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Beef Neck Bones?

Hi "hounds... anyone know where I might score a couple of pounds of meaty beef neck? Whole Foods says no, ditto Fresh Market - they don't break down anything but the cryo primals they receive... I am in Cary but would travel. Thanks for any recs & mangia bene!

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Fresh Market
4223 Providence Rd, Charlotte, NC

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    1. Grand Asia perhaps. They have just about every other part of an animal!

      1 Reply
      1. re: meatn3

        If you are ever in Greensboro or Charlotte you can get them at the Super G Mart. It is a International grocery store with every type of fresh meats, vegetables and seafood you can imagine. Their prices gre good too so bring a big cooler. A really neat experience if you like to cook!!

      2. Aside from the Asian and Latino grocery stores that have already been mentioned, for this kind of thing, you want to check Food Lion and Piggly Wiggly, not Fresh Market and Harris Teeter. I can't even buy country ham at my local Harris Teeter.

        I saw neckbones at Food Lion just the other day, but don't remember from what animal.

        1 Reply
        1. re: Naco

          +1 on Food Lion. I think I've seen pretty much every part of the cow, pig, or chicken you'd want to buy at the Food Lion in my neighborhood. They might not have everything in stock every time.

        2. I see pork neckbones around pretty frequently. Beef are tougher to find because of the size. There aren't that many butchers left dealing with whole beef carcasses (which you'd need coming in to get neck bones, sometimes they'll still come w/ sides of beef but given the market, less often, I'm told).

          You might try to find out who is butchering for beef growers you like and see if they can sell direct to you. I *think* that most local meat right now is being processed in Siler City but I can't recall the name of the place.

          2 Replies
          1. re: brokegradstudent

            Good idea on locating processing facilities. I found this link which lists them by animal type for the state:

            http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/chatham/ag/Su...

            1. re: meatn3

              The packaging on the Cane Creek/Braeburn beef I cooked for dinner says that they use USDA processor #7975. Carolina boar goats uses the same one.

              A google search tells me this is Matkins Meat Processors in Gibsonville. Since they are cutting & packing to order, the farms could probably also hook you up.

          2. Just got back from a trip at A&C Market on S. Saunders-Raleigh and they had lots o pieces and parts! Saw some beef bones but not certain if they're neck, might be worth a look-see.

            If you haven't been to A&C, it's a newer (I think) Asian market. Bigger than Grand Asia but not necessarily better.

            3 Replies
            1. re: RonboNC

              I buy a lot of bony animal parts to feed to my dog. Pork neck bones are common. I haven't seen beef neck bones that I can remember in any of the big Asian or ethnic markets. I'd check with a farmer who raises cattle such as Cane Creek. Grand Asia or A&C may have them as well. Cliff in Carrboro is another lead.

              What are you using them for? Ribs are more expensive to be sure, but I think they'd work. HT sells soup bones in the frozen section.

              1. re: Tom from Raleigh

                I saw beef neck bones at my local Food Lion in Carrboro Plaza

                1. re: Tom from Raleigh

                  Hi Tom. I use them a few times a year, usually, to make beef stock and beef consumme (a right pain in the @ss). I need meaty parts, not bare bones like they have for the hounds (and what a world that this is so hard to find, am I right?) I appreciate all your imput and I'm not gonna give up. By way of thanks (to you all), a great article you may not have read by one of my California friends (and fellow duck hunter) in the current issue of the Atlantic:

                  http://www.theatlantic.com/food/archi...