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Non-traditional potstickers?

rcallner Jan 12, 2011 12:19 PM

I'm in love, at the moment, with potstickers. I made a couple batches of Asian style potstickers which made me and mine really happy, then looked at the rest of the unused wrappers and went creative, which so far meant: roasted butternut squash/shallot/Gruyere potstickers and garlicky-spicy-anchovy-Parmesan broccoli rabe potstickers. So tasty, so cute! I LOVE LOVE LOVE them - has anyone a suggestion for other savory potsticker fillings that are a bit off the beaten path?

  1. todao Jan 12, 2011 12:22 PM

    Fill them with a mixture of potato mixed with:
    Chorizo, prosciutto, or other tasty meat.

    1. j
      jenniferdines Jan 12, 2011 01:44 PM

      I love potstickers; they are so much fun to make. I am wondering: Do you make them ahead? How do you store them? Can they be reheated in a microwave?

      I like either shrimp or tofu with sesame oil and shallot (traditional). I am also interested in more recipes for potstickers.

      2 Replies
      1. re: jenniferdines
        rcallner Jan 12, 2011 02:37 PM

        jennifer, they're best stored by placing them not touching on a baking sheet and freezing them. It doesn't take long - they're small. Once frozen, store them frozen in a sealed plastic bag or other container. You don't need to microwave them - drop them frozen into soup if that's how you're cooking them, or just let them thaw about 15 minutes at room temp if frying/steaming. Part of their wonder and splendor is they're so small.

        1. re: rcallner
          chef chicklet Jan 12, 2011 02:48 PM

          exactly how I store wontons too, then I can have won ton soup whenever the fancy hits me, and that's pretty often. So handy, cheap and delicious.

          Are you wanting recipes to cook like the potsticker, or the wrappers?
          Long ago I'd go to my favorite Chinese restaurant and the owner would make something not on their menu. He called them Chinese ravioli, and they were basically a shrimp mix in a square wrapper, fried and served with the most delicious sauce. Sweet and sour and a few chives.

      2. a
        AdamD Jan 12, 2011 01:48 PM

        no no no to the microwave-the edges will dry out.

        We make them often. Strange pairings? German sausage, and cabbage with whole grain mustard. Ground chicken liver, red onion and hard boiled eggs.

        But most of the time its crab, shrimp, or pork with the traditional elements.

        1. rcallner Jan 12, 2011 02:37 PM

          PS I'm most interested in vegetable options.....

          1 Reply
          1. re: rcallner
            k
            Kunegunde Jan 12, 2011 07:41 PM

            Haven't made these in years but used to make a Mexican-style dumpling filling. The quickie version was canned pinto beans, onions, roasted red peppers (I always have some in the freezer), salsa, and cheese.

          2. Emme Jan 12, 2011 08:34 PM

            Edamame, onions, garlic, lemon zest, tarragon

            Chicken, carrots, celery, thai basil, lemongrass with peanut oil

            Ground tempeh, onion, soy sauce, little cornstarch, curry powder onion, garlic, whatever else you like

            1. d
              Dcfoodblog Jan 13, 2011 11:06 AM

              Middle Eastern style - ground lamb, grated carrots, cumin, cinnamon, chopped coriander and an egg with a yogurt-coriander sauce.

              1 Reply
              1. re: Dcfoodblog
                macca Jan 13, 2011 11:08 AM

                OOH- that sounds great.

              2. Veggie Liv Jan 13, 2011 11:16 AM

                Smashed curried lentils or chickpeas with scallions. Serve with some yogurt or tzatziki. YUM!

                1. luckyfatima Jan 13, 2011 11:43 AM

                  You know, dumplings are one of those foods that pop up in so many forms in such a diverse array of cultures: ravioli, pierogi, manti, mantu, momo, potsicker, mandu, gyoza, etc. What an interesting food. You can try the Nepalese momo, which is usually steamed, but sometimes also made pot sticker style, and can even be deep fried. I like it stuffed with seasoned ground meat, but spicy potato filling is also delicious. And nothing beats the Szechuan peppercorn, chile, and tomato chutney (timur chutney) that accompanies momos.

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