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How safe is your kitchen?

BPA from plastic, radiation, radon from granite countertop...miscrowave radiation...carbon monoxide, burnt food, DEHA from plastic wrap, teflon frying pans..

I stopped using plastic tupperware, replaced my nylon cookwares with silicone, i try my best not to eat burnt food..and got rid of teflon pans.
My coworker doesn't have a microwave oven.
How far are you willing to go to make your kitchen more safer?
I know some people say, air we breath in is cancerous. I am not here to say who is right or wrong.
Just wanted to know what other people are doing about these issues.

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  1. I cook food in my kitchen and then I eat the food.

    1. There was a New York Times article where a health inspector agreed to "inspect" a woman's kitchen. None of the things you mentioned were even on the list. The biggest problem with the woman's kitchen was the fact she had a cat--that was known to walk on the counter once in awhile. I figure with 4 cats I'd be condemned by the Board of Health in about 30 seconds......but friends love to come and eat here because we love to cook.

      2 Replies
      1. re: escondido123

        but that NYT article wasn't about the same kind of "health" issues the OP mentioned...it was a restaurant-style inspection to illustrate what's required for restaurants to stay open, serve food that won't give its customers food poisoning, and remain in the DOH's good graces. big difference.

        1. re: goodhealthgourmet

          I understand that, but in my opinion those are the issue we need to be worrying about the most not radon from countertops and radiation of microwaves.

      2. I usually wipe down the counters after I prepare a meal. I don't use the microwave much, but only because I find there are better ways to cook or reheat food. I don't have much plastic around, being more of a metals guy, but I've got no problem reusing quart yogurt containers to freeze stock for future soups. I am cognizant and accepting of my mortality.

        1. While there are definitely problems with stuff such as teflon pans, I think people should be more concerned about proper handling of food. Most people don't even know the correct temperatures of their refrigerator or freezer. I remember once watching a TV show where home cooks were judged according to restaurant standards. Virtually all of them would have been shutdown due to multiple code violations, such as improper temperatures, cross contamination, wearing jewelry while preparing food, etc.

          1. "Just wanted to know what other people are doing about these issues."

            Nothing. Not a single thing on your list. The issues you've brought up are meaningless to me.

            I do, however, try to keep the joint reasonably sanitary.

            Lucy