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Cookbook/recipe rec's for homemade pasta - not using a KA mixer

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I would like to try making homemade pasta/ravioli and would like a starter cookbook recommendation or tried and true recipes for fresh pasta NOT using a Kitchenaid mixer ( don't own one).

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  1. The Silver Spoon, Phaidon Press, is the backbone of Italian cooking for young Italian newlyweds--it is a cooking bible somewhat like our Joy of Cooking. It was only translated into English about three years ago or so. Basic pasta recipe: 1 3/4 C. all purpose flour (plus extra for dusting), 2 egs slightly beaten, salt. Sift the flour and a pinch of salt into a mound on the counter. Make a well in the center and add the eggs. Using your fingers, gradually incorporate the flour and eggs and then knead for about 10 minutes. If too soft, add a little flour, if too firm, add a little water. Shape into a ball and let rest 15 min. Roll out and cut into desired widths.

    1. I've used Marcella Hazan's, from either of her first two cookbooks, which are now combined in a single volume, ESSENTIALS OF ITALIAN COOKING. I do not know if any changes have been made in her pasta recipe or technique in the newer volume, as I didn't buy it since I had the two originals.

      I liked Giuliano Bugialli's method better than Marcella's, however. He adds a little EVOO and uses XL eggs, which I have always used. I bought THE FINE ART OF ITALIAN COOKING back in 1979, post-Hazan. Giuliano's pasta just rolled out better from my very first batch, and it's what I've stuck with over the years.

      I made James Vetri's "basic" pasta about a month ago, from his recent cookbook IL VIAGGIO DI VETRI. It calls for semolina, egg *yolks* only, and a bit of water, of which I used too much, and it was a little too wet by the time I made my ravioli/tortelli. I liked the final product a lot, though, and would consider doing it again. I think Jamie Oliver uses yolks only (or a generous percentage of them) in his pasta dough, but I've never bought his book or used his method.