HOME > Chowhound > Greater Seattle >

Discussion

Mother/Daughter long weekend food and fun

Hi, Seattle area Chowhounds! I have poured over many of your posts and am working up an itinerary for a long weekend in February. I'm coming up from San Francisco with my mom for her 60th birthday - a mother daughter weekend of food, sights, and probably shopping. We love good food (who doesn't) and appreciate use of local, fresh products. Love oysters, beer, and cocktails. We are staying at the Sheraton downtown, for reference. This is the first time in Seattle for both of us. I'd be happy to hear any feed back on my rough plans below:

FRIDAY
arrive Friday noon (set)

* lunch: Salumi - split sandwich for late lunch and buy some meats for home
* happy hour: Elliott's Oyster House - arrive between 3 or 4 for progressive oyster happy hour
* dinner: any suggestions for something light not too far from the Sheraton?

SATURDAY

* lunch: Pike's Place Market - stroll and snack late morning into early afternoon - What are some of the best things to hit up? Is it worth it or necessary to get a reservation at Steelhead Diner?
* happy hour: Zig Zag or Bathtub Gin - late afternoon cocktail after Pike's Place Market and head back to hotel to spruce up for dinner
* dinner: Spinasse - we have chef's counter reservations for the big birthday dinner. Is this worth it and a strong option for a "nice" and interesting dinner?

SUNDAY

* lunch: ???
* happy hour: ???
* dinner: The Walrus and the Carpenter

MONDAY

* breakfast: Petit Toulouse for "happy hour breakfast" - saw this on Best Thing I Ever Ate...what do you all think? Then shopping and strolling in Queen Anne neighborhood.
* lunch: ???

leave to the airport mid-afternoon

I could use your advice on:
1 - Any suggestions or thoughts on the above in general are welcome.
2 - Will any of the places be not quite age appropriate for my mom? She's 60 and can feel a bit out of place in very hip or young bars and restaurants. Zig Zag? Bathtub gin?
3 - Are we missing anything major? Not renting a car, and mom isn't huge on public transpo, so not venturing too far in general.
4 - Is Walrus/Carpenter worth going out of our way or are there other good things nearby?
5 - I'm sure there are a lot of answers to this one: Where to go for a good cup of coffee and to feel very "Seattle"...?
6 - What else should we try to visit? Any particular specialties to seek out?
7 - The Brooklyn also sounds good, but I'm not sure how to fit it in.
8 - Do we need to try for fish and chips on the water? If so, where?

Thanks for any thoughts and info you can share!

-----
Steelhead Diner
95 Pine Street, Suite 17, Seattle, WA 98101

Zig Zag Cafe
1501 Western Ave Ste 202, Seattle, WA 98101

Spinasse
Seattle, WA, Seattle, WA

Elliott's Oyster House
1201 Alaskan Way, Seattle, WA 98101

Queen Anne Cafe
2121 Queen Anne Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109

Salumi
309 3rd Ave S, Seattle, WA 98104

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. Friday dinner, Palace Kitchen (6 or 7 blocks from the Sheraton)

    Elliott's happy hour fills up before it starts, especially on Fridays. Get there by 2:45 or face a wait. That said, if you like oysters as much as I do, it's worth it.

    Spinasse is lovely.

    The Book Bindery is probably the most refined restaurant in town at the moment if you are looking for that.

    To the numbered questions:
    1. A walking breakfast in the Pike Place Market - a pastry or sandwich or just good bread and butter from Le Panier, some fruit from Sosio's, maybe a piroshki - is my favorite thing to do in downtown Seattle. (I live downtown so I've done most legal things you can do here.) 8 or 9 in the morning is the best time to see the market before the crowds arrive, especially on a weekend.

    2. All the restaurants mentioned & Zig Zag will be fine. I have never been to Bathtub Gin.

    3. Cabs are abundant.

    4. Never been to Walrus & Carpenter; the menu looks good.

    5. Victrola is about 7 blocks uphill on Pike from the Sheraton and has better coffee than anything closer. Seattle Coffee Works on Pike near the market is better than any coffee in the market (including the oldest Starbucks.) The market is a treasure but is much easier to appreciate in the morning before it's crowded. (See suggestion #1) The Virginia Inn is a pleasant place near the market for a pint or two and an excellent cheese plate. If you really luck out and the weather's nice, there's a table outside on the corner of the patio with a great view. The Athenian is very Seattle but the food is not the attraction; If you want a sit-down brunch in the market with an incredible view, Maximilien is a great place (fabulous basket of pastries as well.) Etta's has better food but not the same view.

    6. If you're game for it, Seattle has great Vietnamese food. Consider some pho tai chin from Pho Bac on 7th Ave S in the International District for lunch on Monday before you leave.

    7. I don't know if it's necessary if you're already going to Elliott's.

    8. Definitely no. Avoid all the restaurants on the waterfront except for oysters at Elliott's (and don't bother with other food there.)

    -----
    Palace Kitchen
    2030 5th Ave, Seattle, WA 98121

    Zig Zag Cafe
    1501 Western Ave Ste 202, Seattle, WA 98101

    Spinasse
    Seattle, WA, Seattle, WA

    Seattle Coffee Works
    107 Pike St, Seattle, WA 98101

    Book Bindery
    198 Nickerson Street, Seattle, WA 98109

    5 Replies
    1. re: terrier

      Thanks for the tip on Palace Kitchen.

      Does Elliott's Happy Hour extend to the whole location or is it just at the bar?

      a walking breakfast at Pike's Place sounds great!

      Thanks for your time and thoughts, terrier!

      -----
      Palace Kitchen
      2030 5th Ave, Seattle, WA 98121

      1. re: selectiveomnivore

        Elliott's happy hour is in the bar area only. The main constraint is the speed of the shuckers; it'd be impossible to serve the entire seating area of the restaurant in a reasonable timeframe.

        1. re: terrier

          I don’t know how much of an oyster connoisseur you are, selectiveomnivore, but you should know that at Elliott’s Oyster Happy Hour they only serve one or two kinds of oysters out of the very large selection of Pacific Northwest oysters available. The house, not you, chooses which oysters are served. The oysters will be fresh but not necessarily the tastiest nor in line with you preference for flavor (e.g., sharp and briny vs. mild and sweet). On a Friday afternoon, the lounge at Elliott’s will be a zoo, even in the non-tourist winter months. If you are lucky enough to get a seat at the counter, the counterman (hopefully Anthony) can explain the flavor of the oysters that are being served for that day’s happy hour. Most, but not all, of the servers are also pretty knowledgeable. The main advantage of the happy hour obviously is the cheap price (which starts at 50 cents an oyster and goes up by 25 cents every half hour vs. full price of $2.50 per oyster for a dozen mixed varietal sampler). But if price is not a big factor, you might consider paying full price for at least a dozen of a variety of different oysters across the flavor spectrum, following the oysterman’s advice as to the best of each type. Since oysters are filter feeders, their flavor will vary with seasonal changes in their habitat (water salinity, temperature, and nutrient content). I prefer oysters on the briny end of the spectrum, and some of my favorites, depending on the time of year, are Effingham Inlet, Snow Creek, Chefs Creek, and Kusshi. The Totten Virginicas, an Atlantic oyster, can also be terrific, again depending on the time of year and habitat conditions. Penn Cove Selects are also usually excellent and not as briny as the aforementioned. Ditto for the Judd Coves. If you follow this route, you should also include a couple of Olympia oysters. They are the only true native Washington oyster. On the other hand, if you are not fussy about such things, and just want to slurp down some nice fresh oysters, the house-selected oysters at happy hour will be just fine. Although the oysters at The Brooklyn are also good, I think Elliott’s is the better choice. If you go to Elliott’s, there’s no reason to go to The Brooklyn over the other places on your list for food other than oysters.

          I’m not a big fan of Lola. Between Lola and Long Provincial, I think the latter is the better choice. You have made a lot of great picks and have received lots of good suggestions. Enjoy!

          1. re: Tom Armitage

            Wow - that's a great oyster rundown! Thank you. We really like oysters, but I don't think we're at connoisseur level yet. We don't have any of the specific ones you mentioned as your favorite around here, at least that I can recall. I think our tentative plan is to go 1 happy hour oyster: 1 other oyster. Depending on how much we like the first round of happy hour ones! I also like ones on the brinier side, and the sweet and creamy ones are still good, but not what I enjoy the most.

            Throughout the weekend, I want to splurge where it makes sense. I am only 25, and am not lucky enough to have an unlimited budget, nor do I want moom to have to pay for too much. Hence, really trying to take advantage of the happy hours and other steals :)

            1. re: selectiveomnivore

              That's a good plan. Don't forget to ask for information about the flavor profile of the various oysters, including the happy hour oysters. It's usually cheerfully given. I think you'll find that even the briniest of our Pacific Northwest oysters are not typically as briny as the oysters from your neck of woods in Tomales Bay and Drakes Estero.

    2. What a lovely idea.
      >>> Take a morning stroll to 7th and Pike, for a delight at Creperie Voila.
      * lunch: Salumi - split sandwich for late lunch and buy some meats for home
      >> Enjoy the line. Seriously, it's a gas.
      The fun continues inside and at the common table, where it gets even funner.

      * happy hour: Elliott's Oyster House - arrive between 3 or 4 for progressive oyster happy hour
      >>> Always good. Stick to the oyster plan like glue.

      * dinner: any suggestions for something light not too far from the Sheraton?
      Long Provincial or Lola will let you get a little air.

      * lunch: Pike Place Market - stroll and snack late morning into early afternoon - What are some of the best things to hit up? is it worth it or necessary to get a reservation at Steelhead Diner?
      >>If you are, like, totally pleased by an unsurprising diet of sit-down service, the Market will do that, as well as many other things.
      >> Zig Zag - for sure, don’t know about Bathtub Gin

      * dinner: Spinasse - we have chef's counter reservations for the big birthday dinner. Is this worth it and a strong option for a "nice" and interesting dinner?
      >> In spades.

      * lunch: ???
      You are surrounded. Start with coffee and light brunch at 1206 4th Ave, Belle Epicurian, for some savories or sweet pastries.

      * happy hour: ???
      * dinner: The Walrus and the Carpenter

      MONDAY
      * breakfast: Petit Toulouse for "happy hour breakfast" - saw this on Best Thing I Ever Ate...what
      do you all think?
      >>I've been looking forward to this, myself.
      Then shopping and strolling in Queen Anne neighborhood.

      * lunch: ???
      >>How to Cook a Wolf, 2208 Queen Anne Ave

      leave to the airport mid-afternoon
      >> If you are very clever, and a might leisurely, you'd enjoy light rail to the airport.
      Others here can direct better that I to stops en route.

      >> I encourage you to guide mom onto a Metro Bus (or tunnel) for a 2-stop ride to Macy's, on Pike Street. It's free. it's easy, you won't get mugged.

      >> Walrus/Carpenter is 5 miles away from downtown, in the historic Ballard neighborhood.
      If it was me (and it usually is), I'd take a bus, to 15th and walk a few blocks to W&C. Nearby is Jolly Roger taproom, for Maritime Pacific Imperial IPA and onion rings - and maybe a tuna slider.
      The Brooklyn is a pinstripe expense account joint. Swell, if you're into that.
      >>Ivar's is the place to be. Feed the seagulls, read about Ivar (for much more of this, and great Seattle fun, go to Ivar's Salmon House. Haute cuisine, not. Seattle, yes, and the fish is good).

      >> Mom will be like a duck in a pond, here.

      -----
      Pike Place Market
      1501 Pike Pl, Seattle, WA 98101

      Ivar's Salmon House
      401 NE Northlake Way, Seattle, WA 98105

      Steelhead Diner
      95 Pine Street, Suite 17, Seattle, WA 98101

      Zig Zag Cafe
      1501 Western Ave Ste 202, Seattle, WA 98101

      Spinasse
      Seattle, WA, Seattle, WA

      Elliott's Oyster House
      1201 Alaskan Way, Seattle, WA 98101

      Queen Anne Cafe
      2121 Queen Anne Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109

      Salumi
      309 3rd Ave S, Seattle, WA 98104

      2 Replies
      1. re: mrnelso

        Thanks, Mrnelso!

        We had been forewarned about the Salumi line. Seriously, how long at Friday around 1pm? We have a couple of very good salumi makers in the area, but none that really offer good sandwiches as well as make in house. We tried some Salumi goods that a friend brought back from his last Seattle visit, and it was great.

        Totally fine to pass up on the sit-down options at Pike's Place Market. Sounds like walking and sampling is the way to go, but wanted to be sure not to just ovelook any restaurant gems there.

        The plates at How to Cook a Wolf look pretty good! Thanks.

        Mom hates, hates, hates seagulls, so we might skip out on Ivar's...we'll see!

        We'll probably use some public transpo, but I will admit it is not mom's favorite thing to do. Do appreciate the tips on where it could be most useful!

        -----
        Salumi
        309 3rd Ave S, Seattle, WA 98104

        1. re: selectiveomnivore

          Of Salumi, I'll say again: anticipate the line. A line of the city, the natives, the weather, the occasional interesting tourist, the hanging salamis. People talk to each other here. It starts in the line, and by the time you have sandwich in-hand, the common table is in view, and you can all sit to continue. If the open bottles of wine on the table become interesting, glasses are there, and the cashier, like the line, has a little time to spare, so your interruption to settle-up for the (bargain) wine will be no trouble. Delight brings delight, here, so keep your eyes and ears available.

          Though I favor the grazing, there are restaurant gems in the Market, to be sure.
          Maximilien has mussels and a view from the bar.
          Below, Pigalle has the view, and the food.

          -----
          Salumi
          309 3rd Ave S, Seattle, WA 98104

      2. Since you are from SF I wouldn't recommend Chinese or Italian since you have very good options there. A good walking distance option(how much does your mom walk? you can always take a short cab ride) would be Sitka and Spruce in the new Melrose Market in Capitol Hill (they do take reservations, which I would recommend since it is a long wait sometimes). Capitol Hill is also fun to check out (Elliot Bay Bookstore is close and fun to poke around). Another great place to try would be Poppy for dinner (also in Capitol Hill), which is Jerry Traunfeld's restaurant (formerly of the Herbfarm)--Indian thalis (lots of small dishes on a plate--great variety to try). Capitol Hill also have terrific bars with cutting edge cocktails.

        Fish and chips--hmm, a good place, also in Capitol Hill is Pike Place Fish Fry (or at the Pike's Market, I'd try Jack's Fish Spot)

        Petit Toulouse is a good deal, but the food is just OK IMO(nice atmosphere for brunch).

        A walk in the Sculpture Park is always nice, and from there, you can try Boat Street Cafe (or if it around breakfast or teatime, Macrina Bakery is also right there for coffee and a pastry) --Boat Street is owned by the same person who started Walrus and Carpenter)

        Queen Anne neighborhood is nice, but I think that Ballard might be a little more interesting for shopping and also excellend food choices (it is a cab ride, not walking distance, but not far). There are so many food options in Ballard: incredible pastries at Cafe Besalu (see article on bakeries/sweets on http://travel.nytimes.com/2010/05/16/... Besalu Seattle&st=cse&scp=1 , also another idea for a chocolate tour at Theo's Chocolates in Fremont, not far from Ballard), Staple and Fancy (newest Ethan Stowall restaurant as well as Walrus and Carpenter), Volterra (nice Italian restaurant in Ballard) and really nice shops to check out (Fremont is also fun to visit

        )

        Breakfast (or brunch places) close to the Market to consider if you don't want to carb out: Cafe Campagne on the weekends, Lowells (in the market) is a classic Seattle diner-type food experience

        Another excellent place for cocktails is Mistral Kitchen which is in South Lake Union area (take the South Lake Union Trolley from downtown, which is fun!).

        -----
        Cafe Campagne
        1600 Post Alley, Seattle, WA 98101

        Macrina Bakery & Cafe
        2408 1st Ave, Seattle, WA

        Jack's Fish Spot
        1514 Pike Pl Ste 2, Seattle, WA 98101

        Cafe Besalu
        5909 24th Ave NW, Seattle, WA 98107

        Boat Street Cafe
        909 NE Boat St, Seattle, WA

        Queen Anne Cafe
        2121 Queen Anne Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109

        Volterra
        5411 Ballard Avenue NW, Seattle, WA 98107

        Lake Union Cafe
        3119 Eastlake Ave E, Seattle, WA 98102

        Mistral Kitchen
        2020 Westlake Avenue, Seattle, WA 98121

        2 Replies
        1. re: Jeanhea

          Jeanhea - thanks for all of this. We'll put the neighborhood insight and cocktail tips to good use.

          1. re: selectiveomnivore

            I also recommend going to How To Cook a Wolf - great food.

            I agree with the suggestion to stroll Ballard instead of Queen Anne. I live in Queen Anne and I always go to Ballard for shopping. There are lots of cute little boutiques. On Sundays there is a great farmers market in Ballard til 3pm.

            I recommend Fremont for shopping and eating - especially on Sunday. You can go to the Fremont Sunday Market, which is a little flea market on the street, and there are lots of good restaurants in that area. Plus, if you make a reservation, I highly recommend touring Theo Chocolate Factory. It's about $5 and you can eat as many samples as you wish. If you don't end up taking the tour, you can eat lots of samples in the lobby. As far as restaurants, Revel is very good and Paseo is amazing Cuban sandwiches.

            If you want to stay downtown, Le Pichet is a good breakfast spot for something Frenchy.

            I haven't been yet, but a newish place in Belltown/downtown that has caught my eye is Local 360 http://www.local360.org/ I went in for coffee and the brunch menu sounds yummy. Cool atmosphere too. Anyone tried this place yet?

            -----
            Le Pichet
            Seattle, WA, Seattle, WA

        2. I'll second Belle's recommendation for the Theo tour. I took out of town family over the holidays, and it was fantastic.

          I also want to recommend an option for your visit. Consider going to the Corson Building for brunch on Sunday, or for a dinner outting. It's uniquely Seattle, has some of the most interesting ambiance in town, and is absolutely delicious.

          1. Thank you all for your input. We had many good food highlights from our trip last weekend, and enjoyed exploring much of the city on foot in between all this eating and drinking. Here's the wrap up:

            Salumi - We tried the mole & mozzarella and the porchetta sandwiches. Both very tasty, but the porchetta was different from what I'm used to.

            Elliott's Oyster House - we got stuck waiting for bar seats for a while, but then made up for it. We had 2 dozen of the HH specials, first was Pacific sweetwaters and then Sun Hollows. We also got a dozen mixed of some other Pacifics - really enjoyed the Otter Cove. They didn't have any Totten Virginicas in, nor did I see them the rest of the weekend.

            ZigZag Cafe - fantastic bar indeed! I liked the ambiance for a relaxing, nice cocktail. Can't beat a $6 HH price on all house cocktails for that kind of quality and attention.

            La Bete - we split bacon wrapped dates with apple and fennel salad, pozole rojo with pork loin, and clams w/chorizo. All very nice and a reasonably priced wine list. The vibe here was really fun with interesting art, cool light fixtures, and dark wrought iron. It was dark and luxe but approachable.

            Paseo - went to the Fremont location and got there right at 11am opening and beat the line for two pretty tasty sandwiches. I liked their medianoche sandwich (maybe #8?) much better than the most popular, #2. I could eat those all the time and never get sick of 'em. Glad we got a seat inside, because it would've been messy to try and eat those outside somewhere.

            Fremont Brewing Co - bare bones, just beer and pretzels. A perfect stop to try a few samples at $1 per small glass.

            Tavern Law - I took Mom here for a Manhattan before dinner. Dark and in the speak-easy trend, even without going upstairs to the actual password (ahem...reservations) only spot. Very friendly and nice and calm, quiet during our early evening visit. Everything was food except the Tavern Law Mint Julep, which was served in the traditional sterling silver glass and crushed ice, but was sorely lacking on mint flavor and a balance of sweetness.

            Cascina Spinasse - We thoroughly enjoyed the whole experience here. You get a decent view into the kitchen from the chef's counter, but I thought it might be closer as in some restaurant counters where there is action right in front of you. The chef presented each dish personally, which was a nice touch. The highlight for me was his "play on temperature" salad featuring Alaskan spot prawns warm with a bit of hot chili over a cold sunchoke salad. Really balanced and fun to eat. We opted to let them pair wines, which were served by the 1/4 bottle for the two of us to split. Ended up being a good way to go and totaled just under the bottle we were thinking of buying.

            Cafe Campagne - A Sunday morning breakfast. Solid food, but they were out of a couple of things and we were seated two tables away from a toddler with annoying parents. The kind that feel the need to talk to their child in in cutesy baby talk at full volume. The house-made oatmeal was quite nice, but the fruit in it a bit lackluster.

            Pike Place Market - I was underwhelmed and disappointed from a food perspective. I think I'm a bit spoiled by the famer's markets in the Bay Area and the Ferry Building in SF. I did like Chukar's Cherries and tried an enjoyable sampler at Pike Place Chowder.

            Anchovies & Olives - The HH special oysters were kumamotos with a scallion mignonette. They would have been better without the scallions, and I'm not a purist on oysters. The hamachi crudo was nothing to write home about, but I'd go right back for the branzino main.

            Toulouse Petit - We made it for the weekday HH breakfast, and there was a line at the door. Fortuately the bar had plenty of seats. I went for a breakfast margarita, which was more margarita than breakfast friendly. The pork cheek hash (as seen on Best Thing I Ever Ate) was quite good - lots of flavor packed in there. The combo of parsnips and potatoes worked really well with the pork cheek confit.

            Serious Pie - We went for a late lunch and got two pizzas. I loved the clam and my mom was in heaven with the fennel sausage. We both ended up with half of the one we liked to take back on the plane. I was a bit worried that this place wouldn't be worth the stop since we have our fair share of "really good" and "interesting" pizzas, but this definitely matched up in my book.

            -----
            Pike Place Market
            Seattle, WA, USA, Seattle, WA

            Paseo Caribbean Restaurant
            4225 Fremont Ave N, Seattle, WA 98103

            Cafe Campagne
            1600 Post Alley, Seattle, WA 98101

            Serious Pie
            316 Virginia St, Seattle, WA 98101

            Elliott's Oyster House
            1201 Alaskan Way, Seattle, WA 98101

            Pike Place Chowder
            1530 Post Aly Ste 11, Seattle, WA 98101

            Salumi
            309 3rd Ave S, Seattle, WA 98104

            Anchovies & Olives
            1550 15th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98122

            Cascina Spinasse
            1531 14th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98122

            Fremont Brewing Company
            3409 Woodland Park Avenue North, Seattle, WA 98103

            La Bete
            1802 Bellevue Ave, Seattle, WA 98122

            3 Replies
            1. re: selectiveomnivore

              Thanks so so much for the report! Everyone needs to to do this!

              1. re: Bethwick

                Ditto on the great report. Re: Pike Place Market vs. Ferry Building, as far as food grazing is concerned, it’s no contest – Acme Bread, Cowgirl Creamery, Imperial Tea Court, Hog Island Oyster Co, Boccalone Salumeria, etc., etc., etc.??? The Ferry Building is an embarrassment of riches. In terms of produce, this isn’t exactly peak season for fresh local produce in Seattle, but even when it is, the local farmers’ markets (e.g., the University Market and the Ballard Market) in general have a more interesting variety of items than the Pike Place Market. The Pike Place Market is a local landmark with a very interesting history, but, with some exceptions (e.g., Sosio’s, Bavarian Meats, DeLaurenti’s) has become more of a tourist attraction than a Mecca for chowhounds. Although Seattle isn’t in the same culinary league as the Bay Area, you got a good sample of some of our best eateries. Well done! And, for the record, I think Seattle is in the same league and even a notch above the Bay Area in terms of craft cocktails.

                P.S. I think you get the prize for understatement in saying that “we have our fair share of ‘really good’ and interesting pizzas” in the Bay Area. Have you tried the pizza at Una Pizza Napoletana? It hadn’t opened yet the last time I was in the Bay Area.

                1. re: Tom Armitage

                  I'm so grateful for all the advice in this thread and elsewhere on this board that it's the least I can do to share my own experience!

                  Tom, you are spot on about the Ferry Building. You know it well! I kick myself for working just a walk away and not going as often as I should, but at least it saves some moolah since very little there is on the cheap side. I did enjoy the scenery, view, and a small bit of the activity at PPM.

                  Seattle's cocktails were indeed really good and the atmosphere at ZigZag and Tavern Law was welcoming and relaxing. For craft cocktails in SF, have you tried Comstock Saloon, Absinthe's bar, or Rickhouse? I love these, but they get too crowded easily. I didn't see that problem in Seattle, but I was doing early visits and not prime time.

                  LOL at the understatement prize. I guess you understand why I was hesitant to include Serious Pie during my visit, since we can easily get that sort of food around home. After my boss suggested it (he moved from Seattle in December), I figured I had to go to at least one place he recommended and it seemed like a good option. It was up to par for being tasty and interesting. Yes, I've been to Una Pizza Napoletana but only once. it is as amazing as you'd expect! So straight forward, so expertly done, completely satisfying. Definitely check it out next time you're in the Bay Area.

                  -----
                  Serious Pie
                  316 Virginia St, Seattle, WA 98101