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Food fads around the world

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loukoumades Jan 25, 2011 02:15 PM

I'm interested in hearing about food fads in countries around the world. Here in France the craze for verrines (serving dishes chopped up into little pieces layered in a glass) is thankfully slowing. Another big fad is savoury "cakes", like savoury quickbreads with bits of meat and cheese in them. And then there's macarons...

I read a lot about American food fads, gourmet food trucks, cake pops etc. But was wondering what fads exist in other countries. Anyone out there got some to tell me about?

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  1. l
    loukoumades RE: loukoumades Jan 27, 2011 07:05 AM

    What, nothing?
    Maybe other countries just aren't as faddy food-wise, as US and France.
    A Japanese one I've read about is Taiyaki. Has anyone tried these?

    6 Replies
    1. re: loukoumades
      mamachef RE: loukoumades Jan 27, 2011 07:40 AM

      Well, here in the states there's a heavy move towards sustainable game: elk, bison, etcetera. I don't know if it's a fad per se, but I know a trend when I see one. And if trendy means faddish, there we have it.

      1. re: mamachef
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        loukoumades RE: mamachef Jan 28, 2011 05:39 AM

        Thanks. Perhaps I meant trend rather than fad, you're right.
        There must be some trendy foods in other countries that aren't originally American like so many are (i.e. cupcakes). I'd love to know about them.

        1. re: loukoumades
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          Chowrin RE: loukoumades Jan 28, 2011 05:49 AM

          http://justbento.com/forum/morning-cu...

          1. re: loukoumades
            mamachef RE: loukoumades Jan 28, 2011 05:54 AM

            Flavored and specialty mayonnaises.

        2. re: loukoumades
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          Chowrin RE: loukoumades Jan 28, 2011 05:46 AM

          taiyaki is not a fad. Maybe cowboy bars?
          I'd be tempted to say KFC Christmas cake, but that's also not a fad, just a uniquely japanese thing.

          1. re: loukoumades
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            Chowrin RE: loukoumades Jan 28, 2011 05:47 AM

            redbean taiyaki is excellent. great breakfast from J-town, SF, if you're ever there.

          2. c
            Chowrin RE: loukoumades Jan 28, 2011 05:51 AM

            http://www.fas.usda.gov/info/agexport...

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              ddhug RE: loukoumades Mar 9, 2013 02:29 AM

              To tell you food fads in Australia. A lot is to do with health. And healthy food promoted by celebrity people like model Miranda Kerr who promoted coconut milk. But then a lot of the time food is promoted that is food that is unique and exotic. no one in Australia wants to eat like their mother did or their grand mother. So if people can show off to their neighbours a new cuisine from Europe or vietnam. And then talk about the health benefits of the new food. But not necessarily healthy most of the dessert is French especially macarons are every where in Sydney and Melbourne. The only other fad is native Kangaroo meat. I have tried to cook it problem is just that little bit too much and it is ruined. It is very tricky to get right. Kangaroo can taste like venison. The European Deer but I am not hundred per cent. Because when I had European Deer in the restaurant in Paris the cheff was professional. Kangaroo is very much experimental. What to do with the Kangaroo in the kitchen will take some time. But the Sydney casino restaurant is preparing Kangaroo as well as Rabbit. Oh and the European bird pheasant I think. Or it may be a smaller bird but I do not know european birds. How these birds are brought to australia and who keeps them?

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                Maedl RE: loukoumades Mar 9, 2013 05:21 AM

                I live part of the year in southern Germany and it seems like every summer, we have THE aperitif--several years ago, the Aperol spritzer made its way up from Italy. it is like liquid sunshine--Aperol mixed with Prosecco and a bit of sparkling water with a sprig of mint and an orange slice. This past summer the Hugo was high on the charts--that is elderflower syrup mixed with Sekt or Prosecco. Between the two drinks, it is hard to make a choice--as they would say in Germany, both aperitifs are 'lekker' (delicious).

                Perhaps twenty years ago, Bavaria had a brief fling with the Berliner Weiss. that is a sour wheat beer from Berlin mixed with sweet woodruff or raspberry syrup. This produces either a pink or green drink, and is served in a huge brandy-snifter-like glass. I haven't seen Berliner Weiss served in Bavaria for years, although you can find the proper beer an dsweet woodruff syrup in big grocery stores where vacationing Berliners can retreat if our local beers don't suit them.

                3 Replies
                1. re: Maedl
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                  shoo bee doo RE: Maedl Mar 9, 2013 09:13 AM

                  I remember folks ordering Berliner Weiss 40 years ago in the area around Frankfurt.

                  1. re: shoo bee doo
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                    Maedl RE: shoo bee doo Mar 9, 2013 10:44 AM

                    It would be interesting to know if it is still popular around Frankfurt. I wouldn't be too surprised if you could still find it here and there in that region. but Berliners and Bavarians mix like water and oil and a real Bavarian probably wouldn't want to be caught with a Berliner Weiss.

                    1. re: Maedl
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                      Wawsanham RE: Maedl Mar 14, 2013 02:21 PM

                      I had a Berliner Weisse in July, 2012 in Frankfurt.

                2. s
                  shoo bee doo RE: loukoumades Mar 9, 2013 09:14 AM

                  How about the Doner Kabob in Germany and Austria? I know it's been around at least 10 years. Maybe that wouldn't be considered a fad.

                  1 Reply
                  1. re: shoo bee doo
                    m
                    Maedl RE: shoo bee doo Mar 9, 2013 10:41 AM

                    Döner kebab has been popular since the 1970s, maybe even earlier--I think it is there to stay. that arrived with the Turkish workers and quickly worked its way into German food!

                  2. f
                    FriedClamFanatic RE: loukoumades Mar 9, 2013 10:46 AM

                    In a period when Asparagus seems to be readily available year-round, I still love the special "Asparagus Menus" you start to see soon in Germany and elsewhere

                    3 Replies
                    1. re: FriedClamFanatic
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                      Maedl RE: FriedClamFanatic Mar 9, 2013 02:38 PM

                      Yes! It is asparagus time, which runs almost concurrently with strawberry time, which segues into chantarelle time, then onion pie and new wine time, plum kuchen time, and so on far into the night! But all that is not a fad--it's tradition and seasonal.

                      1. re: FriedClamFanatic
                        linguafood RE: FriedClamFanatic Mar 9, 2013 02:47 PM

                        The asparagus that is available year round doesn't hold a candle to the white gold that is in season from late March until June 24 (officially the last day of the season), hailing from the areas of Beelitz and Schwetzingen.

                        1. re: linguafood
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                          FriedClamFanatic RE: linguafood Mar 10, 2013 07:35 AM

                          so true!

                      2. b
                        BuildingMyBento RE: loukoumades Mar 9, 2013 01:30 PM

                        If there's a queue in a depachika in Japan, it might be a fad. A while back it was croissants, but last month, I saw people queuing up for pieroshkis. Who knows?

                        Japan, the only country where individual department stores have their own fads.

                        1. h
                          Harters RE: loukoumades Mar 9, 2013 01:40 PM

                          Mercifully, the cupcake fad in the UK seems to be drawing to a close. And not soon enough, IMO.

                          And, in its place, we're seeing a return to traditional British baking. Which, I suppose, is a new fad in itself. Sort of.

                          3 Replies
                          1. re: Harters
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                            stilldontknow RE: Harters Mar 12, 2013 07:00 PM

                            Amen to this. I've always loathed cupcakes. I have a friend coming this weekend bringing some lovely Dorset Apple cake and clotted cream to go with it. I love the variety of regional British baking.

                            1. re: stilldontknow
                              melpy RE: stilldontknow Mar 15, 2013 09:28 AM

                              Oh how I wish I didn't have to have cupcakes at my wedding :(
                              Since it isn't something I particularly care about I have left that decision to my fiancé and my mother.

                            2. re: Harters
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                              cresyd RE: Harters Mar 14, 2013 01:43 PM

                              Israel has had its own cupcake fad - which is made worse because Israel doesn't really have a true cake tradition. There are bakeries where you can get a traditional "cake" - but in no way like Europe or North America. So to see cupcakes pop out of a culinary environment that doesn't really include cake, it's far far worse.

                            3. linguafood RE: loukoumades Mar 9, 2013 02:47 PM

                              Banh mis seem to have made their way to Germany.

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