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Omnivore has questions about tofu

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  • vvv03 Jan 29, 2011 09:14 AM
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I am developing a growing affection for tofu. I especially like the kind of tofu you get in Japanese restaurants, agedashi or in teriyaki. It seems like it's softer than store bought tofu I've tried but still somewhat firm. Is this something you can buy in a store or is it the sort of thing that you leave to a Japanese restaurant to do well? Is it easy to prepare in this fashion? It seems like they use a light breading and that's it, but probably it's much more complicated than that. Any advice or direction you can give would be very much appreciated. I shop at the Park Slope Food Coop and I think they have a decent tofu selection, so if there are certain brands or textures that I should be going for (or if there is a Japanese grocery store in Brooklyn or Manhattan that sells good stuff), I'd welcome the suggestions.

Thanks again!

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  1. Try to find Silk or Silken Tofu in your markets. That's what you are looking for. Most Asian (ie Japanese and Chinese) markets will carry it. There are different brands, one example is listed below in the pic.

     
    5 Replies
    1. re: ipsedixit

      Don't use Mori-Nu for any dish where tofu is the star. It's fine when puréed into something -- soup, cake batter, etc -- but the flavour's not good enough to stand on its own.

      1. re: piccola

        Disagree. I use it to braise, for MaPo Tofu, as well as for deep-frying. Very versatile.

        1. re: ipsedixit

          Fair enough. I find it tastes, well, shelf-stable and the texture's a little weird. But hey, to each his own.

          1. re: piccola

            If this short exchange tells us anything, it should be to try different brands and find one that works for you. :)

            1. re: joonjoon

              Exactly! I think a lot of people try one kind, hate it, and give up on tofu forever. There's a lot of variation between brands.