka Feb 11, 2011 04:11 PM

        Doesn't that mean they aren't safe for human consumption? That, at some point, they were stored improperly or something?

        ~TDQ

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        shoo bee doo RE: Enso Feb 6, 2011 03:44 PM

        Go to the meat wagons at the winter St. Paul Farmers Market on Saturday and Sunday mornings.

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          bookgirlmn RE: Enso Feb 11, 2011 03:51 PM

          I know that the Grass Fed Cattle Co. offers soup bones as part of their package deals. I don't know whether they could get you some individually.
          http://grassfedcattleco.com/

          3 Replies
          1. re: bookgirlmn
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            Enso RE: bookgirlmn Feb 14, 2011 11:34 AM

            They said no...

            1. re: Enso
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              dalewest RE: Enso Feb 16, 2011 05:26 PM

              @Enso,

              I am curious about your plans for these bones (if you can find them.) I am all for grass fed beef for many reasons. What drives your search for grass fed beef bones? Flavor or more politically coorect pho?

              1. re: dalewest
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                Enso RE: dalewest Feb 17, 2011 07:04 AM

                I think grass-fed, drug-free beef is healthier to eat (and tastier). You can get a hint of my direction by skipping through these long articles to where they mention "grass-fed".

                http://www.marksdailyapple.com/bone-m...

                http://www.marksdailyapple.com/cookin...

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            Velomama RE: Enso Feb 4, 2012 06:41 PM

            So did we get an answer? I am curious as well to where I can get these bone for making tallow.

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              keg RE: Enso Feb 5, 2012 05:52 AM

              Disclosure: I'm a butcher at Seward.

              The beef bones are from Hill and Vale (a whole carcass cutting program). This is a local grass fed animal that is grain finished for 3 months. It's grown without hormones or antibiotics. Dog bones are generally marrow bones, and soup bones are meatier bones or knuckle bones. Both are managed with the same safe food handling practices.

              The entirely grass fed line of beef at Seward is is from Grass Run Farm, and arrives in the form of boneless sub primals that we freshly cut into steaks, roasts, stew, stir fry, etc.. Oxtails from Grass Run Farm are frequently available.

              Another distinction would be organic certified bones, and I'm fairly certain these would demand a higher price. I'm not aware of any local sources.

              Any shop cutting from carcass will offer bones for dogs and stock. Lamb, pork, bison, and occasionally elk bones are available at Seward.

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